Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 35
  1. #1
    Senior Member undisputed83's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Westbrook, Maine
    My Bikes
    2011 Litespeed M-1, 1991 Raleigh Technium (Commuter)
    Posts
    553
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Anything cleaner than WD40?

    I was just wondering? The Cranksets and cogs get scrubby looking after a while...

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,134
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    WD40 works well. For an all-out, non-residue laden cleaner, use brake clean. Envionmentally safe types are not quite as effective but do work well though. Brake clean, sold in auto stores or depts. doesn't harm paint or anodized finishes either. To be safe wipe it off sooner than later. It will remove wax and some clearcoats, some, not all.

  3. #3
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,295
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by undisputed83 View Post
    I was just wondering? The Cranksets and cogs get scrubby looking after a while...
    Regular degreaser works fine. Wd-40 is not a good general purpose agent for cleaning bikes.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  4. #4
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Saratoga, CA
    Posts
    11,495
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    OxyClean does a great job of cleaning cranksets and sprockets.

  5. #5
    Senior Member undisputed83's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Westbrook, Maine
    My Bikes
    2011 Litespeed M-1, 1991 Raleigh Technium (Commuter)
    Posts
    553
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    lol... I should have worded the question differently. I was trying to ask if there was an ALTERNATIVE to WD40 to greasing my chain and crankset as opposed to WD40. Something that wouldn't be as gunky in the long run like WD40 can be...

  6. #6
    Bike User
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    My Bikes
    Average Specialized MTB, Giant Innova Hybrid used as a commuter
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    triflow teflon lube works great and teflon resists dirt

    watch this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tSNUCd7Xx1s

  7. #7
    Life is good RonH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Between Crystal River and Hernando, Florida, 6 miles west of the Withlacoochee Trail
    My Bikes
    I've had several since 1999 but have settled on my beloved 2001 Litespeed Tuscany and my latest, a 2013 Cannondale CAAD 10.
    Posts
    13,643
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by undisputed83 View Post
    I was trying to ask if there was an ALTERNATIVE to WD40 to greasing my chain and crankset as opposed to WD40.
    WD40 is NOT a lubricant. It's a solvent. Use TriFlow. That's what we use at the shop I work at.
    My bikes --> 2001 Litespeed Tuscany---2013 Cannondale CAAD 10 2 (5) "Racing Edition"

    Life is like a 10-speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use. ~ Charles Schultz

  8. #8
    Senior Member JonathanGennick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Munising, Michigan, USA
    My Bikes
    Hifi 29er, Stumpy 29er, Rockhopper 29er, ...
    Posts
    1,762
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by undisputed83 View Post
    lol... I should have worded the question differently. I was trying to ask if there was an ALTERNATIVE to WD40 to greasing my chain and crankset as opposed to WD40. Something that wouldn't be as gunky in the long run like WD40 can be...
    Oh, my, yes. I have a drawer full of alternatives. Chain lubes are like religions: there's one out there for everyone .

    During this past summer I've been running Rock & Roll Gold Lube. I'm not sure what it's made of, but I suspect some sort of teflon base. During winter I'll run wet-lube on my around-town bike, because wet-lube holds up better in the snow and the slush.

    My advice is to just try a few different, bike-specific lubes until you find one that you like. You'll get plenty of suggestions, but there's nothing like making a few experiments for yourself.

  9. #9
    Senior Member onbike 1939's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Fife Scotland
    My Bikes
    Airnimal Chameleon; Ellis Briggs; Moulton TSR27
    Posts
    1,890
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RonH View Post
    WD40 is NOT a lubricant. It's a solvent. Use TriFlow. That's what we use at the shop I work at.
    I'm always hearing this recommended but can't find it in the UK. I think it is seen as a good cable lube as well, which would be handy.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Loveland, CO
    My Bikes
    Two LOOK 585s, one KG461
    Posts
    4,987
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by RonH View Post
    WD40 is NOT a lubricant. It's a solvent. Use TriFlow. That's what we use at the shop I work at.
    Wrong. WD-40 contains the same 20-30% oil as my regular homebrew lube. I've actually used it in a long term chain wear test. I found that the oil in WD-40 does not do nearly as good a job of preventing elongation as motor oil or gear lube, thinned 4/1 with naptha. I't's fine for items like derailleur pivots, but not good for a chain.

