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  1. #1
    rj987652003
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    changing chainring and gear adjustment?

    Hi,

    I'm getting a 36T 116 BCD chainring in the mail today to replace the 42 chainring on my double. Do you think I'll be able to ride it as is or do you think I'll have to take it to the bike shop for a gear adjustment.

  2. #2
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rj987652003
    Hi,

    I'm getting a 36T 116 BCD chainring in the mail today to replace the 42 chainring on my double. Do you think I'll be able to ride it as is or do you think I'll have to take it to the bike shop for a gear adjustment.
    www.parktool.com repair section.Learn to adjust a derailer.It's not rocket science. If I actually gave you an answer, it would just be a guess.

  3. #3
    rj987652003
    Guest
    THanks, I need how to do these things myself. $20 every time I need the gears adjusted stinks.

  4. #4
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    How big is your outer ring? If it is a 52, you may have to upshift the front derailleur a little more slowly and carefully. Also, in the small-small combinations, your chain will sag a bit if your derailleur cannot take up the additional slack. Neither of these problems requires any derailleur adjustment, other than perhaps tightening the pivot positioning screw, to rotate an older derailleur clockwise (downward and backward, thereby increasing chain tension).

    I used to gear my Nishiki 50-47 / 14-16-18-20-23 (half-step), which I changed to 50-42 / 14-23 (Alpine or 1.5-step) on days I planned to ride through the hills of west-central Los Angeles or Malibu/Topanga. The gearing change entailed simply swapping the inner chainring, a 5-minute operation.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
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  5. #5
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John E
    How big is your outer ring? If it is a 52, you may have to upshift the front derailleur a little more slowly and carefully. Also, in the small-small combinations, your chain will sag a bit if your derailleur cannot take up the additional slack. Neither of these problems requires any derailleur adjustment, other than perhaps tightening the pivot positioning screw, to rotate an older derailleur clockwise (downward and backward, thereby increasing chain tension).

    I used to gear my Nishiki 50-47 / 14-16-18-20-23 (half-step), which I changed to 50-42 / 14-23 (Alpine or 1.5-step) on days I planned to ride through the hills of west-central Los Angeles or Malibu/Topanga. The gearing change entailed simply swapping the inner chainring, a 5-minute operation.
    Friction shifting covers lots of sins.

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