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Thread: My first build

  1. #1
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    My first build

    Hello all,
    I purchased a 2008 Orbea Onix frame. It has a seat, seat post, fork, and brake calipers.
    I think I will need handlebars, stem, shifters, front and rear derailleurís, chain, cables, crankset with bearing/bracket, pedals, front and rear wheels, and cassette.
    I will probably go with Ultegra parts but am unsure on a few of the choices.
    1. Crankset Crank arm length and bracket size
    2. The 2 choices on the rear derailleur, total capacity of teeth
    3. The choices on the front derailleur, total teeth and clamp on vs braze on
    The rest like wheels (700c), handlebars, stem, and shifters should be pretty straight forward.
    Any help with how to determine what I need for the above 3 would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Kurt

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    1. Crank arm length is a personal choice. You can really never go too short, only too long. If you search, you'll find out how to calculate a "recommended" crank arm length based on your inseam. Depending on your height, it may or may not be an off-the-shelf option. I would recommend not sweating it and simply buying the same length crank that you've used previously, unless there was something about it that you didn't like.

    Bottom bracket size is set by the frame and the bottom bracket needs to match your crankset. Most frames these days use an English threaded bottom bracket though a few still use Italian. I doubt your Spanish frame uses an Italtion thread but you should confirm this will Orbea first to be sure. Or someone here might know the answer.

    2. Assuming you are pairing a standard road crankset with a standard road cassette, you'll want the short cage (SS) derailler if you are using a double crankset, or the medium cage (GS) rear derailler if using a triple crankset.

    3. The front derailler is similar to the rear in terms of capacity. They are typically spec'd as double or triple. Match the derailler to your crank style. Braze-on or clamp-on will depend on your frame. Look on the seat tube for a metal mounting bracket with a vertical slot. If there is nothing of the sort and the tube is round, you need a clamp-on front derailler. Again, Orbea should be able to tell you what size clamp you need or you could use a caliper to accurately measure the diameter (be sure to measure where the front derailler will actually clamp as some tubes vary is size along their length).

    Honestly, based on your questions, I would recommend that you post a list of everything you plan to buy prior to ordering anything. I'm a little concerned that you understand the level of component matching that needs to occur to have a properly working/assembled bike. If nothing else, it will be a little piece of mind for yourself and maybe save you some shipping and restocking fees.

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    1. Great info on the crank arm, I will use the same as on my other bike (175 I think).

    Bottom bracket size I hope to find somewhere or will look for a way to measure it. I will also send an email to Orbea.

    2. I will be using a double road crank (50-34) and a 10 speed 12-25 cassette. That puts the SS rear derailleur at the end of its spec. Would it be better to go with the GS?

    3. The front derailler I want is for a double. The FD-6700 vs FD-6703 looks like one has larger teeth capacity and braze on capability but they both can clamp on with the same tube sizes. I don't see a bottom vs top pull and I should fit within the top gear capacity.


    Honestly, based on your questions, I would recommend that you post a list of everything you plan to buy prior to ordering anything. I'm a little concerned that you understand the level of component matching that needs to occur to have a properly working/assembled bike. If nothing else, it will be a little piece of mind for yourself and maybe save you some shipping and restocking fees.[/QUOTE]

    I agree. When I replaced my MTB rear XTR derailleur I didn't get the "normal high or normal low" and ordered the wrong unit and had to send it back.

    Here is what I am looking at:

    Ultegra ST-6700 or 6703 shifters (not sure, looks like either would work/Double vs triple on the front is the difference?)

    Ultegra CS 6700 10 gear 12-25 rear cassette.

    Ultegra CN-6700 Chain

    Ultegra FC-6750 50-34 Crankset (unknown crankset bracket)

    Ultegra RD-6700-GS or SS rear derailleur. Which one?

    Ultegra FD-6700 or 6703 front derailleur. Which one?

    Looking at the Shimano choices, the 105 series might be just as good for me. I live in the DC area and ride about 25 miles a day, more on weekends. No racing. Slightly rolling hills. I picked the Ultegra and gears by looking at specs from other bikes. I welcome any suggestions (series/gears/anything). Thanks for all your help.

    Kurt

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    Save yourself some money and go 105. My new cross bike has full 105 and it rocks. Can't wait to see your pics!

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    Quote Originally Posted by kurt404 View Post
    Bottom bracket size I hope to find somewhere or will look for a way to measure it. I will also send an email to Orbea.
    I should have added a few more notes about distinguishing English from Italian threading. One way you can check is the measure the bottom bracket shell width. It should be 68mm for English and 70mm for Italian. An Italian bottom bracket will also use normal, right hand threads on both sides whereas English will have the drive side left hand threaded (you'll want to remember this when you install the new bottom bracket).

