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Old 01-11-10, 07:44 PM   #1
Chombi 
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So I got myself a wheel truing stand.....finally...

Yes, it's only a cheapy "Bike Doctor" stand, but holy cow, is it worth just having a stand at all, as I would still be looking forlornly at the Mavic GEL280 wheel that I just laced up still wobbling in front of me, not knowing whether to pony up the cash to have it trued and tensioned by my LBS for a big 60+ bucks per wheel to finish up the job and get them road worthy (I laced up quite a few wheels in my time but alwyas had the LBS do the final turing and tensioning). Didn't really want to keep my business away from the LBS, but I figured I already have at least three pairs of wheelsets to take cars of, and I figured that a 52 dollar investment on a stand is more than worth it.
Best thing was, I actually finished truing and tensioning the front wheel of my new GEL280 wheelset within 2 hours first time on the stand. Despite my trepidation about the "black art" that truing and tensioning wheels might involve, it turned out much much easier than I first thought. The secret was to take 1/4 turns on the nipples and not to try and rush the job. Got the wheels tued to very close to zero lateral runout and also very close to roundness. I think I can touch it ou a bit more and get it even better. So, the lesson learned was wheel buiilding can be handled by most bikers themselves just with enough patience and a little investment on a basic truing stand!
Next decision to make is whether to spend on a tension meter. The wheel I just finished seems to be tensioned enough per what I feel on my good trued wheels, but the anal side of me might eventually wrench a few more dollars from my wallet to get it. Any advise on wheter a tension meter is really worth getting??

Chombi

Last edited by Chombi; 01-11-10 at 07:55 PM.
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Old 01-11-10, 08:34 PM   #2
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A tensiometer is a good investment. You can''t go by feel or sound (unless you have perfect pitch). Shraener in his book said he was suprised at the difference it makes.
A dishing tool is nice to have. The cheaper stands leave a little to be desired in the dishing dept.
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Old 01-11-10, 09:47 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Chombi View Post
Best thing was, I actually finished truing and tensioning the front wheel of my new GEL280 wheelset within 2 hours first time on the stand. Despite my trepidation about the "black art" that truing and tensioning wheels might involve, it turned out much much easier than I first thought. The secret was to take 1/4 turns on the nipples and not to try and rush the job. Got the wheels tued to very close to zero lateral runout and also very close to roundness. I think I can touch it ou a bit more and get it even better. So, the lesson learned was wheel buiilding can be handled by most bikers themselves just with enough patience and a little investment on a basic truing stand!
Next decision to make is whether to spend on a tension meter. The wheel I just finished seems to be tensioned enough per what I feel on my good trued wheels, but the anal side of me might eventually wrench a few more dollars from my wallet to get it. Any advise on wheter a tension meter is really worth getting??
Sounds like a good job but what about the dish? Have you checked to see that the rim is centered? Try reversing the wheels on the stand to check dish.
Yes a tension meter is good to have. The Park TM-1 is a good buy at about $60. Release it onto the spokes slowly for accurate measurements

Al
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Old 01-11-10, 10:37 PM   #4
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The TM-1's go out of calibration frequently, FYI. As stated by park you should have a static wheel with which to compare to every so often.
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Old 01-12-10, 01:31 AM   #5
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Arguably, the best is the one from FSA. Based on Jobst Brandt's design - author of The Bicycle Wheel - it is guaranteed to stay in calibration for 10 years from purchase. It is also the most accurate and repeatable of the others on the market. And by no means the most expensive. But considerably more than the Park TS-1:

http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cg...Tension-Meters

And:

http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cg...item_id=FS-STM



Last edited by Panthers007; 01-12-10 at 01:34 AM.
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Old 01-12-10, 04:36 AM   #6
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Arguably, the best is the one from FSA. Based on Jobst Brandt's design - author of The Bicycle Wheel - it is guaranteed to stay in calibration for 10 years from purchase. It is also the most accurate and repeatable of the others on the market. And by no means the most expensive. But considerably more than the Park TS-1:

http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cg...Tension-Meters

And:

http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cg...item_id=FS-STM



I likey
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Old 01-13-10, 12:43 AM   #7
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Sounds like a good job but what about the dish? Have you checked to see that the rim is centered? Try reversing the wheels on the stand to check dish.
Yes a tension meter is good to have. The Park TM-1 is a good buy at about $60. Release it onto the spokes slowly for accurate measurements

Al
Yes, did the wheel flip both to first center the truing head to the stand then to center the rim to the hubs (dishing). If there is anything fussy about the Spin Doctor stand, it's the less than fun time it takes to center the turing head to the stand, but I think I'll get used to it eventually. Only thing I still want to improve on the build is to actually know how much tension the spokes are up to. They do sound and feel about the same as my other wheels, but I just want to make sure I'm still within the range of what's acceptable.

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Old 01-13-10, 12:53 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Panthers007 View Post
Arguably, the best is the one from FSA. Based on Jobst Brandt's design - author of The Bicycle Wheel - it is guaranteed to stay in calibration for 10 years from purchase. It is also the most accurate and repeatable of the others on the market. And by no means the most expensive. But considerably more than the Park TS-1:

http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cg...Tension-Meters

And:

http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cg...item_id=FS-STM


Really impressive looking tension meter indeed, but at $300, it's quite a bit more than I'm able to afford at this time. I think the 50+ Park tool might work well enough for me.

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