Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    NYCPistaRider
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    167
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Learning to work on my bike in NYC

    I am looking to learn bike repair and maintenance in NYC. I am assembling parts for a project and I think a great way to learn would be to hire a mechanic to spend a day building up the bike with me. Anyone have leads on a good way to do this? Any other suggestions on how to learn?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Astra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    My house, England
    Posts
    461
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Be careful if you're going to wander around NYC telling people you want to hire a 'mechanic' - you may be misconstrued!
    Oooooh yes, one day I will rid the world of showers and the bath shall come to dominate the cleansing habits of all the human race!

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Montreal
    My Bikes
    Peugeot Hybrid, Minelli Hybrid
    Posts
    6,521
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Download barnet's manual, sheldon brown's articles and park tool instructions. Pick up 3 abandoned bikes from the street or charity shops, take them apart and build up 1 bike from the best parts.

  4. #4
    dangerous with tools halfbiked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    minneapolis
    My Bikes
    fat, long, single & fast
    Posts
    4,502
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Is this for a SS/fixie project? If so, you'll want to talk to a mechanic who has experience with such beasts. Possibly look for info from courier types for leads on a good wrench.

    Otherwise, my recommendation would be to acquire an old bike & learn on that. Start with a tuneup; once you get competent with minor chores, start taking pieces off & reinstalling them. My brother, myself & friends learned much about bikes by doing this (often incorrectly) in our youth. By practicing on a junker you can hopefully avoid doing permanent damage to your project bike. You can also customize your 'lessons' as appropriate for your project bike. i.e. if its a fixie/SS, you don't have to mess with derailers.

    Lastly, read. I bought 'Anybody's Bike Book' the author of which I cannot recollect (in fact, title may be Everybody's Bike Book). Its well written, though a little dated. Covers basic concepts well, but does not cover latest & greatest gadgets. What i've seen of the PDF available in this forum is good too.

    Good Luck-
    Brian

  5. #5
    more ape than man timmhaan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    nyc
    Posts
    8,093
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i agree with everyone else. a junker is the way to go. even if you just take it apart, clean it, and put it back together with the same parts that will teach you a lot. you can find bikes for as little as 10 bucks if you comb through the flea markets.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •