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  1. #1
    randalll
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    damage to the cranks

    hey everyone.
    im new here, this is my first post. i dont know much about bike mechanics but i'd like to learn.

    i bought a 500 kona recently and im worried ive damaged it already.

    the first ride i did was quite intense, i was going fast over rocky terrain. it was only after i heard you're supposed to break them in steadily.

    anyway after the ride there was a grinding feel coming from the drivetrain when id turn the pedals

    i took it to the shop and they couldnt tell me what was wrong with it.... just to do a few more rides then have it serviced (they do the first one for free)

    anyway i found out it was the pedal bearings that were grinding, possibly the bottom bracket too but i really hope i dont have to replace that!

    people have told me it'd be hard to break it especially on the first ride... but the cranks dont turn smoothly at all. theres a bumpy, grinding feel when i ride the bike

    i bought some new pedals anyway (freeride pedals, i figured they'd have better bearings) and as i was removing the old ones i had to put so much pressure on the cranks to get them off, they were really torqued down onto the cranks. eventually i used a pipe on the spanner for leverage and they came off suddenly from all the force. my hand was bleeding afterwards from when i smacked it against the crank, and my spanner's a bit chewed up :/

    ive read about how you shouldnt force it.. take it to the LBS if you cant do it with reasonable force.

    the drivetrain seems to be working fine, apart from the grinding, but im worried i will have weakened the crank or the chain or the bolts or something, there was so much force on it.

    please let me know your experiences with this, and if i should worry about any damage to the bike


    thankyou

    randall

  2. #2
    rebmeM roineS JanMM's Avatar
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    No reason to break in a bike gradually. Although it's wise to hold off on hard riding until you are fairly certain that things are working correctly.
    More than a few pedals come from the factory adjusted too tight and there are reports of many new pedals being under-lubricated.
    With the chain and pedals off, does the crank feel as if it's grinding when you turn it by hand? That wouldn't be good - would indicate bottom bracket problems. If it's new, take it to the shop and have them check it out.
    RANS V3 (steel), RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

  3. #3
    randalll
    Guest
    thanks for the reply Jan

    i took the chain off and spun the pedals. it seemed quite smooth, but then again there's no resistance is there? so it wouldn't necessarily mean the BB is fine. if it isn't the BB though, what else could it be?

    i dont think the chain's rubbing on the derailleur or anything. the bottom bracket's the only thing i can think of..

    randall

  4. #4
    rebmeM roineS JanMM's Avatar
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    Is the chain clean and lubed? Any noise from the rear gears/cassette?
    You're not riding with the chain on the big ring, big cog or little ring, little cog, are you?
    Does the rear hub spin freely?

    Pics?
    RANS V3 (steel), RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

  5. #5
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    I'm with JanMM here. I have what amounts to a pedal-collection these days. And it's very rare that I acquire a set that - new - have more than a few dribbles of bad grease (more like Cosmoline), and they sound like my old rock-grinder I got from Edmund Scientific for my birthday one year. Drove my family and I stark-raving whacky.

    Most new bikes come with pedals that are really supposed to last as long as your ride back home. Then you are supposed to replace them with a set you got elsewhere. And then the problems begin. Many do buy a shiny new set of pedals - and have no idea that they should be fully overhauled with fresh grease and, perhaps (I do), fresh bearings. So they ride around on a perfectly good set of, say, MKS pedals and hate them. They grind! LOL!

    One important thing to look for in the ads for pedals - that they are 'serviceable.' And that you are up to the task or take them to someone who can do the overhaul and adjustment. Nothing quite so satisfying as free-spinning, well-adjusted pedals. They feel so good!

    With your new KONA, the shop should have explained the warranty to you. What it basically should say is that you can bring the bike back for help for X-amount of months if anything seems wrong. And many shops also throw in a free tune-up during this time. Take advantage of this. And start looking for pedals that will match your riding conditions and favorite cycling shoes (sneakers here with toe-clips).

    Enjoy!

    (Oh yeah - sealed-bearings in pedals? Disregard above.)
    Last edited by Panthers007; 07-30-09 at 11:23 PM.
    How do you keep an idiot in suspense?

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