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  1. #1
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    Wheel getting stuck on brakes...



    This is my Trek 7200 hybrid. Its a good bike that has suited my needs well. I hung the bike up on the garage wall the other day, spun the tire, and notice it was getting stuck on the brake pads...



    Its not the front, but rear that is having the issue. I adjusted the brake pads, and how far they are initially open. The best I could get it where the wheel wasn't rubbing was when the brakes were open to the point where they would no longer stop the bike, or at least, not that well. Closing the brakes any tighter causing rubbing and eventual slow down issues.

    I looked closely at the tire spinning, and it seem to wobble, like its not straight or something. I undid the quick release and tried adjusting it with no luck. I am definitely not a bike expert, but I have a basic mechanical understanding and skill set. It seems to me that one of two things are possible...the rear rim is bent, or the rear rim is sitting properly. I imagine that its pretty hard not to align the rear wheel properly, so is it more likely that the rim is bent?


    Also, is 700c the same as 700x35. As in would that tire size fit that rim size? I am 6'8", 290lbs. I wouldn't find it hard to believe that I bent the rear rim, since my weight rests there more. Obviously just riding the bike down the street probably wouldn't bend the rim is that is the problem. I am wondering it I hat a curb too hard to something while riding. If the rim is the problem, I was looking at these...

    http://store.trekbikes.com/jump.jsp?...&bShopOnline=1

    They sound like they would be sturdier than what I have now, but I am not even sure if they are the right fit, or what fits my bike all together. It seems like an odd wheel size, my bike does have a 25" frame though.

  2. #2
    Senior Member bikeman715's Avatar
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    sound like your rear wheel need to be trued. you can take it to your lbs and have them do it for a fee around $15 or you can get a spoke wench, check out parktools.com on how to true the wheel yourself. now as far the tire size goes any that said 700c will work for you as long it clear the frame.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the info, what does LB stand for?

  4. #4
    Senior Member jack002's Avatar
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    LBS = local bike shop.
    This is the link he had refferd to
    http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=81
    I'd take it to the bike shop, but if you THINK you're up to the task, you can TRY to do it yourself. Kinda sounds like you're new to all of this, so your best bet may be the shop.

    By the way, this is not at all a big or unusual problem. If you plan to ride a lot, you'd do well to learn how to do this yourself. Not impossible to learn. The bike looks really new and *cough* unused.
    Biking isn't a sport because anybody can do it. I can bike, you can bike. For goodness sakes, my mother can bike! You don't see her on the cover of Sports Illustrated, do you?

  5. #5
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    I used to work on BMX bikes all the time when I was younger, not much with multi-speed bikes like this though.

    I got this bike in 2004, I ride it on pavement usually when its warm out. The pictures are also at least a year or two old.

    Called the shop and one is $15, one is $14. I am by no means uncomfortbale doing anything, I am just not familiar with all the maintenance that can be needed yet. I could do this, but truing stands seem a bit pricey. I will just have it done now, and if its something that I think will need to be done more in the future, I will get the stand.

    By a Trek dealer search, its disappointing there is only one left around me. One went out of business, and the one I bought my bike from stopped carrying Trek.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkKnight369 View Post
    .... I could do this, but truing stands seem a bit pricey.
    Truing stands makes the job easier, and are just about required if you're aiming for a high degree of accuracy. But if you're just shooting for serviceable straight trueing the wheel while in the frame with zip ties or brake pads as reference will do just fine.

  7. #7
    Senior Member jack002's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dabac View Post
    Truing stands makes the job easier, and are just about required if you're aiming for a high degree of accuracy. But if you're just shooting for serviceable straight trueing the wheel while in the frame with zip ties or brake pads as reference will do just fine.
    +1 here. Don't tell anyone but I don't even own a stand, I just do them in the bike and use the brakes as a guide. (looks left and right)
    Biking isn't a sport because anybody can do it. I can bike, you can bike. For goodness sakes, my mother can bike! You don't see her on the cover of Sports Illustrated, do you?

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    Hmm, so then really all I need is the spoke wrench and I am good to go. Sound easy enough.

  9. #9
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    When you're through truing the wheel there should be no wobble and the rim should be centered between both seat stays and both chain stays. The right side (drive side) spokes should have more tension than the left side. But the tension should be close to even on either side. The brake pads can be used as a reference for lateral alignment but not for centering the rim. The rim should be centered on the frame and the brakes should be centered on the wheel.

    Al

  10. #10
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    You might want to study up on troubleshooting V-brakes while you're at it.

    http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=21

    It may come in handy if you're still having problems after the wheel has been trued.
    How do you keep an idiot in suspense?

  11. #11
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    DK - You may rate a wheel upgrade as I am sure your specs exceed the design limits of the Trek's stock wheels, especially in regard to the back wheel.

    If you have further wheel issues I'd look into that upgrade.

  12. #12
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    After you have got the rim running pretty true, take it in to the bike shop and ask them to measure spoke tension with a tensiometer. The tension should be in the region of 100 -110 kg on the drive side of the wheel. Low tension leads to spoke breakage, which is siomething you should be concerned about at your weight. You dont need to go to a Trek dealer for service as bike components are much the same for all makes.

  13. #13
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    I know I do not to take it into a Trek Dealer. I just wanted to check things out. Apparently they have only been a Trek Dealer for 4 months, and I have never been in the store. They were the largest bike shop in the area, and the closest to my house. I never realized it because they had kayaks and such in front of the place.

    The only other remaining bike shop in the area, which is where I bought my bike, worries me. A former radio rock DJ was doing the mechanical work there. Before that, I heard he was changing oil at a quick lube place. Not some dude I would want working on my bike. I went in and checked out this new Trek Dealer before I brought my bike in. They were all knowledgable, and their bike mechanics have been doing it for 20 years.

    I ended up getting their tune up package along with the truing. I messed with the brakes, my gears need adjustment, and I never lubed anything in the 5 years I have owned the bike. Figure it would help until I start learning this stuff on my own.

    Thanks for all the input.

  14. #14
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    You can also search the forums for earlier threads concerning problems you may have.

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