Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Home alone
    My Bikes
    Trek 4300 X 2. Trek 1000, Trek 6000
    Posts
    6,021
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am ready to start making some of my own minor repairs. I don't want to invest all at once in a bunch of tools. I basically want to be able to do some of the more novice types of repairs. I presently have standard work tools in my garage along with a couple bike multi-tools. One also has a chain tool but i think it might not be very good. I have had a hard time replacing pins with it so far anyway.

    I can adjust my deraillers and am now ready to tackle other tasks. Last week i repacked my rear hub. Yeah!!! I know that i need a lockring removal tool to remove the cassette. I have an old chain that i plan to use for a chainwhip. I also have a bench vice. I also plan to get some brake and derailler cables and cable cutters.

    What else do i need to get for novice repairs? I am not ready to tackle things like bottom bracket and headset yet. Although once more comfortable, i will. Also i was wondering if there are any small parts to keep on hand. In my line of work, i carry a tackle box with lots of odds and ends to repair things.
    What odds and ends do i need for the bike? Where can i get ball bearings online? etc. Any tips would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    8speed DinoSORAs Ed Holland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Oxford, UK or Mountain View, Ca
    Posts
    2,748
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Good question Ranger,

    Off the top of my head, here are a few things that would make life easier. I'm sure other forum members will fill in anything I've forgotten and keep it to bike specific stuff, since you mention that you have a selection of "standard" tools:

    Tools:
    Cone spanner
    Pedal spanner
    Cassette lockring remover and chainwhip (you mentioned these already)
    Crank remover
    Spoke key
    Tire levers


    Parts:
    Spare cones for wheel bearings (Shimano cones can be obtained, part numbers can be found on the shimano website)
    Ball bearings (size as appropriate, available from a bike shop)
    Brake pads, cables, cable end protectors etc.
    Spokes - bike shop should be able to help find the right size(s)
    Inner tubes

    Thats about it off the top of my head

    Good luck - it's always satisfying to make one's own repairs on the bike.

    Cheers,

    Ed
    Get a bicycle. You will certainly not regret it, if you live.

  3. #3
    dangerous with tools halfbiked's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    minneapolis
    My Bikes
    fat, long, single & fast
    Posts
    4,502
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Are pedal spanners more necessary for some pedals than others? I was readily able use a normal 9/16 wrench to remove pedals yesterday.

  4. #4
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,428
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by halfbiked
    Are pedal spanners more necessary for some pedals than others? I was readily able use a normal 9/16 wrench to remove pedals yesterday.
    Depends on the clearance between pedal and crank.15mm is the norm on bettter bikes,and 9/16 is toys r us stuff. Some pedals even have a hex key option on the baskside.

  5. #5
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,428
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Ranger
    I am ready to start making some of my own minor repairs. I don't want to invest all at once in a bunch of tools. I basically want to be able to do some of the more novice types of repairs. I presently have standard work tools in my garage along with a couple bike multi-tools. One also has a chain tool but i think it might not be very good. I have had a hard time replacing pins with it so far anyway.

    I can adjust my deraillers and am now ready to tackle other tasks. Last week i repacked my rear hub. Yeah!!! I know that i need a lockring removal tool to remove the cassette. I have an old chain that i plan to use for a chainwhip. I also have a bench vice. I also plan to get some brake and derailler cables and cable cutters.

    What else do i need to get for novice repairs? I am not ready to tackle things like bottom bracket and headset yet. Although once more comfortable, i will. Also i was wondering if there are any small parts to keep on hand. In my line of work, i carry a tackle box with lots of odds and ends to repair things.
    What odds and ends do i need for the bike? Where can i get ball bearings online? etc. Any tips would be appreciated.
    If you don't have one,buy the appropriate Zinn maintenance book. It covers tools.Then take a look at your bike and figure out what you need. Newer stuff with threadless HS and cartridge BB and cartridge bearing hubs are different from old school stuff and require different tools.Crank puller,BB tool,Casette lockring tool, chain whip, chain tool and cone wrenchs are the common bike specific tools.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Montreal
    My Bikes
    Peugeot Hybrid, Minelli Hybrid
    Posts
    6,521
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you are heavy I would also recommend a spoke tensiometer, as this would be a great wheelsaver.

  7. #7
    Stays crunchy in milk
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Richmond Hill, ON
    Posts
    129
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by halfbiked
    Are pedal spanners more necessary for some pedals than others? I was readily able use a normal 9/16 wrench to remove pedals yesterday.
    I tried using a 15mm wrench out of my toolbox to change pedals, and I ended up scratching a nice semi-circle in the finish of the crank arm on my new Devinci hybrid I guess it was because the wrench didn't have much clearance, and I could not get quite enough leverage. Throw a little inexperience in there too.

    I purchased the Park PW-3 pedal wrench and it works a treat.
    Last edited by AJRoberts; 08-26-04 at 11:04 AM.

  8. #8
    okay maybe not. mmerner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    waukesha, wi
    My Bikes
    oh a bunch.
    Posts
    598
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've found the Park Tool website to be useful. They have tool lists for differnet skill levels. They have pictures and descriptions for us true newbies. Also have pictures of the tools in action. Sure they lead you to buy their tools, but it's a good knowledge base.

    http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/toollists.shtml

  9. #9
    Al noisebeam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    AZ
    My Bikes
    Cannondale SuperSix, Lemond Poprad. Retired: Jamis Sputnik, Centurion LeMans Fixed, Diamond Back ascent ex
    Posts
    13,974
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just a couple of vice grips

    (That is how I did most of my repairs on my bike when I was in Jr High school. It got me by.)

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    144
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Like mmerner said, go to Parks website for tool recommendations and maint/repair procedures for what you really need. Also look for forum posts on alternatives and tips: A Dremel w/ rigid cutoff wheel works well for cutting cable housing, you can solder the ends of cables to keep them from fraying, star nut can be seated with a large dowel or socket, etc.

    Park's website is excellent. Zinn's book is good, but if you can, borrow it from the library first. I wish it were more detailed and up to date. Of course this forum, mtbr.com etc. are great resources.

    Dave

  11. #11
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    5,434
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Since you have the basics covered, I would not go out to buy a bunch more tools all at once. Since you are basically going to have to buy them individually anyway, just wait until you need to do a job that requires some special tool and buy it then. It spreads the cost out and you don't end up with tools you don't use.

  12. #12
    Senior Member geoduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    !NorCal!
    Posts
    146
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Does anybody know what size Allen wrench I need to remove the cap on my cranks (TruVativ 5D)?

    TIA

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •