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Old 10-17-09, 12:58 PM   #1
yellowrider
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how do you remove a cassette on a road bike?

The title states my main question. I was also wondering if you need a special tool to do it?
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Old 10-17-09, 01:03 PM   #2
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If only there were a tool that would let you find stuff on the internet...maybe even how-to websites or video files showing you how to do things...hmm...

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=how+do+you+remo...a+road+bike%3F
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Old 10-17-09, 01:10 PM   #3
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Park FR-5G cassette tool or equivalent for the cassette lockring, and you'll need a chain whip to hold the cassette while you loosen the lockring. A wrench will also be needed to turn the cassette tool.

Last edited by well biked; 10-17-09 at 01:13 PM.
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Old 10-17-09, 03:02 PM   #4
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First, is it really a cassette or a freewheel? Second, what make?

Shimano and Campy cassettes use different lockring tools but can use the same chain whip

Freewheels require a bewildering variety of removal tools depending on the make and model.
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Old 10-17-09, 08:20 PM   #5
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First, is it really a cassette or a freewheel?
To help the OP - if it's newer than 20 years, it's likely a "normal" cassette and freehub.
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Old 10-17-09, 09:23 PM   #6
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it is a cassette.
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Old 10-17-09, 09:26 PM   #7
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it is a cassette.
The Park Tool site is a good one to bookmark: http://parktool.com/repair/

The specific page you want to see is http://parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=48
and, yes, you need a special tool to do this.
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Old 10-17-09, 09:31 PM   #8
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Thanks for all the help. Main problem is that I don't have the tools. I guess I will just take it to the LBS to repair it if it is cheaper than buying the items myself.
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Old 10-17-09, 09:33 PM   #9
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Thanks for all the help. Main problem is that I don't have the tools. I guess I will just take it to the LBS to repair it if it is cheaper than buying the items myself.
A LBS will charge you much less than it would cost for you to buy the tool.
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Old 10-17-09, 09:34 PM   #10
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Noted. The LBS it is
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Old 10-18-09, 08:00 AM   #11
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A LBS will charge you much less than it would cost for you to buy the tool.
True if you only expect to do the job once.

If you expect to maintain this and/or other bikes in the future buying the tools will save a lot of money over the years, to say nothing of the time and gas taking the bike to the LBS.
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Old 10-18-09, 01:08 PM   #12
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True if you only expect to do the job once.

If you expect to maintain this and/or other bikes in the future buying the tools will save a lot of money over the years, to say nothing of the time and gas taking the bike to the LBS.
not to mention the satisfaction of doing it yourself, and learning a little bit more about how your bike works. Never hurts to know how to do a job yourself, when the LBS isn't an option.
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Old 10-18-09, 01:51 PM   #13
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I really like the original Pamir Hypercracker tool. Small, simplistic and easy to carry around if you're touring; no chainwhip necessary. Nowadays, you can get the Unior - Pocket Cassette ******* which does the same thing. I don't like that the arm that butts up against the chainstay isn't rubber-coated like the Pamilr. Leaves a little scratch on your bike. The 4-sided spoke-wrench is handy on the road as well.

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Old 10-18-09, 01:53 PM   #14
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True if you only expect to do the job once.

If you expect to maintain this and/or other bikes in the future buying the tools will save a lot of money over the years, to say nothing of the time and gas taking the bike to the LBS.
Yes 1+1=2
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