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  1. #1
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    Warped Rear Wheel

    I decided to replace the tires on a bike that I haven't used in a couple years only to discover the rear wheel is bent significantly out of shape. It's probably not salvageable, which brings me to my very first wheel replacement.

    Questions:
    1) My original tire was labeled 700x38c. Does this mean any 700 wheel will fit at a replacement?
    2) What can I expect to pay for a cheap (maybe second hand) 700 wheel?
    3) Can someone refer me to a link on how to change a rear wheel?
    4) If necessary, how much will it cost a bike shop to place the wheel for me?

    I probably left a hole in there somewhere, but these four questions will start it off.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Yes, any 700c wheel is OK, as they all have the same rim diameter and fit the same tires. Try to look for one with similar rim width if you're still planning to use 38mm wide tires. Also make sure the cassette body and overall axle width matches yours.

    Prices vary all over the board, though used ones are somewhat rare, since most are replaced for the same reason as yours.

    You can save a bit of dough by transfering your QR skewer, and you'll need a tool to remove the cassette lockring and transfer the cassette. Usually, if you buy the new wheel from an LBS, they'll transfer your tire and cassette for little or no added charge.
    FB
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    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  3. #3
    Number One iareConfusE's Avatar
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    1. Any 700c wheel will do, but choose the wheel according to what tire width you want to run.

    2. You can expect to pay around $100 for a brand new single rear wheel, or around $50-60 for a used one.

    3. Changing a rear wheel is exactly like changing the front wheel, just that you have to deal with a derailleur and a chain. Unless of course you're referring to swapping over the freehub body and cassette. If thats the case, google it, and I'm sure you can find the answer yourself.

    4. Bike shop will probably charge you maybe $50 total for labor to swap freehub or cassette over to a new wheel. Thats just a guess though, I don't actually know...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by iareConfusE View Post
    ......

    4. Bike shop will probably charge you maybe $50 total for labor to swap freehub or cassette over to a new wheel. Thats just a guess though, I don't actually know...
    Bike shops get a bad rap sometimes for high labor pricing, but no way would you pay $50 to transfer QR skewer, tire, tube and cassette to a new wheel purchased there, expect to pay from N/C up to $10 or so for the job. On a wheel purchased elsewhere it might be double that.

    It might also bit a bit more if they have to install the new wheel into your bike and adjust gears and brakes, but still nowhere close to $50.00 labor.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  5. #5
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    Take a look at these:

    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes..._400002_400002

    And these:

    http://www.coloradocyclist.com/top_level_menu/Wheels/1/

    Colorado Cyclist has excellent wheels - right out of the box. But any mail-order wheel requires checking for true, round, tension, and stressing.
    How do you keep an idiot in suspense?

  6. #6
    Number One iareConfusE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    Bike shops get a bad rap sometimes for high labor pricing, but no way would you pay $50 to transfer QR skewer, tire, tube and cassette to a new wheel purchased there, expect to pay from N/C up to $10 or so for the job. On a wheel purchased elsewhere it might be double that.

    It might also bit a bit more if they have to install the new wheel into your bike and adjust gears and brakes, but still nowhere close to $50.00 labor.
    My pricing didn't include buying the wheel from them. If the wheel was bought from them they would (I hope) probably do it for free.

  7. #7
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    A 38 mm tire sounds awfully big for a 700 wheel. Be sure that the new rim is wide enough for a 38.
    Why don't you take the wheel to your LBS and ask them to fix it. You probably just need a new rim and maybe service the hub.

    Al

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