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Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

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Old 08-04-10, 06:36 AM   #1
rustycycler
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Compatibility!!! :\

Hey guys,
I'm new to the cycling world, and I've jumped into the deep end by trying to build my own road bike . I've talked to some people who have told me compatibility is one thing to watch out for when doing this. I've had a lot of conflicting answers regarding these questions, so I'm hoping that you will be able to help

1. Will the FSA RD-60 Road Wheels: http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=29734 be compatible with this 7-speed cassette: http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=47962

And 2. I currently have a 25" classic phillips road bike frame which had wheels ISO 630mm (27x1 1/4) will the wheelset in the link above be compatible with my frame?

(please say yes)
Tim x
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Old 08-04-10, 07:10 AM   #2
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1. The wheel description doesn't give much detailed information but I have to presume the rear hub width is 130 mm and it accepts Shimano 8/9/10-speed cassettes. It will accept the 7-speed cassette you show but will require a 4.5 mm spacer as 8 to 10-speed cassettes and their compatible freehub bodies are wider than 7-speed.

2a. Classic from when, the '60's, 70's, '80's? Depending on it's age your frame may have 120 mm or 126 mm rear dropout spacing and may have to be either cold-set (i.e. bent) to accept a 130 mm hub or you will have to struggle to fit it each time.

2b. The switch from 27" (ISO 630) to 700c (ISO 622) wheels will require lowering the brake shoes 4 mm so the compatibility will depend more on the brakes than the frame.
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Old 08-04-10, 08:05 AM   #3
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Hi there,
Thanks you've already been hugely helpful, by the "rear dropout spacing" do you mean between the end of the rear "forks" (sorry about my very simple wording I am new), if so I measured it and it came to between 124mm and 126mm depending on where I measured, If I measure right at the end, then it is 126mm, what does this mean? Will it still have to be bent.
Other than that, am I correct in thinking everything else will work together?
Many thanks
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Old 08-04-10, 08:56 AM   #4
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Yes, the rear dropouts are also known as the rear forks, i.e the slots where the rear wheel goes.

Based on your measurements, your spacing is nominally 126 mm "OLD" (over locknut dimension) or 6/7-speed spacing. A current 8/9/10-speed wheel hub is 130 mm OLD. A 130 mm hub can be fitted into 126 mm spacing with a bit of a struggle. It isn't a real problem but some riders prefer to have the frame cold set to make for easier wheel installation. Try it a few times and see if you find it acceptable without modification.

Again, you will have to see if the brake shoes can make the 4 mm downward adjustment needed to align with 700c rims.
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Old 08-04-10, 09:23 AM   #5
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There might be two additional things with older English bikes that you need to look out for- The bottom bracket may be 26 TPI rather than the standard English 24 TPI, and the same with the threading on the steer tube. With the headset, just re-use the threaded components if replacing, but if the bottom bracket is 26 TPI, it may need some work to change to a modern one. Sheldon Brown had some things to say about this: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/english-3.html
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Old 08-04-10, 10:14 AM   #6
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Generally any good merchant will give you compatibility information. The advantage there is that if it turns out not to be so there is some accountability, whereas if you go by info we give you and it's wrong you are out of luck. You also need to be aware of chainline when choosing bottom bracket and chainwheels or complete crankset: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chainline.html. As noted in READ this at the top of this forum Sheldon is helpful in many, many ways.
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