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Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

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Old 05-03-10, 11:52 PM   #1
krazygl00
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Carnage

A friend of mine asked me to rebuild his wheel, but he had unlaced and removed the spokes before removing the lockring and cog.

Because it was proving difficult to get a chain whip and lockring wrench on the same side, I put one of my cogs on the "flop" side and secured it with a chain whip, then used the lockring wrench on the other side. Hilarity ensued.

IMG_7292..JPG

Hubs aren't made to take that kind of torsion...

IMG_7295..jpg

...especially when you are using the lever of the Gods, in this case the tube from a Park repair stand. That's like 3 feet of leverage. The vise-grips are holding the wrench on the lockring, which is definitely handy. I swore to myself one way or another that lockring is coming off. It's still there.

I really thought the chain whip would have broken first.

IMG_7293..JPG

IMG_7294..jpg

The worst part? Now MY cog is stuck on the other side, thanks to like 300 ft-lbs of torque. Next step? I'm nailing the remains of the hub through the holes in the flange to a large board and removing my lockring.

In other news, a Hazon lockring tool is pretty strong. And use vice-grips to secure the lockring tool to the cog...definitely helped.
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Old 05-04-10, 12:17 AM   #2
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You should really just lace the hub back up to a rim. And charge your friend triple for the trouble.
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Old 05-04-10, 10:36 AM   #3
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Is it just me, or do I see a lugged steel, curved-tube, pursuit road frame with its derailer hanger cut off of it?

This hub is not the only carnage around here.

-Kurt
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Old 05-04-10, 12:42 PM   #4
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Is it just me, or do I see a lugged steel, curved-tube, pursuit road frame with its derailer hanger cut off of it?

This hub is not the only carnage around here.

-Kurt
You are correct sir, although only the bottom bracket is lugged. The frame is as I bought it, poorly rattle-canned, with hanger chopped off, and in these photos it is only serving as the work platform. The bike was unharmed in the making of this project; only the hub was a casualty.

It's an 80's Fuji TT/Pursuit and you can see some of the original paint peaking through. This bike has been slated to be stripped and refinished and receive some other TLC, but it is far back in the queue. An example of how the original frame would have looked (different bike):

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Old 05-04-10, 12:54 PM   #5
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Stupid question:
Are you aware that lockrings have a reverse thread?
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Old 05-04-10, 12:57 PM   #6
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Stupid question:
Are you aware that lockrings have a reverse thread?
Yes I am
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Old 05-04-10, 01:40 PM   #7
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If you still haven't gotten your cog back, saw two flats opposite each other into the near flange (the only one left now) clamp the flange in a vise and spin your cog off.

You're neither the first not the last to learn that the barrel of a hub shell has little torsional strength. It's a shame it broke, one of my favorite old oddities was an old Campy record shell with the "Campagnolo" stamped in a perfect helix. Created when someone built a wheel with the flanges out of phase, and succeeded in solving the problem with spoke tension alone.
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Old 05-04-10, 04:32 PM   #8
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You're neither the first not the last to learn that the barrel of a hub shell has little torsional strength. It's a shame it broke, one of my favorite old oddities was an old Campy record shell with the "Campagnolo" stamped in a perfect helix. Created when someone built a wheel with the flanges out of phase, and succeeded in solving the problem with spoke tension alone.
It's making me dizzy thinking of how that would even be possible.
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Old 05-04-10, 05:36 PM   #9
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[QUOTE=krazygl00;10763948 The frame is as I bought it, poorly rattle-canned, with hanger chopped off, and in these photos it is only serving as the work platform.[/QUOTE]

What a shame. Beautiful machine, nevertheless (and if you ever want to go back to geared, a framebuilder can silver solder a new hanger on it). Best of luck on the hub.

-Kurt
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Old 05-04-10, 05:50 PM   #10
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So I took another look at the photo, and as a New Yorker I have to comment that the vise-grip lends a certain class to the photo of a beatup, fixed wheel, converted steel road bike. Couldn't be a more appropriate vignette of the NYC cycling scene in the seventies.
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Old 05-04-10, 08:44 PM   #11
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what a shame.

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Old 05-05-10, 09:05 AM   #12
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So I took another look at the photo, and as a New Yorker I have to comment that the vise-grip lends a certain class to the photo of a beatup, fixed wheel, converted steel road bike. Couldn't be a more appropriate vignette of the NTC cycling scene in the seventies.
I looked all over for NTC then figured out you typo'd NYC.

Hey, at least the vise grips weren't holding the axle on (I've seen this) But I do resent the implication that this bike is an abused child.
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Old 05-05-10, 09:20 AM   #13
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I fixed the typo, anyway the standard place to carry vice-grips back in the day was clamped around the seat post and sticking straight back under the saddle. No tool bag required.

I certainly didn't mean to imply it was abused, all my bikes have lots of miles on them and all of them look it. Bikes are vehicles, not collectibles in my book, so the various scars earned over the years aren't blemishes, they signs of experience and character. Part of the charm of still usable old stuff.
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Old 05-05-10, 11:18 AM   #14
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I fixed the typo, anyway the standard place to carry vice-grips back in the day was clamped around the seat post and sticking straight back under the saddle. No tool bag required.

I certainly didn't mean to imply it was abused, all my bikes have lots of miles on them and all of them look it. Bikes are vehicles, not collectibles in my book, so the various scars earned over the years aren't blemishes, they signs of experience and character. Part of the charm of still usable old stuff.
Agree 100%.

As long as you don't report me to DFABS
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