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Old 04-18-10, 07:44 PM   #1
Tunnelrat81
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Conversion chart for Wheelsmith tension gauge

Is anyone here able and willing to share a print of the wheelsmith spoke tension meter chart? I borrowed a wheelsmith gauge from a friend to finish up a new wheelset and he didn't have the chart in the box. =( I tried the wheelsmith website and google, emailed wheelsmith, but I'm not sure how long it may take them to get back to me. Any help would be appreciated.

-Jeremy
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Old 04-18-10, 08:04 PM   #2
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I should be able to post it in an hour or so...

=8-)
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4000+ wheels built since 1984...

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1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
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Old 04-18-10, 08:16 PM   #3
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I should be able to post it in an hour or so...

=8-)
That would be awesome. Thanks. =)

-Jeremy
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Old 04-18-10, 09:23 PM   #4
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That would be awesome. Thanks. =)

-Jeremy
Kinda poor quality...zoom or view as 75% or 100% and you'll be able to read it pretty well.


http://www.mrrabbit.net/images/wheel...ding_chart.jpg


=8-)
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4000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
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Old 04-18-10, 09:43 PM   #5
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Kinda poor quality...zoom or view as 75% or 100% and you'll be able to read it pretty well.


http://www.mrrabbit.net/images/wheel...ding_chart.jpg


=8-)
Thanks so much.... I realize that this may not be accurate with DT swiss spokes... I'm using 14/15/14 "comp" spokes. If i'm going to assume that it's close enough for safety, is it safe to assume that I'll be working out of the "SS" spoke type column for 15 gauge spokes? Also, I'm curious about what the other spoke types represent (DB, ACE, AE). Thanks again for your help. Hopefully I won't have to get a hold of a DT swiss compatible gauge for this =(. The design of this one is impressively simple.

*edit* Just realized that "DB" must stand for double butted...So I want to use the highest gauge section....so DB 15 for this? That is the (thin) area on the spoke that I'm taking my readings from. Thanks.

-Jeremy
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Old 04-18-10, 09:57 PM   #6
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If you are measuring 14/15/14, then use DB14. If 15/16/15, then use DB15.

You'll be clamping the thin section is each case.

Typically when using SS14, I get tension to the point such such that two lines fall between 80 and 75. However, I'll have one line a tad closer to 80 while the other is a tad further from 75. This is what I consider to be @110 kgf which is my goal on rear drive side.

Point being is...you're allowed to estimate.

I find the Wheelsmith tool quicker to work with - while the Park version has a more comprehensive, broken out and detailed chart with a little more resolution.

The Wheelsmith tool is 10X sturdier too - I practically get a heart attack any time the Park tool ponders the edge of a table.

=8-)
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4000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
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Old 04-18-10, 10:19 PM   #7
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Sounds perfect. I'll keep picking you brain while I can then. =) I'm wanting to set the DS rear and the front at around the same "preferred" tension right, or maybe a bit lower on the front...and the NDS rear at whatever I can to maintain proper dish? How do you go about choosing these absolute tension numbers then? Should I base it on spoke count, Rim type or something else...or is the standard of 110 kgf good for any type wheel?

I'm building a 2x 24h Kinlin XR-270 front wheel, and a 2x 28h Kinlin XR-300 rear.

-Jeremy
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Old 04-18-10, 10:28 PM   #8
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Get the front to 100-102 kgf...55 on the chart for DB14.

Get the rear drive on average closer to 110 kgf...a slight bias for 60 on the chart for DB14. A few spokes will actually hit 60...don't panic...focus on average.

Good Luck!


=8-)
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4000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
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Old 04-18-10, 10:31 PM   #9
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Sounds good. As far as variances....how close is reasonable? I'm new at this and still figuring out how to get them nicely balanced.

-Jeremy
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Old 04-18-10, 11:00 PM   #10
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On the rear drive AFTER final true and STRESS relief, if a few are 55, a few are 60, and most are close to 60, then you are alright. It is very very rare to have each and every spoke read the same AND have +/- .002 in. trueness. I get that only once in a rare while - and I've been doing this since 1984.

Joints are where you will most likely experience overly tight or overly loose spokes - it's pretty common for it to happen near joints.

=8-)
__________________
4000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
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