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Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

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Old 02-14-10, 12:32 PM   #1
bagel007
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My first flat -- how to fix it?

After riding my Giant Cypress for almost a year I got my first flat. After leaving the bike in the garage for a couple days (as the snow arrived) I've noticed that the rear wheel's tire is completelly deflated!

I'm sure it's simple, but could you please provide me with some links how to do it the right way?

So far I studies the following ones:

http://sheldonbrown.com/flats.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FzqjoFAXA5I
TIRE AND INNER TUBE REPLACEMENT (Park Tools)

Thanks in advance!
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Old 02-14-10, 12:42 PM   #2
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whats wrong with sheldon brown or parktool's site?
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Old 02-14-10, 12:44 PM   #3
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I'd say it's time for a little hands on. You've seen everything I would suggest.

Have you got your patch kit or replacement tube?

Have at it.
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Old 02-14-10, 12:48 PM   #4
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whats wrong with sheldon brown or parktool's site?
First, does it matter where to start removing the tire/tube from the wheel? At the valve? Anywhere?
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Old 02-14-10, 12:50 PM   #5
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I'd say it's time for a little hands on. You've seen everything I would suggest.

Have you got your patch kit or replacement tube?

Have at it.
I got the tools (levers) and replacement tube. No patch kit, but the tube the right one. I'll patch it later.
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Old 02-14-10, 01:21 PM   #6
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It's really not all that specific of a process. Get the tire half way off the wheel (1 bead). Peel out the tube. Actually, you know what, just watch this video:


Patching is pretty simple, and I don't remember if Sasha goes over it. Get your tube. Pump it up and find the leak. Circle the area where the hole is. I do like a quarter sized circle so I can find it later. Abrade the area of the hole with some coarse sand paper. Put glue on the tube where the hole is. Wait until it begins to turn opaque, and then put your patch on. I clamp the whole thing in a vice so the glue and patch get really set to the tube.
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Old 02-14-10, 02:14 PM   #7
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After riding my Giant Cypress for almost a year I got my first flat. After leaving the bike in the garage for a couple days (as the snow arrived) I've noticed that the rear wheel's tire is completelly deflated!
OK, flat tire fixed. It was easier and faster than I've expected. I was surprised that the rim strip was stuck to the tube close to the valve. I had to peel it off carefully before removing the tube.

I couldn't find any debris inside the tire or anything that could have caused puncturing of the tube. I put the tire back without any tools (levers) and inspected if the tube is completelly inside and the tire beads in place.

After all that I inflated the old tube.Then I noticed that it is leaking through a very small hole. It's odd as I couldn't see anything like that when I was inspecting the tire.

Anyway, thanks you all for your help.
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Old 02-14-10, 02:27 PM   #8
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Toss the old tube. They run around $5 each. No biggy.
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Old 02-14-10, 03:52 PM   #9
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Somebody posted a great tip the other day on finding a sharp in your tire that your eye or finger may miss. Run a cotton ball around the inside and see if any fibers are pulled off.

Put your tire's label at the valve stem. Makes it quick to find when you go to inflate your tire and if you have re-occurring leak in your tube you can figure out where to look on your tire for the culprit.

Good luck with your riding.
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Old 02-14-10, 04:29 PM   #10
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Somebody posted a great tip the other day on finding a sharp in your tire that your eye or finger may miss. Run a cotton ball around the inside and see if any fibers are pulled off.

Put your tire's label at the valve stem. Makes it quick to find when you go to inflate your tire and if you have re-occurring leak in your tube you can figure out where to look on your tire for the culprit.
Great tips, thanks! I was planning to mark the position of the tire at the valve stem with a piece of Duct Tape, but it wouldn't stick. If I have done so, I would know now where the pin/needle/debris (or whatever punctured the tube) penetrated the tire and could inspect the tire closely at that point.

I also was looking for an arrow on either side of the tire to indicate the direction of the tire, but couldn't find one. The Park Tools guide is saying that not all tires have that marking. Though the pattern on my tires is one-directional and pointing in the direction the wheel turns, so that helped me to install the tires in the right direction.

I wonder if there are markers to write on tires (on their walls), so I know at which point was the valve stem after I removed them from the wheels.

