Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Your Recovery Ride Buddy krazygl00's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    24 879.6396 miles behind you
    My Bikes
    2000 Serotta Classique, 1999 Serotta C3S Atlanta, 2004 Kona Jake the Snake, 2009 Kona Paddywagon, 2006 Kona Kula, 1980's Fuji Pursuit TT Fix/SS conversion, 1980's Torpado Super Strada, Bridgestone RB1 Synergy
    Posts
    436
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    ROAD Gearing for Bogota Colombia

    My wife is from Bogota, Colombia, so we travel there regularly to see her family. After a few trips already since we were married 2 years ago, I'm getting tired of not having a bike there (it is actually a rather bike-friendly city).

    She and her family know nothing about bikes, other than sometimes someone changes the gears on the bike that the family shares and then everything goes nuts as they try to get it back into the gear they like. Really. So they're not going to be much help sourcing a bike locally, so I've begun gathering parts together for a bike to send and keep down there.

    This will be for a road bike (Salsa Campeon frameset), and when picking out gearing I'm toying with the nutty idea of putting a long cage derailleur and a 9sp mountain cassette (11-32 or similar) to go with the compact crankset (34-50) for ultra-low gearing. The region is very mountainous and since we won't live there year-round, every trip down I will have to acclimatize to the high elevation. So bottom line it is steep and I'll be short of wind at the slightest climb. Hence the desire for super-low gearing (34x32).

    Is this desirable? Will this work? Anyone have experience doing something like this?
    Quote Originally Posted by patentcad View Post
    Why are you all too fat for this sport?

  2. #2
    Real Men Ride Ordinaries fuzz2050's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    3,648
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A compact with a mountain cassette will work, but at that point, you may be better served with a triple. It will have a wider range and less of a gap between gears. Of course, if you prefer, you can run it with a compact and the large cassette, I did for a while on my touring bike. It's plenty low for most things, but getting it all to work together can be a bit finicky.

  3. #3
    Senior Member canopus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Kingwood, TX
    My Bikes
    1985 Cannondale SR300, 1985 Cannondale ST400, Gary Littlejohn Cruiser, BMX
    Posts
    1,207
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you aren't used to climbing I would look at a triple with lower gear than a standard 30t triple. A 34/32 compact double as a lowest gear of 28" @ 700x25c, but a triple running like a 24-36-48 or something like that allows you to get down to a 19" gear. I know you aren't touring but it isn't like your going to have one big climb and then your through for the ride. You going to climb every time you ride, multiple times so I would look at getting something to make that easier, especially if you don't do a lot of climbing now. At least it is something to think about....
    1984 Cannondale ST
    1985 Cannondale SR300
    1980 Gary Littlejohn Cruiser
    1984 Trek 760
    1981 Trek 710
    Pics

  4. #4
    Mechanic/Tourist
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    My Bikes
    2008 Novara Randonee - love it. Would have more bikes if I had time to ride them all. Previous bikes: 1968 Motobecane Mirage, 1972 Moto Grand Jubilee (my fav), Jackson Rake 16, 1983 C'dale ST500.
    Posts
    5,361
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Considering your weight loss ticker I would agree with the triple, especially if you're no longer a spring chicken.

  5. #5
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    The NC Mountains
    My Bikes
    Too many to list, all vintage
    Posts
    18,867
    Mentioned
    71 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    +1 I would go with a triple. Play around with the gear calculator on the Sheldon Brown site and you can see the impact of various drivetrain combinations.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    26
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    An 11-32 or 11-34 9sp cassette is a fine match for this situation (and yes, it will work fine on a road bike, with a MTB derailleur). You don't need the tighter gear ratios riding solo, and it gives you lower gearing than a 12-27 with a standard triple.

    If the hills are really steep and/or long, you can do this:
    11-32 or 11-34 on back, long-cage derailleur, 48/36/26 in front. The 48x11 top end is still decent, and you can practically climb a cliff without getting out of the saddle.

  7. #7
    Your Recovery Ride Buddy krazygl00's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    24 879.6396 miles behind you
    My Bikes
    2000 Serotta Classique, 1999 Serotta C3S Atlanta, 2004 Kona Jake the Snake, 2009 Kona Paddywagon, 2006 Kona Kula, 1980's Fuji Pursuit TT Fix/SS conversion, 1980's Torpado Super Strada, Bridgestone RB1 Synergy
    Posts
    436
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Wicker View Post
    An 11-32 or 11-34 9sp cassette is a fine match for this situation (and yes, it will work fine on a road bike, with a MTB derailleur). You don't need the tighter gear ratios riding solo, and it gives you lower gearing than a 12-27 with a standard triple.