  11. #11
    My bike's better than me! neil0502's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    My Bikes
    (2) Moots Vamoots, (1) Cannondale T2000 tourer, (1) Diamondback Response Comp mtb
    Posts
    2,041
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DaveSSS View Post
    Wrong. WD-40 contains the same 20-30% oil as my regular homebrew lube.
    Thank you.

    As I put it ... it IS a lubricant, but -- for bikes -- not a great one.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Garfield Cat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Huntington Beach, CA
    My Bikes
    Cervelo Prodigy
    Posts
    5,055
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    On the WD40 website they have a FAQ section. Here's some of it:

    What does WD-40 contain?
    While the ingredients in WD-40 are secret, we can tell you what WD-40 does NOT contain. WD-40 does not contain silicone, kerosene, water, wax, graphite, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), or any known cancer-causing agents.

    What does WD-40 do?
    WD-40 fulfills five basic functions:
    1. CLEANS: WD-40 gets under dirt, grime and grease to clean. It also dissolves adhesives, allowing easy removal of labels, tape and excess bonding material.
    2. DISPLACES MOISTURE: Because WD-40 displaces moisture, it quickly dries out electrical systems to eliminate moisture-induced short circuits.
    3. PENETRATES: WD-40 loosens rust-to-metal bonds and frees stuck, frozen or rusted metal parts.
    4. LUBRICATES: WD-40's lubricating ingredients are widely dispersed and tenaciously held to all moving parts.
    5. PROTECTS: WD-40 protects metal surfaces with corrosion-resistant ingredients to shield against moisture and other corrosive elements.

    What about using WD-40 on my sports equipment?
    WD-40 is safe and effective to use on all types of sporting goods. Use WD-40 on your bike to clean, degrease and lubricate your chain, derailleur, gears, cogs, and moving parts. It will help remove stickers. Use WD-40 to clean and protect your ***. It will prevent corrosion and it won't damage bluing. Spray it on dirt bikes to protect parts and prevent mud from sticking. Use it on watercraft to protect metal surfaces from corrosion and to drive out moisture. WD-40 is also great for cleaning golf clubs and preventing rust on hockey skate blades.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    239
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The only problem with WD-40 is that it's sticky. If you ride in dusty areas the dust will be kicked up by your front wheel, and stick to the chain and gears. There are better chain lubes around. These contain a thick lubricant in a thin carrier so the lube will be taken to the inner part of the chain. Overnight the carrier will evaporate, leaving less sticky material on the outside of the chain. I've been using this type of lube for several years now and other than needing more frequent lubrication it seems to work well. Most of the year the trails here are dusty, so if I use WD-40 the oily dust builds up rapidly. In areas where rain is more of a problem WD-40 or Tri-flow would probably be better choices. You have to suit your lubricant to your needs and how much effort you want to put into the process.

    There are several brands. The one I use is called ATB. After roughly 60 miles of mixed mountain and road riding I apply new lube, one drop to each joint, and let it sit overnight. Wipe it off before the next ride.

    I wish someone would do a controlled test of chain lubes and cleaning techniques. Bicycles are really hard on chains. We need better equipment, especially for mountain riding.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Boise, ID.
    Posts
    1,253
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ugh - WD40 is a water displacer, nothing more. It leaves a gummy residue on whatever its applied too.

    If you need to free rusty bolts - use PBBlaster. Automotive brake cleaner would clean without residue, but isn't the nicest stuff to work with. Simple Green works really well for cleaning bikes. Another tip I got from a local wrench is to use Scrubbing Bubbles (the Bathroom cleaner), seems to do a good job on cassettes/freewheels when they are removed. Get a dedicated chain lube/cleaner for your chains. I also use Rock and Roll Gold, its made locally so I support it.
    1993 Cannondale T700 - 1994 Specialized Rockhopper - Actionbent T1 (Electrification in progress!)

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Loveland, CO
    My Bikes
    Two LOOK 585s, one KG461
    Posts
    4,987
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    More corrections. All oils are sticky with regard to picking up dust. WD-40's oil is very light and no more sticky than any other, but the oil is just too light in weight with no extreme pressure additives like you would find in motor oil or gear lube, so it will not do an adequate job as a chain lube.

