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Old 06-17-09, 06:57 AM   #1
bagel007
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Which Tire Levers would you recommend?

  1. PEDRO'S Tire Levers
  2. PARK TOOL TL-1 Tire Levers, Set of 3
  3. PEDRO'S Tire Levers
  4. PEDRO'S Tire Levers, 2 pack

Which one is the best choice???

Thanks in advance!
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Old 06-17-09, 07:04 AM   #2
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This one is the best choice.

This isn't a bad second choice.
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Old 06-17-09, 07:15 AM   #3
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I would never use the those steel Eldi levers on Aluminum rims, particularly road or standard MTB rims. Even the dealer says they are for DH use only.

The plastic coated steel insert levers do sound like a good choice.

My favorite levers are no longer made. Specialized used to sell sets of three "Pry Baby" plastic levers that were thin enough to fit even under tight beads but strong enough to horse a reluctant tire off without breaking.

I don't have any experience with the Pedro's stuff but I have the Park levers and they are good.
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Old 06-17-09, 07:32 AM   #4
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i prefer 3 levers over 2 because sometimes you come across a stubborn bead and you need to fasten two of them to the spokes while the 3rd does all the work. ...or maybe i'm doing things wrong??

+1 on the specialized ones, then the parks
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Old 06-17-09, 07:34 AM   #5
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I would never use the those steel Eldi levers on Aluminum rims, particularly road or standard MTB rims. Even the dealer says they are for DH use only.

The plastic coated steel insert levers do sound like a good choice.

My favorite levers are no longer made. Specialized used to sell sets of three "Pry Baby" plastic levers that were thin enough to fit even under tight beads but strong enough to horse a reluctant tire off without breaking.

I don't have any experience with the Pedro's stuff but I have the Park levers and they are good.
It was intentional overkill in response to yet another "best" thread.

My favorite levers aren't available any more either: aluminum cycle pro levers I've had since I was 10. They're strong so they've lasted all these years, yet thin enough they don't cause interference from their own thickness like plastic levers often do. They're also light enough to carry with me on the bike.

In the shop my all-time favorite levers are a pair of these:



Works for 99% of tires. When those don't work you're dealing with a very tough bead that may require a steel lever...up to and including the Eldi DH lever. They won't cause rim damage if you know what you're doing.
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Old 06-17-09, 07:39 AM   #6
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I've bent a park lever trying to mount schwalbe marathon plus tires before.
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Old 06-17-09, 07:48 AM   #7
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Park or Maxxis levers but mostly I use none.
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Old 06-17-09, 08:07 AM   #8
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We use the $3 Pedro's levers at the shop where I work, and I would reccomend them. They're amazingly tough, and Pedro's waranties them. They come in pairs but I rarely use more than one at a time. For the price you can't go wrong.
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Old 06-17-09, 08:12 AM   #9
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I have a bunch of pairs of the Pedro's, and they've always been very easy. I recommend buying two pairs (like with socks); in case you lose one, you can still have a pair available (I find two handier than one, personally.) They're cheap and get the job done--why buy something costlier?
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Old 06-17-09, 08:14 AM   #10
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Standard tire levers work well, and some even can do it without the use of a lever. But I use http://www.rei.com/pwr/product-revie...eed-Lever.html

Just wedge between bead and rim, swing down, open to full length and slide end onto wheel spindle. Pull the unit completely around the bead, like the hands on a clock. It is a little long to fit into an under-the-saddle bag, but it does fit neatly into a jersey pocket. I have mine attached to the rear of my seat post by the saddle bag strap.
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Old 06-17-09, 08:18 AM   #11
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Well, I listed 4 different tire levers in my original posting, since I'll be at EMS shortly and only those ones they carry according to their website.

