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  1. #1
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    Use XTR rear-drive train with Dura-Ace shifters?

    I have a road bike with 10spd Dura Ace components.

    I am wanting to make this a serious climbing bike by using an XTR rear derailleur and XTR 9-speed cassette.

    I am wondering if that would work OK, after reading Sheldon Brown's page on Alternate Routing: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/derailer...html#alternate

    I think that it might just work OK.

    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
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    . They will If they were 9 speed shifters it would work. 10 I don't think so. If they are bar cons in friction mode they will work. Roger

  3. #3
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    That's my point, from Sheldon's site:

    Shimano originally publicized this as a way to make older Dura-Ace shifters work with newer Shimano derailers, but it is also useful for other applications where you want to make the derailer move slightly farther for each click. This would mainly be when you wanted to use a 9-speed cassette with 10 speed shifters, or 8-speed cassette with 9-speed shifters, or a 7-speed cluster with 8-speed shifters.

  4. #4
    nice idea, poor execution
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    It works, but only for certain values of the word "work".

    If you can accept your shifting sort of working sometimes, go with the alternate routing technique, but don't call it a "serious climbing bike" if you do.

    If you want to continue using your shifters, I would use a 10 speed cassette with the wide ratio you're looking for. IRD's 10s mountain cassettes work reasonably well with a Shimano mountain derailleur. SRAM's XX cassette would probably work even better, they just cost a lot more.
    Kevin Duffy, Harris Cyclery, West Newton, MA.
    blog.harriscyclery.com

  5. #5
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    I have 105 shifters and an xt derailleur and cassette (everything is 9 spd) and i have no problems with shifting.

  6. #6
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottChapman View Post
    I have a road bike with 10spd Dura Ace components.

    I am wanting to make this a serious climbing bike by using an XTR rear derailleur and XTR 9-speed cassette.

    I am wondering if that would work OK, after reading Sheldon Brown's page on Alternate Routing: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/derailer...html#alternate

    I think that it might just work OK.

    Any thoughts?
    The shifters and derailer will play nice. An IRD 10 speed cassette is around $120. Cannondale uses them on their T1 touring bike with Ultegra shifters. The IRD would make life a whole lot simplier
    Stuart Black
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  7. #7
    Gear Combo Guru Chris_W's Avatar
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    Road cycling works best with more tightly-spaced gears than any mountain cassette can give you. You can get low gears without giving up gear spacing by using a triple crankset. If you already have a triple crankset, and still want lower gears then just switch your inner 30-tooth chainring for a 26-tooth, you would not need to change anything else to achieve this (except for adding a chain retention device as a guarantee against dropping your chain when shifting into the small chainring).

  8. #8
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris_W View Post
    Road cycling works best with more tightly-spaced gears than any mountain cassette can give you. You can get low gears without giving up gear spacing by using a triple crankset. If you already have a triple crankset, and still want lower gears then just switch your inner 30-tooth chainring for a 26-tooth, you would not need to change anything else to achieve this (except for adding a chain retention device as a guarantee against dropping your chain when shifting into the small chainring).
    The issue with going to a triple if ScottChapman doesn't already have one is that he would need a new crank, a new front derailer, new shifters (maybe he can score a left hand one only) and maybe a new rear derailer. I'd put the cost at around $700 for all Dura Ace stuff (without a new rear derailer), $900 if he had to buy both shifters. That's a lot of scratch to solve a $200 problem.

    As for road bikes working better with tighter gears, that depends on the use. Cassettes shift so well now that even a wide range one shifts extremely well and extremely quickly. ScottChapman wants something to climb with and he knows best what his needs are.
    Stuart Black
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  9. #9
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    I would agree. My cassette is clean and quick with shifting. The only issue I've had is that the difficulty level between gears is much greater with an mtb cassette, so you have to be a lot more cognizant of whats up the road and shift in advance.

  10. #10
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    The IRD 10-speed cassette with a Shimano mountain type RD would be a much better choice than trying to make a 9-speed cassette work.
    The problem with a mountain type cassette is the big ratio jumps and corresponding cadence jumps from cog to cog. But it you need a cassette with a 32 or 34 cog then you need it. It's really up to your needs. And you could always switch back to a close ratio cassette when needed, the Shimano mountain derailleurs will work with either.

    Al
    Last edited by Al1943; 01-06-10 at 05:58 PM.

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