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  1. #1
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    Tip - cutting an aluminum seatpost

    I just installed a new KCNC Ti Pro Lite seatpost to replace my stock Roubaix seatpost. It was significantly longer than I needed.

    A copper tubing cutter that is used for plumbing makes a GREAT seatpost cutter. Very clean cut.

    FWIW.....
    2013 BMC TMR01 custom build, 2013 Cannondale F29er, 2012 Cannondale CAAD10 custom build
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  2. #2
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    The only problem with pipe cutters is they tend to leave a raised ridge on both sides of the cut line. You have to file or sand this off after cutting to make the post fit properly.

    I've cut over-long seatposts down using the same cutting guide and 32 tpi hacksaw I use for cutting fork steerer tubes. It also works well but I do file a bevel on the outside cut end of the post to make insertion in the sea tube easier.

  3. #3
    rebmeM roineS JanMM's Avatar
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    Tubing cutter works great for aluminum handlebars.
    How about for steel bars?
    RANS V3 (steel), RANS V-Rex, RANS Screamer

  4. #4
    Used to be Conspiratemus
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    I've cut over-long seatposts down using the same cutting guide and 32 tpi hacksaw I use for cutting fork steerer tubes. It also works well but I do file a bevel on the outside cut end of the post to make insertion in the sea tube easier.
    Good to file a bevel on the inside cut edge too, just so you don't cut your finger on the burrs left behind by the saw (or pipe cutter) when someday -- you will -- you stick your finger into the end of the post. Finish with emery cloth. Nice.
    "I did not know that!" -- J. Carson

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by JanMM View Post
    Tubing cutter works great for aluminum handlebars.
    How about for steel bars?
    Tubing cutters have to be used on cylindrical sections as they will cut a spiral groove on anything tapered so they don't work on all handlebars.

    There are cutters made to cut steel pipe but the average hardware store cutter is intended for copper pipe and steel tubing will ruin the cutter in short order. A fine tooth hacksaw is the way to go on anything steel (or carbon for that matter).

  6. #6
    headtube. zzyzx_xyzzy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    There are cutters made to cut steel pipe but the average hardware store cutter is intended for copper pipe and steel tubing will ruin the cutter in short order. A fine tooth hacksaw is the way to go on anything steel (or carbon for that matter).
    There was one project where I used a typical hardware store tubing cutter to make 195 cuts on steel electrical conduit, seemed to hold up fine. Handlebar tubing might be harder but they are up to cutting mild steel.

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    They are up to cutting hardened steel,they have a solid carbide wheel in them.
    Everything should be as simple as possible...But not more so.---Albert Einstein

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    The only problem with pipe cutters is they tend to leave a raised ridge on both sides of the cut line. You have to file or sand this off after cutting to make the post fit properly.
    Hmmm, didn't experience this. I believe my tubing cutter had rollers set to roll that raised ridge back down.
    2013 BMC TMR01 custom build, 2013 Cannondale F29er, 2012 Cannondale CAAD10 custom build
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  9. #9
    Senior Member snafu21's Avatar
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    I used both and prefer the pipe cutter. A tip from the MTB hacksaw boys who hack bars down in the wild, is to use the lockrings from a lock-on h/bar grip positioned either side of the proposed cut to keep you square.

    No good on fatter seat tubes.
    Last edited by snafu21; 06-11-10 at 07:43 AM.
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