    If the hills are really steep and/or long, you can do this:
    11-32 or 11-34 on back, long-cage derailleur, 48/36/26 in front. The 48x11 top end is still decent, and you can practically climb a cliff without getting out of the saddle.
    I already have the front crank installed, which is why I'd rather not get a triple and re-engineer all that. I just wanted to see about a change of cassette, and it sounds do-able. And yeah, this is for solo riding, and I suspect a lot of up or down, but seldom nice long stretches of flats, so settling into that perfect cadence won't be an issue. If I find out on the next trip that 34x32 isn't granny enough, I may try that triple. And yes, 26x32 will let you climb cliffs :-)

    The question now is, use a long-cage road or mountain derailleur? I came up with a formula for figuring out how much chain the derailleur needs to take up between big-big and small-small:

    (A/2-B/2)+(C/2-D/2)=Z

    where

    A=Largest Rear Cog (teeth)
    B=Smallest Rear Cog (teeth)
    C=Largest Front Ring (teeth)
    D=Smallest Front Ring (teeth)

    Z=Chain Take-Up (teeth)

    So in this case:
    ((32/2)-(11/2))+((50/2)-(34/2))=18.5T or ~9 inches of travel in the rear der. Now I just need to go look at various derailleurs. My guess is that as long as I stick with a double in front, a long cage road should do the trick with a mountain cassette.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Wilmington, DE
    My Bikes
    2003 Specialized Hardrock, 2004 LOOK KG386i, 2005 Iron Horse Warrior Expert, 2009 Pedal Force CX1
    Posts
    8,851
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    To be absolutely sure of compatibility, use the MTB long cage (or MTB medium cage if you don't think you'll ever go to a triple). You *might* be able to get a road long cage RD to clear a 32T cog, but you might not. Clearing a 34T cog is even less likely with a road RD. Chain wrap won't matter when your cassette is chewing up the jockey wheels on the RD

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Houston, TX - Energy corridor
    My Bikes
    2011 Trek SOHO Deluxe, and 2010 Specialized Roubaix Expert
    Posts
    867
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The 9000 ft elevation will be more challenging than the hills. I have noticed that they block off some streets on weekends for bicycles, running etc. Most of the streets aren't too hilly unless you go tot he northern part of the city.

    You may want durable wheels with a little wider tires. The streets are more rough than usually encountered in the US.

  10. #10
    Your Recovery Ride Buddy krazygl00's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    24 879.6396 miles behind you
    My Bikes
    2000 Serotta Classique, 1999 Serotta C3S Atlanta, 2004 Kona Jake the Snake, 2009 Kona Paddywagon, 2006 Kona Kula, 1980's Fuji Pursuit TT Fix/SS conversion, 1980's Torpado Super Strada, Bridgestone RB1 Synergy
    Posts
    436
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
    To be absolutely sure of compatibility, use the MTB long cage (or MTB medium cage if you don't think you'll ever go to a triple). You *might* be able to get a road long cage RD to clear a 32T cog, but you might not. Clearing a 34T cog is even less likely with a road RD. Chain wrap won't matter when your cassette is chewing up the jockey wheels on the RD
    Thanks for the tip on that...I'll probably try a mtb derailleur.

    Quote Originally Posted by gtragitt View Post
    The 9000 ft elevation will be more challenging than the hills. I have noticed that they block off some streets on weekends for bicycles, running etc. Most of the streets aren't too hilly unless you go tot he northern part of the city.

    You may want durable wheels with a little wider tires. The streets are more rough than usually encountered in the US.
    My wife tells me they close down the streets on Sundays for walking, running, biking, and the city turns into a bike paradise. She says tons of people ride. And yeah, the northern part is hillier, but that's toward where my in-laws live, and I'd likely head out that way, maybe towards Chia.
    Quote Originally Posted by patentcad View Post
    Why are you all too fat for this sport?

  11. #11
    Slow mechanic ryker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Calgary
    Posts
    238
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by krazygl00 View Post
    My wife tells me they close down the streets on Sundays for walking, running, biking, and the city turns into a bike paradise. She says tons of people ride.
    I got to experience this in Bogota. Called 'Ciclovia' - it was very cool.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELa5CHsUepo

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •