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Old 06-06-10, 01:16 PM   #1
Gearhead65
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Tip - cutting an aluminum seatpost

I just installed a new KCNC Ti Pro Lite seatpost to replace my stock Roubaix seatpost. It was significantly longer than I needed.

A copper tubing cutter that is used for plumbing makes a GREAT seatpost cutter. Very clean cut.

FWIW.....
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Old 06-06-10, 03:57 PM   #2
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The only problem with pipe cutters is they tend to leave a raised ridge on both sides of the cut line. You have to file or sand this off after cutting to make the post fit properly.

I've cut over-long seatposts down using the same cutting guide and 32 tpi hacksaw I use for cutting fork steerer tubes. It also works well but I do file a bevel on the outside cut end of the post to make insertion in the sea tube easier.
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Old 06-06-10, 06:29 PM   #3
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Tubing cutter works great for aluminum handlebars.
How about for steel bars?
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Old 06-06-10, 07:06 PM   #4
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I've cut over-long seatposts down using the same cutting guide and 32 tpi hacksaw I use for cutting fork steerer tubes. It also works well but I do file a bevel on the outside cut end of the post to make insertion in the sea tube easier.
Good to file a bevel on the inside cut edge too, just so you don't cut your finger on the burrs left behind by the saw (or pipe cutter) when someday -- you will -- you stick your finger into the end of the post. Finish with emery cloth. Nice.
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Old 06-06-10, 07:20 PM   #5
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Tubing cutter works great for aluminum handlebars.
How about for steel bars?
Tubing cutters have to be used on cylindrical sections as they will cut a spiral groove on anything tapered so they don't work on all handlebars.

There are cutters made to cut steel pipe but the average hardware store cutter is intended for copper pipe and steel tubing will ruin the cutter in short order. A fine tooth hacksaw is the way to go on anything steel (or carbon for that matter).
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Old 06-06-10, 08:05 PM   #6
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There are cutters made to cut steel pipe but the average hardware store cutter is intended for copper pipe and steel tubing will ruin the cutter in short order. A fine tooth hacksaw is the way to go on anything steel (or carbon for that matter).
There was one project where I used a typical hardware store tubing cutter to make 195 cuts on steel electrical conduit, seemed to hold up fine. Handlebar tubing might be harder but they are up to cutting mild steel.
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Old 06-07-10, 09:25 AM   #7
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They are up to cutting hardened steel,they have a solid carbide wheel in them.
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Old 06-10-10, 06:55 PM   #8
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The only problem with pipe cutters is they tend to leave a raised ridge on both sides of the cut line. You have to file or sand this off after cutting to make the post fit properly.
Hmmm, didn't experience this. I believe my tubing cutter had rollers set to roll that raised ridge back down.
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Old 06-11-10, 06:36 AM   #9
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I used both and prefer the pipe cutter. A tip from the MTB hacksaw boys who hack bars down in the wild, is to use the lockrings from a lock-on h/bar grip positioned either side of the proposed cut to keep you square.

No good on fatter seat tubes.

Last edited by snafu21; 06-11-10 at 06:43 AM.
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