Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    18
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Brake pads too high

    I got a set of medium reach front brakes for my fixed-gear bike. It turns out they're just a very, very small amount too high when they're all the way at the bottom of the brackets. One of the pads rubs on the tire when I apply the brakes (except real soft braking).

    Now I see that some of the little metal threads in the sidewall on one side are starting to become visible.

    Any cheap/easy ways to deal with this? I thought if I could find a slightly narrower brake pad, that would take care of it. But I don't want to start buying different brake pads and installing them only to see no appreciable difference. I don't see any dimensions listed for brake pads on the internet, and I don't think I could eye a 2mm difference when shopping for brake pads.

    The brake in question is a Shimano BR-650.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    19,999
    Mentioned
    32 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Don't continue using the existing setup because you'll damage the tires causing a blowout.

    The best, though not the least expensive solution is to find a longer reach brake, or possibly a drop bolt for your existing brake which will lower the range by 5mm or so.

    I doubt you'll find shoes with enough difference in thickness, but you can use a coarse file to shave some off the top edges of the current shoes. Otherwise, if you don't need too much extra drop you can use a rat-tail file to extend the slots in the calipers by a few millimeters.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  3. #3
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Dante's Third Ring
    Posts
    7,481
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Dia Compe and Tektro offer brakes with very long reach. I use such on my 3-speed. Hunt around if you don't want to mangle the Shimano's.
    How do you keep an idiot in suspense?

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    18
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the help. I am very cheap, so I'll probably try some combination of altering the pads and/or shaving out a little extra room at the bottom of the brackets. I measured the distance and it was right in between medium reach and long reach. I apparently chose wrong.

  5. #5
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Saratoga, CA
    Posts
    11,495
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Take a small circular file and file the bottom of the brake-pad slot on the caliper. If you need to move the pads down 2mm, extend the slot downwards by 2mm. You just need to leave barely enough metal so the two sides are connected. There's usually enough room to move the slot down by up to 4mm on most brakes, some allow even more.

  6. #6
    another retro grouch Mr IGH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Front Range, CO
    Posts
    2,574
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DannoXYZ View Post
    Take a small circular file and file the bottom of the brake-pad slot...There's usually enough room to move the slot down by up to 4mm on most brakes, some allow even more.
    This is what I do. Works fine and save $$. If I need more drop after filing the calipers to the max, I file the pads too. We did this all the time back in the 70s when someone wanted to put sew-ups in a 27" wheeled bike, never had any issues.
    IGH's, Dyno Hubs, LED lights and old frames

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    angus scotland
    My Bikes
    Grifter BSA 20
    Posts
    600
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    could try filling the fork drop outs a bit. ussually lots of metal there.
    so the wheel sits nearer the brake.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    19,999
    Mentioned
    32 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by griftereck View Post
    could try filling the fork drop outs a bit. ussually lots of metal there.
    so the wheel sits nearer the brake.
    that should only be the option of last resort. First it's harder to file steel 6mm of steel vs 3mm of aluminum, but more important is that filing the dropouts will effect how the wheel sits in the fork, and would need to be cone fairly precisely to avoid changing the tracking of the bike.

    Usually I suggest filing the dropouts only to correct a defect whereby the wheel is not in plumb.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  9. #9
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,292
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by griftereck View Post
    could try filling the fork drop outs a bit. ussually lots of metal there.
    so the wheel sits nearer the brake.
    This is seriously the worst advice I have read this month on bikeforums. Do not do this.

    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    that should only be the option of last resort. First it's harder to file steel 6mm of steel vs 3mm of aluminum, but more important is that filing the dropouts will effect how the wheel sits in the fork, and would need to be cone fairly precisely to avoid changing the tracking of the bike.

    Usually I suggest filing the dropouts only to correct a defect whereby the wheel is not in plumb.
    It's not an option, period for the OP's case.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •