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  1. #1
    Senior Member TamaraEden's Avatar
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    Front brakes rub

    How do I get my silly front brake pads from rubbing as I ride. I can jiggle the entire brake mechanism to make it stop but why does it do this? is there a simple adjustment or is it normal. That shh shh shh when I ride makes me a little wonky.
    Be the change you wish to see in the world - Ghandi

  2. #2
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    Are you riding a road bike with side pull caliper brakes? Typically if a brake is moving from side to side check to see if the mounting nut on the back side of the fork or frame is tight. If the mounting nut is tight then your problem is on the front side of the brake.

    Post pics of your brake or check this side out to see if any of the info applies to your brake.

    http://parktool.com/repair/byregion.asp?catid=14

  3. #3
    Senior Member TamaraEden's Avatar
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    Hi Ingleside:

    Thanks for quick reply. I'm riding a TREK WSD 7000. I believe last year's model. It's the front brake and yes, I believe you'd call these pull caliper. I know, I'm a technical dummy. I took two quick iPhone pics which are likely unclear.

    Attachment 148952Attachment 148953

    Quote Originally Posted by Ingleside View Post
    Are you riding a road bike with side pull caliper brakes? Typically if a brake is moving from side to side check to see if the mounting nut on the back side of the fork or frame is tight. If the mounting nut is tight then your problem is on the front side of the brake.

    Post pics of your brake or check this side out to see if any of the info applies to your brake.

    http://parktool.com/repair/byregion.asp?catid=14
    Be the change you wish to see in the world - Ghandi

  4. #4
    Low car diet JiveTurkey's Avatar
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    The 7000 uses Shimano "V-brakes" or generic "direct pull brakes."

    Is just one side rubbing? If, so then you can adjust how close each arm sits from the rim. On the side that rubs, locate the little tension screw on the base of the arm near where it pivots. Turning this screw in will increase the spring tension and make the arm sit further away from the wheel. Give it a quarter- or half-turn at a time then squeeze the brake lever a couple times and check. Be aware that making one side go further from the rime will make the other side get closer. You want to adjust either or both screw until the rim is centered between the two pads.

    If both sides rub, then either it's set up too tight or the wheel is too out-of-true. Does one side rub, then the other, then it repeats when the wheel rotates? If so, it's out of true. You may need to true it. Or, if you feel like you can just make both pads further, then see below.

    If you just need to make both arms go further from the rim, then you need to make the cable longer. This is done by actually making the housing shorter. At the brake lever, you should be able to turn a bolt where the cable exits clock-wise. This screws the bolt in, effectively shortening the cable. There is likely a locknut on the bolt. This needs to be loosened before adjusting the bolt, then tightened after to keep the bolt from moving.

    Don't make the cable too long, or else the brake arm will bottom out against the handlebar before full braking power is realized. If you've opened up the arms as far as possible, but you're still getting rubbing on both sides. It's likely that the rim is too far out of true.

    Also, make sure the pads are actually rubbing on the rim and not the tire.
    Quote Originally Posted by slopvehicle View Post
    Not wearing a helmet makes me more aware of my surroundings. I find myself anticipating the hardness of concrete 50 or 100 feet in front of me, it's almost a zen-like connection between my face and the pavement.

  5. #5
    Senior Member TamaraEden's Avatar
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    WOW Jive Turkey! Thanks a gazillion. I'll defiinitely copy and email this to myself to play with it later on. I'm trying to get myself riding regularly. I did good for about 5 months last year then fell off the riding wagon. Goal is to get back on and ride lots more. My bike had DUST all over it when I took it out today. 3 miles and I was pooped. Pathetic! But, at least I might have a fix for that annoying rubbing

    Quote Originally Posted by JiveTurkey View Post
    The 7000 uses Shimano "V-brakes" or generic "direct pull brakes."

    Is just one side rubbing? If, so then you can adjust how close each arm sits from the rim. On the side that rubs, locate the little tension screw on the base of the arm near where it pivots. Turning this screw in will increase the spring tension and make the arm sit further away from the wheel. Give it a quarter- or half-turn at a time then squeeze the brake lever a couple times and check. Be aware that making one side go further from the rime will make the other side get closer. You want to adjust either or both screw until the rim is centered between the two pads.

    If both sides rub, then either it's set up too tight or the wheel is too out-of-true. Does one side rub, then the other, then it repeats when the wheel rotates? If so, it's out of true. You may need to true it. Or, if you feel like you can just make both pads further, then see below.

    If you just need to make both arms go further from the rim, then you need to make the cable longer. This is done by actually making the housing shorter. At the brake lever, you should be able to turn a bolt where the cable exits clock-wise. This screws the bolt in, effectively shortening the cable. There is likely a locknut on the bolt. This needs to be loosened before adjusting the bolt, then tightened after to keep the bolt from moving.

    Don't make the cable too long, or else the brake arm will bottom out against the handlebar before full braking power is realized. If you've opened up the arms as far as possible, but you're still getting rubbing on both sides. It's likely that the rim is too far out of true.

    Also, make sure the pads are actually rubbing on the rim and not the tire.
    Be the change you wish to see in the world - Ghandi

  6. #6
    Low car diet JiveTurkey's Avatar
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    You're welcome. I just noticed a typo. In the second-to-last paragraph, I meant "Don't make the cable too long, or else the brake lever will bottom out against the handlebar before full braking power is realized."
    Quote Originally Posted by slopvehicle View Post
    Not wearing a helmet makes me more aware of my surroundings. I find myself anticipating the hardness of concrete 50 or 100 feet in front of me, it's almost a zen-like connection between my face and the pavement.

  7. #7
    Senior Member TamaraEden's Avatar
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    Cool, I need to read read and reread it, then bring it to someone and ask. Truthfully, I live really close to Orange20 (if you don't knwo them look them up). Groovy hipster very professional bike shop. Might just bring to them, tell them what was suggested. It's prob a 10 min. job for a professional OR I also live close to the Bike Kitchen. Do it yourself co-op with folks there to help. BUT...your info at least will allow me to ask for help without looking like a total idiot. You know I'm THAT cyclist. The one with the funky step through, a couple stickers, bell, computer, lights...and never ride
    Be the change you wish to see in the world - Ghandi

  8. #8
    Low car diet JiveTurkey's Avatar
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    Go ahead and give it a shot yourself. Since you're just messing around with screws, the worst thing that could happen is the brakes rub, which they already do. Then take it the pros.
    Quote Originally Posted by slopvehicle View Post
    Not wearing a helmet makes me more aware of my surroundings. I find myself anticipating the hardness of concrete 50 or 100 feet in front of me, it's almost a zen-like connection between my face and the pavement.

  9. #9
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    I just wanted to say thank you. I came across this thread after searching for the same problem of front caliper brakes rubbing, and sure enough I was able to fix the problem by adjusting the spring tension screw. My bike and myself thank you all!

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