Ooops! Just checked the "in store" availability. They have only the PARK TOOL one this Pedro's one. I'll take both of them, just to be on the safe side.
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Old 06-17-09, 08:22 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AEO View Post
I've bent a park lever trying to mount schwalbe marathon plus tires before.
You use a tire lever to MOUNT tires? I learned not to do that long ago, the hard way.
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Old 06-17-09, 10:07 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
My favorite levers are no longer made. Specialized used to sell sets of three "Pry Baby" plastic levers that were thin enough to fit even under tight beads but strong enough to horse a reluctant tire off without breaking.
The best thing about the Specialized Pry Babies might just turn out to be the price. PM me an address and I will totally hook you up.
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Old 06-17-09, 10:16 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wordbiker View Post
In the shop my all-time favorite levers are a pair of these:



Works for 99% of tires. When those don't work you're dealing with a very tough bead that may require a steel lever...up to and including the Eldi DH lever. They won't cause rim damage if you know what you're doing.
You must not have deep rims and use the same tires most of us. The only tires I've experienced that come off my hand are many Contis but only after they are stretched from lots of miles.
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Old 06-17-09, 11:06 AM   #15
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If you have difficult to install tires (it happens), the VAR high pressure levers are just the ticket. Not too bad for taking the tires off either.
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Old 06-17-09, 11:06 AM   #16
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No tire levers are necessary on any of my 6 bikes with maybe 8 different sets of tires and 4 makes of rims. I can't remember the last time I needed a lever. I have a cheapo plastic one in the workshop and I carry one in the under saddle bag for possible need on others' bikes. Leverless R&R is usually all in the technique.
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Old 06-17-09, 11:10 AM   #17
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The best and portable:

http://cgi.ebay.com/VAR-Super-Tyre-Tire-Tool-New_W0QQitemZ310141789105QQcmdZViewItemQQptZCycling_Parts_Accessories?hash=item4835e423b1&_trksid=p4 634.c0.m14&_trkparms=|301%3A0|293%3A1|294%3A30 <EDIT> <EDIT> Note: These are now out of stock - but I suggest ask Al (the owner of the eBay store) when he'll be gatting more. They are worth the wait.


For home use - Kool Stop Tire Jack:

http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...e.aspx?sc=FRGL

For shop use:

http://www.parktool.com/products/det...=17&item=TL-10

Last edited by Panthers007; 06-18-09 at 12:14 PM.
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Old 06-17-09, 11:26 AM   #18
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The Park ones work fine for me. I like the hooks. Once in a while, it's convenient having three.
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Old 06-17-09, 11:34 AM   #19
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Quote:
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Don't over think this stuff. Go to local bike shop. Look at tire levers. Buy some.
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Old 06-17-09, 01:13 PM   #20
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I'm with Camilo. I never really cared. They all work about equally well. I do prefer steel, though.
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Old 06-17-09, 01:15 PM   #21
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Quote:
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You must not have deep rims and use the same tires most of us. The only tires I've experienced that come off my hand are many Contis but only after they are stretched from lots of miles.
Actually, deep rims make it easier. The trick is to squeeze the tire beads together and away from the bead seats. That gives you more slack to work with.

The hardest rims to remove tires off of are wide, shallow rims like Rhyno Lites.
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Old 06-17-09, 02:40 PM   #22
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Park levers are too thin, I prefer the Pedro's levers.
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Old 06-17-09, 02:50 PM   #23
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I can mount just about any tire with my own two hands. When I come across an exception I reach for my Park TL-10... It saves me from making poor language choices.

On the road a single plastic lever can make the difference between frustration and ease. Does anyone still make those skinny steel levers from the old days?
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Old 06-17-09, 03:14 PM   #24
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I can mount just about any tire with my own two hands. When I come across an exception I reach for my Park TL-10... It saves me from making poor language choices.

On the road a single plastic lever can make the difference between frustration and ease. Does anyone still make those skinny steel levers from the old days?

what do you do when you get to the last bit of tire left to be put on the rim? I've tried getting it wit my hands but I end up sitting there straining with no results
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Old 06-17-09, 03:15 PM   #25
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The hardest rims to remove tires off of are wide, shallow rims like Rhyno Lites.
Now you tell me!

In the past year I've bought 2 wheelsets w/Rhyno lites, and just bought 2 individual Rhyno lite rims for my first attempts at wheelbuilding. They were cheap and (so I heard) durable, but I certainly have been using tire levers at least a bit when starting and finishing. Then again, I've never been to my local climbing wall, so my wimpy finger muscles could use some bulking.
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