Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Senior Member TromboneAl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Far, Far Northern California
    My Bikes
    1997 Specialized M2Pro
    Posts
    2,774
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Brake Cable Housing Through Top Tube

    I just bought a used bike that has the brake cable routed through the top tube. I will be replacing the cable and housing. I assume that there's some kind of guide inside, so that when feed the new housing in, it will automagically come out the other end. Yes?
    My Book: Drive, Ride, Repeat: The Mostly-True Account of a Cross-Country Car and Bicycle Adventure

  2. #2
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,298
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by TromboneAl View Post
    I just bought a used bike that has the brake cable routed through the top tube. I will be replacing the cable and housing. I assume that there's some kind of guide inside, so that when feed the new housing in, it will automagically come out the other end. Yes?
    It depends on the frame. Some frames will not run housing through the top tube all the way, some will not. The ones that don't will have (obviously) stops near the stem and one near the seatpost - some of these will be removeable so you can easily snake a cable through, a spoke hook end will help you fish the cable through easily.

    Other frames that run full housing may have an internal guide (kuota). It will be immediately obvious which system it is as soon as you start taking it apart. I suggest you do not remove the inner wire if it runs cable and housing the whole way - you can use that as a guide for the housing greatly simplfying the repair.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    24,770
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It does indeed depend on the frame. Older Trek bonded Al frames did NOT have a cable guide inside the top tube and if you pulled both the housing and cable out, you faced a fishing expedition to replace them.

    I recommend pulling out ONLY the housing at first. Then thread the new housing back into the frame using the inner cable as a guide. Finally, replace the inner cable. This is the safest approach whether there is or is not an internal guide tube.

  4. #4
    DOS
    DOS is offline
    Senior Member DOS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Arlington, VA USA
    Posts
    1,188
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Internal routing is a pain. Here is what has worked for me.

    Disconnect cable at brake. If housing goes all the way through tube, slide it out toward back of bike (leaving cable is place). Thread bottom end of old cable a little ways into top end of new housing and tape off. Then, pull cable out of tube toward front of bike, allowing it to pull new housing through the tube with it. Then, slide new cable through new housing from lever.

    If your bike has stops in the top tube, so housing does not go all the way through the tube, but runs from lever to tube and tube to caliper, I still use housing to guide new cable through the tube by threading a length of housing temporarily through the tube to serve as a cable guide. You will have to pry out the stops from either side of the top tube, then do as described above to snake housing temporarily into tube and slide cable back though -- being sure to snake cable through exterior permanent housing (from lever to stop) and then the loose cable stop before entering the temp housing you're using as a guide through the tube. Then, once cable is through the temp interior housing, pull that housing out of the tube toward the back of the bike, reaffix stops into the tube, and attach cable to brake as appropriate.
    My Opinions > My Knowledge

  5. #5
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DOS View Post
    Internal routing is a pain.
    Some is, some isn't. There's a a guide inside the top tube on my Pinarello frame that makes it super easy to run the cable.


  6. #6
    DOS
    DOS is offline
    Senior Member DOS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Arlington, VA USA
    Posts
    1,188
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by well biked View Post
    Some is, some isn't. There's a a guide inside the top tube on my Pinarello frame that makes it super easy to run the cable.

    Gotta love Italian Steel. Kestral carbon, no so much.
    My Opinions > My Knowledge

  7. #7
    biked well well biked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    6,712
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DOS View Post
    Gotta love Italian Steel. Kestral carbon, no so much.
    THAT, I will agree with.

  8. #8
    Gears? CliftonGK1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    My Bikes
    '08 Surly Cross-Check, 2011 Redline Conquest Pro, 2012 Spesh FSR Comp EVO, 2009 Spesh Singlecross, 2011 RM Flow1
    Posts
    11,304
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by well biked View Post
    Some is, some isn't. There's a a guide inside the top tube on my Pinarello frame that makes it super easy to run the cable.
    Lucky!
    No internal guide on my PDG Series-5.
    "I feel like my world was classier before I found cyclocross."
    - Mandi M.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Wilmington, DE
    My Bikes
    2003 Specialized Hardrock, 2004 LOOK KG386i, 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1
    Posts
    8,767
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    It does indeed depend on the frame. Older Trek bonded Al frames did NOT have a cable guide inside the top tube and if you pulled both the housing and cable out, you faced a fishing expedition to replace them.
    It wasn't a bonded aluminum frame but the Trek 1400 (I think that was the model number) that I tuned up for a friend had no internal guide either. Without really thinking, I pulled the housing and cable all the way out. It was pretty easy to reroute by pulling the seatpost out and using a stick to push the housing towards the exit hole. The ability to do this will depend on where the housing exits the top tube though. On the 1400, it exits right near the seat tube junction making this an easy task.

    Pic found through Google:


  10. #10
    Senior Member TromboneAl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Far, Far Northern California
    My Bikes
    1997 Specialized M2Pro
    Posts
    2,774
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes, that's how mine is:

    Cable 003.jpg
    My Book: Drive, Ride, Repeat: The Mostly-True Account of a Cross-Country Car and Bicycle Adventure

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    24,770
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Trek 1400 was/is indeed a bonded Al frame but the lugs are internal and not obvious. I have a 1420 which was the triple-crank version of the same bike. TromboneAl's bike is one of the later carbon tube/aluminum lug frames Trek build for a few years after the bonded 1200/1400 all-Al frames were discontinued.

    The only thing that makes replacing their rear brake cable "an easy task" is the fact that the top tube is open at the seat tube junction so you can remove the seatpost and insert a finger into the top tube to guide the cable out of the rear hole. It is still a bit of a hassle and leaving the inner wire in place to guide new housing is still less trouble.

  12. #12
    SE Wis dedhed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    My Bikes
    '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400
    Posts
    2,094
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I did my Trek 1000 just the other day. I pulled the old inner out and threaded the new inner through the old housing. The new inner was then the guide for the new housing. took just seconds to do.
    '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Wilmington, DE
    My Bikes
    2003 Specialized Hardrock, 2004 LOOK KG386i, 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1
    Posts
    8,767
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    The Trek 1400 was/is indeed a bonded Al frame but the lugs are internal and not obvious. I have a 1420 which was the triple-crank version of the same bike.
    Interesting. What did they use to smooth the joints between the tubes on the outside?

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    24,770
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
    Interesting. What did they use to smooth the joints between the tubes on the outside?
    They did a good job didn't they? The lugs are internal and the tubes butt up against eachother and I presume the adhesive and paint fill in the seams "seamlessly". Here is a reproduction of the 1992 Trek catalog specifying that the 1400 and 1420 are "bonded aluminum". Scroll down to page 9 to find them.

    http://www.bikeman.com/attic/catalog...992catalog.pdf

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Wilmington, DE
    My Bikes
    2003 Specialized Hardrock, 2004 LOOK KG386i, 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1
    Posts
    8,767
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hillrider, thanks for the link. I agree on the nice job hiding the lugged construction. It's always fun to look back at those cycling catalogs and see how much things have changed. Check out those New Balance sneakers and toe clips on the guy riding the full suspension MTB

  16. #16
    Senior Member TromboneAl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Far, Far Northern California
    My Bikes
    1997 Specialized M2Pro
    Posts
    2,774
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    BTW, the trick of using the old cable to guide the housing did not work so well, but using my pinkie finger to guide it (since the exit is so close the seat tube) worked very well.
    My Book: Drive, Ride, Repeat: The Mostly-True Account of a Cross-Country Car and Bicycle Adventure

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •