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Old 02-23-10, 12:41 PM   #1
jeremyb
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Pedro's Chain Tool is awesome!

I just wanted to say, that I've had this Pedro's chain tool for about 2 years and it works better than any other chain tool I've used in the past.

It pops chains with minimal effort (a lot of leverage) and works as well as the day I got it still. My previous experience was with the small Park chain breaker which should only be considered as an emergency breaker for the seat pack.

Anyway, just wanted to share!
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Old 02-23-10, 04:31 PM   #2
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that pedros one is crap. pins break all the time
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Old 02-23-10, 04:43 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by jeremyb View Post
My previous experience was with the small Park chain breaker which should only be considered as an emergency breaker for the seat pack.

Anyway, just wanted to share!
That's pretty much all the Park small chain tool is intended for. Get one of the Park shop-grade chain tools and let us know how it compairs.
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Old 02-23-10, 05:07 PM   #4
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The head on that thing looks like it's right off the super nice Shimano tool. If only they would loose all the yellow handles.
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Old 02-23-10, 05:46 PM   #5
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+1 The Pedros one is crap if you use it much.

+1 One of the better Parks chain tools are great, but not that small compact one.
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Old 02-23-10, 06:30 PM   #6
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+1 for Shimano. At first I got a no name from my LBS. POS. Got the Shimano and big difference.
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Old 02-23-10, 07:09 PM   #7
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Of course there's always Cyclo. Some people consider them 'single use' tools.
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Old 02-23-10, 08:10 PM   #8
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Of course there's always Cyclo. Some people consider them 'single use' tools.
That was my first chain tool and I used it until I discovered how much better a shop quality tool could be. They held up ok on the Sedis and similar "reusable pin" chains until the late '80's when the rivited pin chains overmatched them.
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Old 02-24-10, 08:44 AM   #9
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+1 One of the better Parks chain tools are great, but not that small compact one.
Why?
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Old 02-24-10, 10:14 AM   #10
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I have the Park CT-5 and I think it's ideal for the home mechanic. It works fine, and it's compact and light enough to take with you on rides, if you're so inclined. If I was working in a shop, maybe I'd want a heavier-duty one, but for the typical cyclist who changes a chain maybe once a year, the CT-5 is swell.
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Old 02-24-10, 10:26 AM   #11
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I believe that the only differences between all those tools is toughness and longevity. I have a cheap Nashbar chain tool that looks identical and works fine, but it will most likely not survive long if it was used daily. Most cheap bike tools are like that, they work fine but won't last long under heavy use. So as a home mechanic with 3 bikes I see no reason in spending large bucks on expensive tools. If you run any kind of shop or even maintain a lot of bikes for friends and family then the better tools make sense.

Adam
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Old 02-24-10, 12:00 PM   #12
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The Topeak ChainBot has served me well for going on 6 years now. Really well constructed.

Chain breaking is easier with a little prep work. Flex the chain a bit, give it a good shot of WD-40 thena go at it with the chain tool.
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Old 02-24-10, 01:46 PM   #13
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Pedro's Chain Tool is the same one I have it works great for me as well.
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Old 02-24-10, 02:32 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AdamDZ View Post
I believe that the only differences between all those tools is toughness and longevity. I have a cheap Nashbar chain tool that looks identical and works fine, but it will most likely not survive long if it was used daily. Most cheap bike tools are like that, they work fine but won't last long under heavy use. So as a home mechanic with 3 bikes I see no reason in spending large bucks on expensive tools. If you run any kind of shop or even maintain a lot of bikes for friends and family then the better tools make sense.

Adam
Exactly. I work on bikes enough that the lighter duty tools just do not last. I have had to step up in tool quality (and price) quite a bit to get adequate durability. But to the average bike owner, the lighter duty tools are more than adequate.

I am a home mechanic, but I work on about 100 bikes a year. So stuff wears out.

One nice thing about the Nashbar stuff (which is no better) is that Performance Bicycle will sometimes stand behind them. They replaced my Nashbar cable tool for example.
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