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  1. #1
    Medicinal Cyclist Daytrip's Avatar
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    Truing Stand Suggestions?

    We've got enough bikes in the family now that I think a truing stand would be a good investment. At least, that's my excuse for buying a new toy. I see on Ebay that they start at about $70 and up for new ones.

    I have no idea what differentiates a decent stand from a crap one. I'd like to spend less than $100, but I realize that it really doesn't pay to scrimp on tools. I also don't know if it makes sense to look for a used one. I can't imagine there are any wear parts.

    Any suggestions? I guess I could build my own, but I'll probably never get around to it (too busy riding).
    Let your freak flag fly.

  2. #2
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
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    You'll probably see a lot of Park Tool TS-2s, so I thought I'd mention that they can have clearance problems on big 29'er and really big 26'er tires. The outer diameter of the tire is big enough to hit the swingarm. So if you're thinking about a used TS-2 at all, just be aware that you might need to buy the tip extenders and long-reach feeler kit to true certain wheels with the tires on. But they're pretty good stands, really tough under hard use.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Torchy McFlux's Avatar
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    I was going to mention a TS-2 as well, but new ones start at $200, and I don't think used ones are very common.
    I've got a TS-6 at home, but I hate it. Too flimsy and inexact. The TS-7 and TS-8 don't look much better. But after using a TS-2, I'm spoiled.

  4. #4
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    The TS2 is the industry standard, worth the money far from perfect.

    Al

  5. #5
    Senior Member Tunnelrat81's Avatar
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    If you have any interest and basic ability with wood tools, you can build your own for cheap out of 3/4 in. plywood and some simple hardware. This cost me $30 if you include the book that included the plans. This stand is very solid, easy to use but DOES REQUIRE a separate dishing gauge, (also easy to make). I've had some sensitive people squawk at me lately for over-promoting the book that I used, so feel free to PM to request info, lest I be disregarded as a shill.

    -Jeremy


  6. #6
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    Many of us also own trainers. I have a Minora. I have been using it as a side to side truing stand. It wouldn't take much to make a lateral gauge as well. Given this idea, can someone suggest how to convert a trainer to a truing stand.
    This way it is a 2 for 1 deal.

  7. #7
    cab horn
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daytrip View Post
    We've got enough bikes in the family now that I think a truing stand would be a good investment. At least, that's my excuse for buying a new toy. I see on Ebay that they start at about $70 and up for new ones.

    I have no idea what differentiates a decent stand from a crap one. I'd like to spend less than $100, but I realize that it really doesn't pay to scrimp on tools. I also don't know if it makes sense to look for a used one. I can't imagine there are any wear parts.

    Any suggestions? I guess I could build my own, but I'll probably never get around to it (too busy riding).
    If you're not planning on building wheels frequently, zip tie on a fork is all the "truing stand" you need.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daytrip View Post
    We've got enough bikes in the family now that I think a truing stand would be a good investment. At least, that's my excuse for buying a new toy. I see on Ebay that they start at about $70 and up for new ones.

    I have no idea what differentiates a decent stand from a crap one. I'd like to spend less than $100, but I realize that it really doesn't pay to scrimp on tools. I also don't know if it makes sense to look for a used one. I can't imagine there are any wear parts.

    Any suggestions? I guess I could build my own, but I'll probably never get around to it (too busy riding).
    Forget the Park Tool TS-2, it is probably a good wheelbuilding stand, but way overkill for what you describe as your need. I have build dozens of wheels on my cheap Minoura Workman stand without any problems; It is cheap, it is sturdy enough, it is foldable and stores away easily, and it allows me to true wheels to absurd trueness tolerances. I like good tools too and have no problems paying more for quality, but for home mechanics the price difference between a Minoura and and Park Tool TS-2 is much better spend on Jobst Brandt's or Roger Musson's book on wheelbuilding and a good rear hub.


    http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...6_10000_201591

    http://www.amazon.com/Pyramid-Deluxe...3794443&sr=1-8


    Avoid using the self-centering abilities of most truing stands, and get a proper dishing gauge.

    --
    Regards

  9. #9
    Senior Member kamtsa's Avatar
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    I was in the same situation and after a checking around I ordered this from Nashbar yesterday http://www.minourausa.com/english/to...ruepro2-e.html

    I also ordered the Grizzly dial guage as described here http://www.chc-3.com/pub/wheel_stand.htm

    Kam

  10. #10
    A little North of Hell
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    $$$

    Villum
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    XXXI

  11. #11
    Senior Member Chombi's Avatar
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    I just got myself a Spin Doctor truing stand. Yes, it's a cheapy (Got it for 52 bucks on sale at my local PBS) compared to the Park Tools truing stand, but it's more than adequate for the home truing duties most of us need a stand for. Best thing about the stand is it folds up nice and flat for storage so it does not take up any work space when you're not using it.

    Chombi

  12. #12
    Senior Member wrobertdavis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tunnelrat81 View Post
    If you have any interest and basic ability with wood tools, you can build your own for cheap out of 3/4 in. plywood and some simple hardware. This cost me $30 if you include the book that included the plans. This stand is very solid, easy to use but DOES REQUIRE a separate dishing gauge, (also easy to make). I've had some sensitive people squawk at me lately for over-promoting the book that I used, so feel free to PM to request info, lest I be disregarded as a shill.

    -Jeremy
    I also built this one and I am very, very happy with it. I think it works better than any commercial stand available. Its also very fast to setup and not fussy at all. I built a separate dishing tool as well and its very fast to use.

    Bob
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    I ride 5000 miles/year in Texas with wind, rain, heat, armadillos, and wild boars.

  13. #13
    Reeks of aged cotton duck Hydrated's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by operator View Post
    If you're not planning on building wheels frequently, zip tie on a fork is all the "truing stand" you need.
    +1

    I used an upturned fork mounted in a board for years until I came across a great deal on a TS-2. It's not the most convenient way in the world to true a wheel, but it's cheap and gets the job done.
    It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.-Aristotle

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tunnelrat81 View Post
    If you have any interest and basic ability with wood tools, you can build your own for cheap out of 3/4 in. plywood and some simple hardware. This cost me $30 if you include the book that included the plans. This stand is very solid, easy to use but DOES REQUIRE a separate dishing gauge, (also easy to make). I've had some sensitive people squawk at me lately for over-promoting the book that I used, so feel free to PM to request info, lest I be disregarded as a shill.

    -Jeremy

    That's the one I like, but I don't have the woodworking capability to make one. I use a radial indicator like the one on the picture, and a dial indicator for lateral truing, all with a recycled fork. It all works perfectly. The fork is actually better than most commercial stands, because you can push the rim sideways to relieve tension while you are making adjustments. I also like using the dial indicator because recording the initial measurements and then going back and re-measuring has given me a lot of confidence that I'm building strong, stable wheels.

    em

  15. #15
    Senior Member Milice's Avatar
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    Where can the plans for the wooden stand be found?
    If it looks like the $3000 bikes but costs less than a decent helmet, it probably isn't a wise investment.


    http://keith-crossreference.blogspot.com/

  16. #16
    Senior Member Tunnelrat81's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milice View Post
    Where can the plans for the wooden stand be found?
    http://www.wheelpro.co.uk/wheelbuilding/book.php

    And you can buy and have the .pdf file immediately.

    -Jeremy

  17. #17
    Medicinal Cyclist Daytrip's Avatar
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    Thanks for all your suggestions. I like 'em all. I'll have to try the zip tie on my old Viscount "Fork of Death."

    I also like the wooden homemade job, but I'd spend as much on a bandsaw to do the project as a new truing stand would go for.
    Let your freak flag fly.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Tunnelrat81's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daytrip View Post
    Thanks for all your suggestions. I like 'em all. I'll have to try the zip tie on my old Viscount "Fork of Death."

    I also like the wooden homemade job, but I'd spend as much on a bandsaw to do the project as a new truing stand would go for.
    No need for a bandsaw. The only curved cut on this stand was the back side of the "radial gauge" and is purely optional. It could easily be cut as straight pieces on Table and Hand saws. Even the tapers on the upright towers cane be left out. You could basically cut this whole stand out of square pieces, just to the proper lengths, and tie it all together with glue/screws as I did. You can round the corners with sanding blocks or a belt or table sander if you have access to one. The ONLY challenge would be to cut the slots into the base for the moving tower. I used a table router, but where there's a will.... The only real need for fancy tools would be your own visual standards and OCD.... Of course I realize that we are on a cyclist forum...so maybe I take this all back. =)

    *edit* I've seen multiple different "Versions" of this stand, built out of everything from hard/beautiful stained woods to MDF. The design is structurally sound enough that with any reasonably strong material, you could build yourself a stand that would be quite sturdy for truing. Aside from rounding the corners and quickly sanding each piece by hand before assembling, I didn't put any effort into making this stand look nice. 3/4 in. ply wood was an extra scrap cut out of "non-finish" grade plywood, and as you can see there was some filler/"boat" patches visible in various places in the wood. It really just depends on whether you're wanting a tool that will do what you need well....or one that will do the same AND look good doing it.

    -Jeremy
    Last edited by Tunnelrat81; 01-18-10 at 02:42 PM.

  19. #19
    Medicinal Cyclist Daytrip's Avatar
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    Well, I've got a table saw and a drill press, so that sounds like a viable option. Thanks. Yours looks nice, BTW.
    Let your freak flag fly.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
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    The latest version of the Minoura stand is on sale at Nashbar for $69.99.

  21. #21
    50/50 Road/eBike Commuter kmcrawford111's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tunnelrat81 View Post

    If you built this one, color me thoroughly impressed. Absolutely beautiful.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Tunnelrat81's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmcrawford111 View Post
    If you built this one, color me thoroughly impressed. Absolutely beautiful.
    Thank you, but it didn't look half a nice until I put the wheel and colorful spoke wrenches on the front of it. Before that it was just finished plywood screwed together. =)

  23. #23
    Senior Member Chop61's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tunnelrat81 View Post
    If you have any interest and basic ability with wood tools, you can build your own for cheap out of 3/4 in. plywood and some simple hardware. This cost me $30 if you include the book that included the plans. This stand is very solid, easy to use but DOES REQUIRE a separate dishing gauge, (also easy to make). I've had some sensitive people squawk at me lately for over-promoting the book that I used, so feel free to PM to request info, lest I be disregarded as a shill.

    -Jeremy

    Y'know Jeremy, someone could make good money building up those stands and selling them. Love to have one, but I barely have space for my bikes and have to rearrange my living room to work on them. Wheel truing is done on the kitchen counter. I guess my point is, I can't do woodworking, and when I took the plans to a cabinetmaker, he balked.
    Mussen's book is great though.
    When I was young I prayed to God for a new bike. Then I figured out God didn't work that way, so I stole one and prayed for forgiveness.

  24. #24
    cycling 4 fun
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    You'll probably see a lot of Park Tool TS-2s, so I thought I'd mention that they can have clearance problems on big 29'er and really big 26'er tires. The outer diameter of the tire is big enough to hit the swingarm. So if you're thinking about a used TS-2 at all, just be aware that you might need to buy the tip extenders and long-reach feeler kit to true certain wheels with the tires on. But they're pretty good stands, really tough under hard use.
    The new Park TS 2.2 will accept a 29er. I sold my old TS 2 for this reason

  25. #25
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bubba Zanetti View Post
    The new Park TS 2.2 will accept a 29er. I sold my old TS 2 for this reason


    My new TS-2.2 will be arriving via UPS tomorrow, and will be inheriting the custom speed dial setup from my TS-2.



    If anyone's interested in making one of those, here's a rendering that may help. The dial indicator mounts in the blue tube, which moves with the axle support (red) as it pivots on the green pivot, while the dial indicator's tip rests against the yellow channel. The readout is arbitrary, just put marks on the dial face to show whatever widths you find useful (100mm, 126mm, 130mm, 135mm, etc).



    For the flywheel, get a threaded hexagon tube that fits the threaded rod and bolt a flywheel to the other end, basically. A machinist pal made this one for me.

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