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  1. #1
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    Wireless Computer Installation

    There are times when items you purchase are not what they seem and I want to check this out before going forward with a wireless computer purchase. It may say "wireless," but that does not mean it will be a simple installation. I have been looking at the wireless computers and wanted to know how easy or complicated these items are to install. The one I am looking at is the CatEye CD300 Double Wireless as well as the Shimano Flight Deck. Also, even though it is "wireless," what are the components that need to be installed. Any info on this subject would be greatly appreciated.

    Also, is there a preference to CatEye or Shimano as far as bike computer? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    I don't know what quick reply is for yet. But I assume it may be for thanking people for responding to my question(s). Thank you!

  3. #3
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    I had the same concern. LBS said it was no big deal. It wasn't. I bought 2 Vetta's and installed both of them in about 15-20 minutes. Just read the instructions and take your time. Easy stuff. Mine do not have the cadence feature, I initially wanted it but the lbs convinced me otherwise. Good luck.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Actually, how hard it is to get working seems to depend on a lot of things including the size of the frame. The distance between the pick up and the computer head are critical and sometimes if the brake caliper for example is in the way, it will disrupt the signal. You have to install a magnet on one of your spokes, a pick up usually on the front fork, and a mount on your handlebar. The computer head clips in and out of the handlebar mount.

    When I install a wireless computer, I mount the wheel magnet and pick up first. Then I clip the head into the handlebar mount, hold it close to the pick up on the fork, and spin the wheel. If I get a MPH reading, I know that it's working. Then I hold the head unit close to where I plan to install it on the handlebar and see if it still works. If it doesn't, I try to figure out where I have to mount the head or how to move the pick up to get a clear signal. If you have average or better mechanical ability, it's a piece of cake.

    Wireless Flight Decks really aren't wireless. You have to connect a wire to each of the shifters. If you are getting a wireless computer to make the installation easier then a Flight Deck might not be for you. Connecting the shifter wires and programming the head are the two most involved parts of the installation so getting the wireless Flight Deck won't save you much installation grief.

  5. #5
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    Not any harder then installing a wired computer. With a wired computer you still have to put the magnet on the spoke and a sending unit on the fork then run the wire and computer up to the handlebar (I don't like using zip ties or tape so I just twisted the wire around the front brake cable-allowing enough slack so the wheel will turn or you'll pull the wire out of the computer!). With a wireless, you put the magnet on the wheel, place the sending unit on the fork, then just mount the computer and your good to go. The only technical part (if you call this technical), with the wireless is to make sure the sending unit has it's internal antenna pointing up towards the computer, and that the sending unit is not too far from the computer so as not to recieve a signal, which in every case I've seen that was never an issue. So I actually think the wireless is easier to set up because I don't have to fool with a wire.

  6. #6
    hors category TandemGeek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steveinptown
    The one I am looking at is the CatEye CD300 Double Wireless as well as the Shimano Flight Deck.
    You've set the bar pretty high in terms of "difficulty factor". The Cateye dual wireless models are slick and truly wireless, but they are also quite new and a bit buggy often times requiring factory replacement shortly after purchase: something to keep in mind. The Shimano Flight Deck (and the Campy ErgoBrain) are the most complex of the various computers IF you intend to use the full-functionality. Neither the Flight Deck nor the ErgoBrain are not truly wireless as there are signal wires that must run to each shifter for the remote switches and gear position indicators sensors.


    Quote Originally Posted by steveinptown
    Also, even though it is "wireless," what are the components that need to be installed. Any info on this subject would be greatly appreciated.

    Cateye = 1) computer head mounts on the handlebars, 2) dual transmitter gets mounted just behind your bottom bracket on the left chainstay, 3) magnet for wheel rotation goes on a spoke, and 4) magnet for crank rpm gets attached to the backside of your left crank.


    Shimano = Installation prep: remove handlebar tape from your stem to your shifters and peel roll up the shifter boots (can sometimes be done carefully enough to allow for re-use of the bar tape. Next, remove two screws on each lever to access the signal wire connections for the gear position sensor and remote thumb switches. Computer Installation: 1) computer head clamp mounts on the right side of your handlebars; 2) signal wires for front derailleur & left thumb switches get routed and connected to the left-hand STI lever and the signal wires for the rear derailleur & right thumb switches get routed and connected to the right-hand STI lever; 3) after connecting the wires to the left and right STI levers, reinstall the cover plate and two screws on the each STI lever; 4) mount the wheel rotation sensor/ transmitter your fork blade; 5) mount the magnet for the wheel rotation on a spoke; 6) figure out if everything works; 7) tape the signal wires to your handlebars; 8) re-wrap the upper section of your handlebars with the handlebar tape that was peeled back during installation prep; 9) roll-down the shifter boots.


    Quote Originally Posted by steveinptown
    Also, is there a preference to CatEye or Shimano as far as bike computer? Thanks.

    The Cateyes are too new to know how they will perform long-term whereas the Shimano Flight Decks have a pretty good following of either very happy users or folks who just don't like 'em. Cyclists who sweat a lot and who ride on the STI shifter hoods should flush-out the levers after sweaty rides to help prevent future problems with signal wire connection corrosion. If you end up with corroded electricals you will lose the gear position functions and the virtual cadence.

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