Last edited by bagel007; 02-14-10 at 04:30 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 02-14-10, 04:58 PM   #11
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I wonder if there are markers to write on tires (on their walls), so I know at which point was the valve stem after I removed them from the wheels.
This is the only marker you need.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
Put your tire's label at the valve stem. Makes it quick to find when you go to inflate your tire and if you have re-occurring leak in your tube you can figure out where to look on your tire for the culprit.
Like this.
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Old 02-14-10, 05:05 PM   #12
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It is easy to patch a tube if you have a kit. Use sandpaper to remove the mold release on the tube and put enough glue over the hole to cover the patch let the glue dry for at least 5 minutes and place the patch over the hole. Use a rounded piece of plastic or metal to work the patch down. Inflate to make sure the job was done right, fold it up and you are ready for the next one.
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Old 02-14-10, 07:17 PM   #13
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ALWAYS determine the cause of the flat before you put it all back together. To do so, use the valve as an index mark to line up the tube with the tire. Once you find the hole check to find where the hole lines-up with the tire. Check that spot for an embedded sharp object.

Take the time to do this and you'll save yourself much aggravation.
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Old 02-14-10, 07:39 PM   #14
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Newbie question: I have a cheap but great Sun EZ1 recumbent, but I think this question applies to any bike. What gear should the bike be in when the rear tire is removed? I imagine the chain would be a pain to put back on if the gear is wrong. Am I right?
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Old 02-14-10, 07:42 PM   #15
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Put the rear wheel chain on the small sprocket before removing.
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Old 02-14-10, 08:11 PM   #16
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Start a new thread when you have questions. You'll get way quicker results.
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Old 02-14-10, 08:22 PM   #17
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its a easy job, first get the wheel of where the flat is, get it out of the bike, you might have quick release making it easy, or you have to release the bolts that hold the wheel, also you might need to release your brake pads tension.


Once you get the wheel with the flat tire still in tact. you will need your tire remover tool, this is two stick looking levers, put these anywhere where the tire touches the rim, put the other lever near the first lever, then go around in a circle so the tire gets loose from the rim, once this happens you will be able to remove the tire much easier, then get to the tube and yank that POS, lol just kidding, remove it first from the valve and remove the tube, get your new tube, put some talc powder or baby powder, and spread it over the new tube for easier insertion or you dont have to put the powder.

then blow up the tube with a tire pump only until the tube forms a loosely filled tube do not pump air until its fully formed thou. This is done to make it easier to have the tube stay on the rim while you put the tire over both.


ok now first start with the valve, put the valve where the rim has a hole, pass it through there and make sure its not bending or not place nice and tight. then begin to place the tube around the entire rim.

once the tube is on the rim, you are going to have to put the tire on top of the tube and on the wheel. place the tire one side at a time once it is nice and placed on a side slide in the other side until the tire is fully place on the rim and on top of the tube.

you might need to use your tire lever for the final section of tire.


once the tire is placed on the rim, put some more air on the tube and tire about 5 psi, and bounce the tire on the floor for a couple of times. Once this is done, go ahead and put the amount of PSI you want. the recommended psi levels are on the tire, where you can see words and stuff etched on the tire, it will say something like PSI 60 - 75 or something.
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Old 02-14-10, 09:59 PM   #18
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once the tire is placed on the rim, put some more air on the tube and tire about 5 psi, and bounce the tire on the floor for a couple of times.
Why?
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Old 02-14-10, 10:13 PM   #19
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Why?
Sets the tire bead against the rim hook.

Be sure the tire bead is even (symmetrical) around the rim and the tube is not hanging out anywhere before you fully inflate it.....otherwise BOOM.
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Old 02-14-10, 10:16 PM   #20
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Sets the tire bead against the rim hook. Be sure the tire bead is even (symmetrical) around the rim and the tube is not hanging out anywhere before you fully inflate it.....otherwise BOOM.
Oh, thanks. I just push the bead in and look at the space between the rim and the bead.
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Old 02-15-10, 09:54 AM   #21
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Put the rear wheel chain on the small sprocket before removing.
Why? Is it matter of convenience? If I know and remember on what sprocke to put the chain back, does it matter where the chain was before removing the wheel?

Last edited by bagel007; 02-17-10 at 11:04 PM.
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Old 02-15-10, 10:03 AM   #22
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Why? Is it matter of convenience? If I know and remember on what sprocket to put the chain back, does it matter where was the chain before removing the wheel?
When the chain is on the small cog it is easier to remove and replace without having to touch the chain.
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Old 02-15-10, 10:08 AM   #23
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Another point is to SHIFT the chain to the small/outside cog. As davidad said, you can drop the wheel without having to touch the chain. Less stress on the rear mech, also.
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Old 02-15-10, 08:17 PM   #24
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Thanks a lot everyone. Sorry I didn't start a new thread for my question. I'm still learning mechanics of bikes and forums. Now I know. Everybody on here is really helpful.
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