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Old 09-02-04, 07:35 AM   #1
Bart5657
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Lube for Kabuki

Hey guys. My dad got his Bridgestone Kabuki Submariner in about 1968, 1969. Over the past 5 years I have been using it, and somewhat heavily lately. Over the years the bike has gotten fairly dirty (but not rusty, its stainless steel ), and things just arent as smooth as they used to be. My goal now is too change all the cables, brake pads, and the chain. Take apart the headset and crankset (and also the fork, beacuse I noticed that where the fork goes into the frame it has gotten very dirty) , and clean and grease them. And also clean all the gears, and adjust and fine tune the deraileurs.
My question to you guys is this. I have some light chain oil, will this suffice as as a lube for all the parts? Also what can I use to clean the gears and deraileurs, can i just spay them with WD 40?? One more thing, I have never taken a chain off a bike, whats the proper way to do it, and what tools are required?
Thx a lot, and I apologize if this posting is not the most grammatically piece of literature on the forums.
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Old 09-02-04, 07:41 AM   #2
sydney
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Originally Posted by Bart5657
Hey guys. My dad got his Bridgestone Kabuki Submariner in about 1968, 1969. Over the past 5 years I have been using it, and somewhat heavily lately. Over the years the bike has gotten fairly dirty (but not rusty, its stainless steel ), and things just arent as smooth as they used to be. My goal now is too change all the cables, brake pads, and the chain. Take apart the headset and crankset (and also the fork, beacuse I noticed that where the fork goes into the frame it has gotten very dirty) , and clean and grease them. And also clean all the gears, and adjust and fine tune the deraileurs.
My question to you guys is this. I have some light chain oil, will this suffice as as a lube for all the parts? Also what can I use to clean the gears and deraileurs, can i just spay them with WD 40?? One more thing, I have never taken a chain off a bike, whats the proper way to do it, and what tools are required?
Thx a lot, and I apologize if this posting is not the most grammatically piece of literature on the forums.
wd-40 or paint thinner will remove crud. You need a proper grease for bearings. Anything from white lithium to synthetic waterproof marine grease will work. Cheap at wallymart. You need a chain tool for reemoving and replacing the chain. Check the www.parktool repair section .
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Old 09-02-04, 09:04 AM   #3
sch
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When you dissassemble the headset, wheels and BB do so with the bike or part
near horizontal over a large old towel, so the bearings don't go bouncing all over
the place. You will have to examine the bearing races closely for pits and brinelling,
most likely place for brinelling will be the head set. If you plan to replace the bearings, which is cheap and advisable, you will need to know approximately how
many, and the size. Since it is easy to lose bearings reinstall them til there are no
more gaps large enough for a bearing. Don't overlook the pedals. If you reuse the
bearings clean them thoroughly and check a sample of them for pits. If the bike
has lots of miles a new chain may clash with the freewheel and skip and jerk especially under torque-say 6k to 10k miles wear on the chain. This is mostly on the smaller
two cogs on the freewheel. New wide range freewheels are readily available, narrow
range not so easy to find. Chain tools are somewhat chain sensitive, don't use
a tool meant for a 9spd chain on a 5-6-7 speed chain. You can bend side plates and break pins that way. Get a SRAM chain with a quick release connector for ease
of future changes. Steve
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Old 09-02-04, 09:41 AM   #4
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Chain tools are somewhat chain sensitive, don't use
a tool meant for a 9spd chain on a 5-6-7 speed chain. You can bend side plates and break pins that way.
Yeah???. .... I've got a park mini brute that has worked for years on everything from 5 thru 10 speeds.
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Old 09-02-04, 10:22 AM   #5
sch
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Park does rate that tool for any size chain, but not all tools are so universal and I
didn't want Bart to get a tool without checking that it was suitable for his target
chain use. For example I wouldn't want to use my POJ 40yr old Cyclo on a 10spd chain.
Might break it ok, but a bit wobbly for reassembly and loosening tight links. Steve
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