    Quote Originally Posted by kurt404 View Post
    2. I will be using a double road crank (50-34) and a 10 speed 12-25 cassette. That puts the SS rear derailleur at the end of its spec. Would it be better to go with the GS?
    There's nothing wrong with running the RD to the end of it's spec. Plenty of stock bikes come equipped with a 50/34 crank and a 12/27 cassette and the combo works fine. With that said, you can't go wrong just using the GS. The extra wrap capacity won't hurt anything and might come in handy some day. Ignore anyone who tells you that your shifting will be compromised by going with the GS versus the SS. You'll never notice a difference if one even exists.

    Quote Originally Posted by kurt404 View Post
    3. The front derailler I want is for a double. The FD-6700 vs FD-6703 looks like one has larger teeth capacity and braze on capability but they both can clamp on with the same tube sizes. I don't see a bottom vs top pull and I should fit within the top gear capacity.
    If you are using a double crank, you'll be better off using the 6700 front derailler. All road front deraillers are bottom pull. Your frame is most certainly set up for a bottom pull front derailler as well. One thing I didn't mention in the clamp-on/braze-on discussion is that braze-on front deraillers are far more versatile than clamp-on. Even if your frame is designed for a clamp-on front derailler, I'd recommend buying a braze-on then using a clamp-on adapter for the braze-on derailler. If you ever switch frames or sell the components, you won't have to worry about matching clamp inner diameters or if the new frame uses a braze-on mount. you either discard the clamp-on adapter or buy a new adapter to fit the new frame (much cheaper than a new clamp-on front derailler).

    Quote Originally Posted by kurt404 View Post
    Ultegra ST-6700 or 6703 shifters (not sure, looks like either would work/Double vs triple on the front is the difference?)
    Either will work but the ST-6700 will save you some set up headaches. However, the ST-6703 will let you, or someone else, use a triple some day. Shimano has had issues using a single set of shifters for both double and triple in the past due to people over-shifting and damaging the shifter. If that problem didn't occur, I would not hesitate to recommend the triple shifters. I'll leave that decision up to you.

    Quote Originally Posted by kurt404 View Post
    Looking at the Shimano choices, the 105 series might be just as good for me. I live in the DC area and ride about 25 miles a day, more on weekends. No racing. Slightly rolling hills. I picked the Ultegra and gears by looking at specs from other bikes. I welcome any suggestions (series/gears/anything). Thanks for all your help.

    Kurt
    If it fits into your budget, Ultegra 6700 is a great choice. I've heard a lot of praise for that group though I have yet to use it myself. It has nicer aesthetics with hidden shifter housing versus the older Shimano shifters that had the housing exiting straight out the side of the shifter. I've used various Shimano groups and really can't complain about any of them though. You get lighter weight and a nicer finish on the high dollar stuff but it can be tough to justify the huge price increase based on that alone. If your budget is tight, don't feel bad about using 105 or even Tiagra or Sora. They will all function great. 105 or higher gets you 10 speeds though which I personally prefer or 9.

    As for gearing, what are you using now and how do you like it? I am not a big fan of compact doubles due to the big gap between chainrings and the fact that the transition between rings occurs at a speed many cyclists often ride at (meaning you'll be switching between front chainrings a lot along with several rear shifts to get the next lower/higher gear). My personal preference is for a triple as I ride a lot of steep hills and like having bailout gears. They can come in handy on easier slops too when you've had a long day in the saddle. The transition points between chainrings suit me perfectly as well allowing me to stay in the middle ring (42) for most of my riding, switching to the 52 or 30 as needed for steep downhill or uphill sections. If the terrain you ride is relatively flat or if you are strong enough to get away with a standard double, I think you'll be happier with that gearing versus a compact.

    If you get the chance, try all of the options out first. You may find that my advice completely misses the mark for how you ride and that a compact is perfect for you. Keep in mind that the weight penalty for a triple is quite small and that the extra gears will allow you to climb for a lot longer than a half pound lighter bike would.

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    Looks like 105's could be the best way to go.

    ST-R700 shifters
    CS-5600 11-25 cassette
    CN-5600 chain
    FC-5603 50-39-30 crankset
    FD-5603-B front derailleur
    RD-5600-GS rear derailleur

    My current bike has 26-36-48 in the front and 11-34 in the rear. I never use the 26 so I decided no on the triples but the road triples gives me a nice range without going to low. With this setup it looks like I must use the GS rear derailleur but one last question on the cranks. Compact or not? The only difference I see is in the bolt pattern diameter.
    Does the above look good?
    Thanks,

    Kurt

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