    The only lubes that won't attract dust are either dry or waxy and neither produces very good chain life unless applied very frequently.

    With wet lubes, frequent wiping of the exterior with a rag paper shop towel will improve the external cleanliness. I wipe mine after every ride.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,134
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    OP.. first you state scrubby, implying cleaning; then you state greasing, WD40 isn't grease. Then you state gunky in the long run which also doesn't apply to WD40......LOL... TriFlow on the chain and clean the parts with... at times.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    3,975
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by undisputed83 View Post
    lol... I should have worded the question differently. I was trying to ask if there was an ALTERNATIVE to WD40 to greasing my chain and crankset as opposed to WD40. Something that wouldn't be as gunky in the long run like WD40 can be...
    The black gunk comes from inside the chain and is the result of metal wear. I remove the chain every 500 to 650 miles and clean it and the reat of the drive train. WD 40 isn't the best lube for a chain. I use it once in a while when the chain gets wet to help dry it. The WD stands for water displacement.
    I lube my chains with a mix of 4 parts mineral spirits to 1 part chain saw bar oil from Ace.

  18. #18
    Senior Member vettefrc2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Somewhere North of Detroit and moving fast!
    My Bikes
    1976 Fuji America 1980 Fuji America 1984 Fuji America TS V 1982 Fuji Royale II 1993 Trek 970 1997 Trek 5000 2004 Trek Calypso 2007 Trek Portland 2008 Surly LTH
    Posts
    697
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by undisputed83 View Post
    I was just wondering? The Cranksets and cogs get scrubby looking after a while...
    Gasoline. Does a great job of cutting grease....the down side is it can explode with toxic results.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    20,677
    Mentioned
    46 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Debating whether something is a lubricant per se, or not, is a meaningless exercise. Almost anything is a lubricant. The question is whether its a suitable lubricant for a given purpose.

    Lubricant's need to be chosen according to the specific application, and vary tremendously from WD-40 which might be OK for a pin tumbler lock, or derailleur pivots, to heavy greases for large bearings. Just as you use different products in a car - motor oil, gear oil, transmission fluid, axle grease, cable and linkage oils, etc. and different versions of each according to specific conditions - you need different lubricants on a bike. What makes a good cable lube makes a lousy chain lube and vice versa.

    As far as the chain goes, the needs are complex, and choosing a lube requires balancing lubrication properties, weather resistance, dirt attraction/resistance and other needs. Where you ride and what your priorities are will determine your preference in chain lubes. That's why there are so many choices out there, not only in brands but in their approach to problem, from light teflon based products to heavy oils like my stuff, to waxes and wax like products.

    The only thing I can say categorically is that WD-40 is not a suitable chain lube. Where you go from there is up to you.
    Last edited by FBinNY; 10-23-09 at 10:12 AM.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  20. #20
    Senior Member JonathanGennick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Munising, Michigan, USA
    My Bikes
    Hifi 29er, Stumpy 29er, Rockhopper 29er, ...
    Posts
    1,762
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by vettefrc2000 View Post
    Gasoline. Does a great job of cutting grease....the down side is it can explode with toxic results.
    Please don't use gasoline. At least, I wouldn't. Had a friend a few years ago who tried to light his grill using gasoline. Cost him about $30,000 just for the flight to a burn center.

    I usually begin with something like Pedro's Green Fizz (spray bottle) or Orange Peelz. Other brands have similar products.

    For tough dirt, I sometimes use White Lightening Clean Streak. That's potent stuff though.

  21. #21
    Senior Member vettefrc2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Somewhere North of Detroit and moving fast!
    My Bikes
    1976 Fuji America 1980 Fuji America 1984 Fuji America TS V 1982 Fuji Royale II 1993 Trek 970 1997 Trek 5000 2004 Trek Calypso 2007 Trek Portland 2008 Surly LTH
    Posts
    697
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick View Post
    Please don't use gasoline. At least, I wouldn't. Had a friend a few years ago who tried to light his grill using gasoline. Cost him about $30,000 just for the flight to a burn center.

    I usually begin with something like Pedro's Green Fizz (spray bottle) or Orange Peelz. Other brands have similar products.

