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  1. #1
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    newbie question: how do i raise the height of my threadless headset?

    I just got my first "real" bike in ages and after long rides my neck and wrists are a little sore, which leads me to believe I need to raise my handlebars, but I have no idea how on these threadless things:

    photo..jpgphoto(2)..jpg

    I believe its a Ritchey Logic. Can someone give me some pointers before I jump in and mess up my new bike? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Senior Member damnpoor's Avatar
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    You can add a limited amount of spacers under that one or you can get a stem that has either a different angle or length.

    Something like this is adjustable.

    ritchey-adjustab&#108.jpg

  3. #3
    Real Men Ride Ordinaries fuzz2050's Avatar
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    With a threadless headset like that, you can't actually raise the stem heigh, but you can replace the stem very easily with one that is higher up, or closer to you. Taking it to your local bike shop and explaining your problem would likely yield good results. Many bike shops have 'loner stems' that you can try out to see what fit is right for you.

  4. #4
    Don from Austin Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesiha View Post
    I just got my first "real" bike in ages and after long rides my neck and wrists are a little sore, which leads me to believe I need to raise my handlebars, but I have no idea how on these threadless things:

    photo..jpgphoto(2)..jpg

    I believe its a Ritchey Logic. Can someone give me some pointers before I jump in and mess up my new bike? Thanks!
    There is something like this: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...=263602_263622

    Or if you want more: http://www.rei.com/product/700227?cm...b-001b2166c62d

    Lot of options out there.

    Don in Austin

  5. #5
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Park Tool has some great info about threadless headsets http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=65

    Threadless headsets are very easy and secure system. However, it does require the forks steerer tube to be cut to match the rider. Once cut, the only ways to adjust height are discussed above.

    In your situation, it seems you cannot move your current stem any higher. But if needed, you can lower it by moving spacers from below the stem to above the stem (I think I see spacers below the stem in your photos).

  6. #6
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    It would be best if you had someone fairly knowledgable evaluate your fit to the bike before sinking money into a stem that may not be the correct one, or even not the correct solution at all.

  7. #7
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
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    While I agree with cny-bikeman that you will want to look at how the bike fits you overall I'm seeing a major red light with the handlebars.

    In your first picture the bars are clearly shaped so they curve down on each side of the stem clamp. At first I thought it was camera lens distortion from using the wide angle setting but the mortar lines in the wall behind the bars are straight. So it must be the bars are curved down along the top. So first off switching to bars with a straight top would be one suggestion.

    From there work with a shop that can fit you to your road bike decently. The shop to go with will be one that knows the "right" way to fit you to a road bike but that will also make any real life compromises to make you comfortable on your bike until you condition yourself to where you can get into a more proper and aggresive posture with comfort.
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

  8. #8
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    +1 on possible fit issue. Both symptoms you're describing can be caused by being too stretched out. You may be reaching uncomfortably far to reach the brake hoods which can definitely cause neck discomfort.

    "The shop to go with will be one that knows the "right" way to fit you to a road bike but that will also make any real life compromises to make you comfortable on your bike..."

    It's not always easy to find a shop that will listen to the customer and not just fit you like the employee likes to fit his own bike. Find someone who'll listen to you and fix your problem, then buy him/her a six pack and tell your friends all your friends to shop there.

  9. #9
    cab horn
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    Quote Originally Posted by damnpoor View Post
    You can add a limited amount of spacers under that one or you can get a stem that has either a different angle or length.

    Something like this is adjustable.

    ritchey-adjustab&#108.jpg
    You have no idea what you're talking about.

    That stem uses the 'nvo' system for raising and lowering the bars. You can't stack ANY spacers, there IS no spacers for that system. The OP's picture is of one where the stem is at it's max height for that steerer.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  10. #10
    cab horn
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    While I agree with cny-bikeman that you will want to look at how the bike fits you overall I'm seeing a major red light with the handlebars.

    In your first picture the bars are clearly shaped so they curve down on each side of the stem clamp. At first I thought it was camera lens distortion from using the wide angle setting but the mortar lines in the wall behind the bars are straight. So it must be the bars are curved down along the top. So first off switching to bars with a straight top would be one suggestion.

    From there work with a shop that can fit you to your road bike decently. The shop to go with will be one that knows the "right" way to fit you to a road bike but that will also make any real life compromises to make you comfortable on your bike until you condition yourself to where you can get into a more proper and aggresive posture with comfort.
    The OP has a MASI, most likely a speciale fixed/commuter. They come with drop bars, that is what those bars are called.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  11. #11
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
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    Operator, I KNOW they are drop bars. Surely by now you and I have seen each other's posts enough to give me credit for THAT much

    The part I was pointing out is that the normally straight inner section before they curve forward is also curved downwards. Not the sort of thing you see a lot and obviously not helping out with the OP's posture on the bike.
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

  12. #12
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    there are stem Risers too, like these: http://www.bbbparts.com/headparts_bhp21.php
    after trying one of these: [at the bottom of the page] http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/stems/index.html
    because I wanted to essentially restore the steerer to the height it was when shipped from the factory .3M, 300mm, then fit a second stem for my Bar Bag,
    under the primary one ..

    http://www.cyclofiend.com/working/20...clark1008.html
    Last edited by fietsbob; 08-09-10 at 07:21 PM.

  13. #13
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    Thanks for the replies everybody! The adjustable stem sounds like a good solution because I like tweaking everything bit by bit until it feels perfect. Are there any cons to getting an adjustable stem vs. a higher angle non-adjustable one?

  14. #14
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    adjustable stems come up and towards you , around the axis of the adjustment .

    there is a similar but different way the bar axis moves when it comes up parallel to the steering axis.

    You can measure that , plot it on a grid paper if you wish..
    ..

  15. #15
    17yrold in 64yrold body
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    Most people will use an adjustable stem to 'fine tune' stem angle, then get a fixed stem in the length and angle to match. Being slightly 'contrarian', I use an adjustable stem (with stem riser) all the time, so I can raise/lower my bars a little, if the mood strikes. The only 'con' I see is the slightly higher weight, and some 'clunkiness' (if you are worried about what others think).
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