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Old 09-04-10, 12:33 AM   #1
Runaway Cyclist
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Help me choose a wheel truing stand

If I could I would buy a Park Tool TS-2.2 stand no questions asked. Unfortunately, that is a way expensive stand for my budget. ETA: If I had to pay the price of the product only, it would be OK; adding shipping and taxes the cost of buying it becomes prohibitive.

I don't intend to build wheels, just do a little wheel truing and the occasional broken spoke replacement. For your information, I have a 26" urban bike and a 20" folding bike. ETA: I'm a beginner when it comes to wheel truing. I barely know what to do. I'll start by reading Sheldon's directions.

Which one of the following stands would you choose, regardless of price, and why?

1) Super-B, US$212 (in Brazil, plus shipping)

2) LIFU, US$122 (in Brazil, plus shipping)

3) No-name stand (Sunlite?), US$111,22 (including shipping)

ETA:

4) Feedback Sports Truing Station, approximately US$111 (including shipping) here and here, positive review, not so positive reviews here, here and here, a satisfied Bike Forums member, and manufacturer's site.

ETA: prices of the first two are not in dollars on the sites, so I added the approximately prices in dollars (shipping not included). Yes, bike products are expensive here in Brazil.

I'm looking for a wheel truing stand that costs no more than US$50 (not including shipping). I'm not in the USA, so the seller must ship to Brazil and accept PayPal. I appreciate any suggestions.

Last edited by Runaway Cyclist; 09-05-10 at 02:05 PM. Reason: to provide additional information
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Old 09-04-10, 05:51 AM   #2
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just use your frame and a zip tie. at that price it is not worth it
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Old 09-04-10, 06:58 AM   #3
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Another possibility is to get a junked bike. Remove and use the fork upside down for the front wheel and cut off the rear triangle and use the dropouts for rear wheel truing. You should be able to make indicators from a trashed set of brakes.
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Old 09-04-10, 07:11 AM   #4
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just use your frame and a zip tie. at that price it is not worth it
how do you do this? do you have pics of the setup?
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Old 09-04-10, 07:14 AM   #5
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how do you do this? do you have pics of the setup?
You just install the wheel in your bike as it would be normally and use a zip-tie wrapped around a stay or the fork blade with the end left long enough to run near the brake track as an indicator. You can also use your brake shoes as indicators and this is commonly recommended.
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Old 09-04-10, 10:52 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reptilezs View Post
just use your frame and a zip tie. at that price it is not worth it
Note that the prices of the first two stands are not in dollars; but even in dollars, they are very high, I know.

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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Another possibility is to get a junked bike. Remove and use the fork upside down for the front wheel and cut off the rear triangle and use the dropouts for rear wheel truing. You should be able to make indicators from a trashed set of brakes.
I'm aware of all the DIY solutions, but I'm a beginner. I think it'll be easier to learn wheel truing on a proper rack, albeit a poor quality one.

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how do you do this? do you have pics of the setup?
There are several threads about DIY truing stands, like this one:

Here's a Cheap, Homemade Truing Stand
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Old 09-04-10, 05:00 PM   #7
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Don't know if you can buy from them, but this will work. http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...6_10000_200496
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Old 09-04-10, 05:48 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reptilezs View Post
just use your frame and a zip tie. at that price it is not worth it
Why even bother with a zip tie? Just adjust your brakes down tighter and tighter as you true the wheel up.

I've built 4 of my wheels that way - 5 if you count having to rebuild the rear wheel I experimented with 15/17 gauge double-butted spokes. It was nice and light - but I snapped two or three drive-side spokes during sprint intervals after only a couple hundred miles on the wheel...
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Old 09-04-10, 06:02 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Runaway Cyclist View Post
If I could I would buy a Park Tool stand no questions asked. Unfortunately, that is a way expensive stand for my budget. ETA: If I had to pay the price of the product only, it would be OK; adding shipping and taxes the cost of buying it becomes prohibitive.

I don't intend to build wheels, just do a little wheel truing and the occasional broken spoke replacement. For your information, I have a 26" urban bike and a 20" folding bike. ETA: I'm a beginner when it comes to wheel truing. I barely know what to do. I'll start by reading Sheldon's directions.

Which one of the following stands would you choose, regardless of price, and why?

1) Super-B, US$212

2) LIFU, US$122

3) No-name stand (Sunlite?), US$111,22 (including shipping)

ETA: prices of the first two are not in dollars on the sites, so I added the approximately prices in dollar (shipping not included). Yes, bike products are expensive here in Brazil.

I'm looking for a wheel truing stand that costs no more than US$50 (not including shipping). I'm not in the USA, so the seller must ship to Brazil and accept PayPal. I appreciate any suggestions.
The E-bay stand isn't a bad stand. I built many wheels with a Minoura stand just like that one. It works and gets the job done.

Quote:
Originally Posted by reptilezs View Post
just use your frame and a zip tie. at that price it is not worth it
While this method or the brake pads method works, it does get old fast, especially if you want to build more than a few wheels. It's not all that easy to turn the bike upside down and find a comfortable way to get the proper sightlines. A truing stand can be set on a table or bench so that it's at a comfortable height to work at.

Building your own is another option but that assumes that you have access to the tools to build the stand. If you don't and you don't have the materials at hand, you could spend more money on trying to build one than just buying one.
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Old 09-04-10, 08:28 PM   #10
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Don't know if you can buy from them, but this will work. http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...6_10000_200496
Nashbar doesn't accept PayPal as a payment method. Thanks anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
The E-bay stand isn't a bad stand. I built many wheels with a Minoura stand just like that one. It works and gets the job done.
I am inclined to buy that one. Thanks for sharing your experience.
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Old 09-04-10, 08:39 PM   #11
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Just retired my old stand after many years of building and truing wheels (and I do this for a living)... replaced it with a chromed version with a shorter stem as I needed a little more clearance above it.



You don't need a rear triangle to build / true wheels... just mount the wheel to the outside of the fork leg and work on it from there.
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Old 09-04-10, 08:56 PM   #12
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Sixty Fiver, that must be an old photo. Looks like you have it sitting on an old oil space heater. Haven't seen one of those in years.

How do you center the rim? Do you just reverse it in the fork without moving the gauge?
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Old 09-05-10, 02:08 PM   #13
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I have just found another stand on eBay:

4) Feedback Sports Truing Station, approximately US$111 (including shipping) here and here, a positive review, not so positive reviews here, here and here, a satisfied Bike Forums member, and the manufacturer's site.

What do you think about that one arm stand?
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Old 09-05-10, 02:26 PM   #14
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Sixty Fiver, that must be an old photo. Looks like you have it sitting on an old oil space heater. Haven't seen one of those in years.

How do you center the rim? Do you just reverse it in the fork without moving the gauge?
Not so old... it was the natural gas space heater in my old shop (we have not used oil heaters here since before I was born) and working over this on cold winter days was very nice...

I can dish wheels by flipping the wheel and checking it against the dial indicator... it is more accurate than using a dish gauge.

I have added a lower indicator on the new stand for vertical truing as I was using the dial indicator for this (or a zip tie) too but that meant I was always moving the dial indicator around.
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Old 09-05-10, 04:07 PM   #15
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As mentioned above, homebuilt options can be really great, but do require some tools and materials to bring together. This one didn't cost me very much. The book that included the plans was ~$15 and the rest cost me about $14 .

-Jeremy

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Old 09-05-10, 04:14 PM   #16
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there is a thread somewhere about nashbar selling the park for like 150 for laborday

personally I would love the one above just to put on my book case.
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Old 09-05-10, 04:15 PM   #17
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Dishing gages are handy, Not too costly. other than that the stand holds the wheel up
so a reference guide shows where the high spots are as the rim passes by the reference..
The Plywood one looks just fine..

Perhaps add,
a duplicate set of dropouts to pre set the QR's and try out the bearing adjustment
under compression
before you put the wheel in the bike..

Last edited by fietsbob; 09-05-10 at 04:21 PM.
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