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Old 01-05-10, 08:05 AM   #1
sknhgy 
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Rim replacement question

I have ruined a rim that is less than a year old. It is on my mtb. It is a WTB Cross Country Dual Duty rim with spoke eyelets. Not sure how much it cost me.
Anyway, I ride some very hilly country. I was riding recently in the cold and was applying the brakes on the long downhills. My brakepads wore through and deeply scored the rim sidewalls.

He's what I was thinking of doing: Buy a new rim. The same kind. Switch the old rim for the new, then have my LBS do the final truing. Or have them switch the old rim and true it.

Can the spokes be reused, seeing how they are less than a year old?

Any thoughts or suggestions - other than pay more attention to the condition of my brake pads?
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Old 01-05-10, 08:12 AM   #2
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In a situation where it's rim wear not spoke breakage that has caused the need to re-build, I'd have no issue re-using the spokes.
However, if you get a shop to rebuild the wheel, they may insist on new spokes so that they can be confident of the build and offer a warranty on their work.
The plan of getting the same rim and transferring everything is sound. You can even place the new rim over the old rim and transfer the spokes one at a time to save some work with lacing. The shop may be willing to true it up afterwards.
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Old 01-05-10, 09:46 AM   #3
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In a situation where it's rim wear not spoke breakage that has caused the need to re-build, I'd have no issue re-using the spokes.
However, if you get a shop to rebuild the wheel, they may insist on new spokes so that they can be confident of the build and offer a warranty on their work.
The plan of getting the same rim and transferring everything is sound. You can even place the new rim over the old rim and transfer the spokes one at a time to save some work with lacing. The shop may be willing to true it up afterwards.
What would be the easiest way to transfer the spokes? Could someone elaborate on the process, please?

The mechanic at my LBS is very good at truing wheels and he only charges $10. That's why I was thinking of transfering the spokes myself and having him do the truing. Saves me some $$$.
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Old 01-05-10, 09:47 AM   #4
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MTB wheels are usually really cheap on the used market. You might want to look for a used wheel first. Just post a WTB ad in the bicycle section of your local Craigs List. I routinely find donor mountain bikes with good wheels as well.
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Old 01-05-10, 09:54 AM   #5
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What would be the easiest way to transfer the spokes? Could someone elaborate on the process, please?
1. Line up the new rim side-by-side with the old rim so the valve stems are side-by-side.
2. Tape the rims together.
3. One-by-one, remove each spoke nipple, pull the threaded end of spoke out of the old rim, push it into the new rim, replace nipple loosely.
4. Once all spokes have been moved to new rim, untape old rim, and true wheel.
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Old 01-05-10, 10:02 AM   #6
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Shimagnolo has the right idea. It would be a good idea to get a few new nipples incase you round off a few.
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Old 01-05-10, 11:02 AM   #7
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In a situation where it's rim wear not spoke breakage that has caused the need to re-build, I'd have no issue re-using the spokes..
And if the guy has enough miles on a wheel to wear through the rim, in a normal braking situation (probably not the OP's), then you should replace the spokes. Spokes have a fatigue life. They don't last indefinitley.

As an aside, it is *more* labour to reuse spokes than it is to lace up brand new.
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Old 01-05-10, 11:06 AM   #8
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And if the guy has enough miles on a wheel to wear through the rim, in a normal braking situation (probably not the OP's), then you should replace the spokes. Spokes have a fatigue life. They don't last indefinitley.

As an aside, it is *more* labour to reuse spokes than it is to lace up brand new.
This wasn't a "normal" braking situation. Big hills, small mountains. Climbing and braking.
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Old 01-05-10, 11:08 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Shimagnolo View Post
1. Line up the new rim side-by-side with the old rim so the valve stems are side-by-side.
2. Tape the rims together.
3. One-by-one, remove each spoke nipple, pull the threaded end of spoke out of the old rim, push it into the new rim, replace nipple loosely.
4. Once all spokes have been moved to new rim, untape old rim, and true wheel.
I would loosen the spokes first so there is little tension then follow those instructions
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Old 01-05-10, 11:09 AM   #10
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The mechanic at my LBS is very good at truing wheels and he only charges $10. That's why I was thinking of transfering the spokes myself and having him do the truing. Saves me some $$$.
A standard wheel truing is a lot different than tensioning a pre-laced wheel. I'm guessing you'll be out more than $10. However, you will definitely save some money by swapping the rim yourself and only requiring the shop to do the tensioning. I see no reason to consider replacing spokes or nipples.
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Old 01-05-10, 11:10 AM   #11
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I see no reason to consider replacing spokes or nipples.
Really should ask the OP how many miles he has on those wheels. You can put quite a bit of mileage in a year.
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Old 01-05-10, 11:20 AM   #12
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Really should ask the OP how many miles he has on those wheels. You can put quite a bit of mileage in a year.
I was working on the assumption of MTB /= high mileage. Even still, 10,000 miles wouldn't make me run for new spokes if I didn't have any prior issues.
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Old 01-05-10, 01:32 PM   #13
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1000 miles, at the most, on this wheel.
This isn't my only bike.
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