    For tough dirt, I sometimes use White Lightening Clean Streak. That's potent stuff though.
    I would not recommend WD-40 for starting a grill.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,242
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by undisputed83 View Post
    lol... I should have worded the question differently. I was trying to ask if there was an ALTERNATIVE to WD40 to greasing my chain and crankset as opposed to WD40. Something that wouldn't be as gunky in the long run like WD40 can be...
    WD40 isn't gunky and it's not grease, what EXACTLY are you trying to accomplish?

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    759
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For general grease cleaning, I use an aerosol electrical contact cleaner. Company is Nu-Calgon. Alcohol-based, evaporates quick, leaving no residue of its own to attract more dirt. I have a can in the shop as well as the work truck.
    Just keep blasting until all the greasy junk has come out. But I don't use that on a chain.

  24. #24
    Senior Member ual747captain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    SFO/Burlingame, CA
    Posts
    59
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Interesting!!! A refresher course--who knew?

    Water Displacement #40. The product began from a search for a rust preventative solvent and degreases to protect missile parts. WD-40 was created in 1953 by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket Chemical Company. Its name comes from the project that was to find a water displacement com-
    pound. They were successful with the 40th formulation, thus WD-40. The Corvair Company bought it in bulk to protect their atlas missile parts.

    Ken East (one of the original founders) says there is nothing in WD-40 that would hurt you...' IT IS MADE FROM FISH OIL'

    When you read the 'shower door' part, try it. It's the first thing that has ever cleaned that spotty shower door. If yours is plastic, it works just as well as glass. It is a miracle! Then try it on your stovetop... It is now shinier than it has ever been before.

    1) Protects silver from tarnishing.
    2) Removes road tar and grime from cars.
    3) Cleans and lubricates guitar strings.
    4) Gives floors that ..just-waxed.. sheen without making it slippery.
    5) Keeps flies off cows.
    6) Restores and cleans chalkboards.
    7) Removes lipstick stains
    8) Loosens stubborn zippers.
    9) Untangles jewelry chains.
    10) Removes stains from stainless steel sinks.
    11) Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill.
    12) Keeps ceramic/terra cotta garden pots from oxidizing.
    13) Removes tomato stains from clothing.
    14) Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots.
    15) Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors.
    16) Keeps scissors working smoothly.
    17) Lubricates noisy door hinges on vehicles and doors in homes.
    18) It removes black scuff marks from the kitchen floor! Open some windows if you have a lot of marks.
    19) Bug guts will eat away the finish on your car. Removed quickly, with WD-40!
    20) Gives a children's play gym slide a shine for a super fast slide.
    21) Lubricates gear shift on lawn mowers.
    22) Rids kids rocking chairs and swings of squeaky noises.
    23) Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open.
    24) Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close.
    25) Restores and cleans padded leather dash boards in vehicles, as well as vinyl bumpers.
    26) Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles.
    27) Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans.
    28) Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons, and bicycles for easy handling.
    29) Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly.
    30) Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools.
    31) Removes splattered grease on stove.
    32) Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging.
    33) Lubricates prosthetic limbs.
    34) Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell).
    35) Removes all traces of duct tape.
    36) Folks even spray it on their arms, hands, and knees to relieve arthritis pain .
    37) Florida's favorite use 'Cleans and removes love bugs from grills and bumpers.'
    38) Protects the Statue of Liberty from the elements.
    39) WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a LITTLE on live bait or lures and you will be catching the big one in no time.
    40) Fire ant bites . It takes the sting away immediately and stops the itch.
    41) WD-40 is great for removing crayon from walls. Spray on the mark and wipe with a clean rag.
    42) If you've washed and dried a tube of lipstick with a load of laundry, saturate the lipstick spots with WD-40 and re-wash. Presto! Lipstick is gone!
    43) If you spray WD-40 on the distributor cap, it will displace the moisture and allow the car to start.
    I keep a can of WD-40 in my kitchen cabinet over the stove. It is good for oven burns or any other type of burn. It takes the burned feeling away and heals with NO scarring
    Remember, the basic ingredient is FISH OIL

  25. #25
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,295
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Spraying WD-40 on yourself lmao. Anyone even bother to read the material saftey sheet for that? That is some nasty **** man.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •