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  1. #1
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    spoke threading machine

    Ive got a spoke threading machine from ebay. As usual...I blindly bought it, without asking questions.
    its got a die for 15 guage spokes. my wheels have 14 guage spokes.

    I was wondering if theres a shop that sells spoke dies.

    the one in the machine is like a regular die. just a flat disc. with 3 holes round the centre. It says Bradbury on the die.

    other spoke dies Ive seen are complex looking things, with rollers to cut the threads. I dont know if they will fit my machine

    Im in Scotland. So looking for one in the UK

  2. #2
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    bicycle spokes have rolled threads, not cut like normal threads so the od of the spoke thread is larger than the wire itself. maybe you bought a machine for motorcycle spokes?? i am not sure

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by reptilezs View Post
    bicycle spokes have rolled threads, not cut like normal threads so the od of the spoke thread is larger than the wire itself. maybe you bought a machine for motorcycle spokes?? i am not sure
    Well, good bicycle spokes have rolled threads and good spoke threaders (like the Phil Wood threader) do roll the threads. There are less expensive threaders that cut threads with a standard-type threading die which do work but the spokes aren't as durable.

    The OP will have to conatct the threading machine's manufacturer to see what other dies are available as spoke threads are pretty much specific to bicycles and you won't find the proper die elsewhere.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    Well, good bicycle spokes have rolled threads and good spoke threaders (like the Phil Wood threader) do roll the threads. There are less expensive threaders that cut threads with a standard-type threading die which do work but the spokes aren't as durable.
    There's a fundemental difference between cut and rolled threads. Sketch

    With cut threads the full profile of the thread is cut into the blank, which is the diameter of the crest of the thread, and the extra metal is removed.

    With rolled threads, no metal is removed. Instead you start with a blank whose diameter is halfway between the outside and inner tread diameter, and flow metal from the troughs to form the peaks.

    1.8mm and 2mm spoke threads are rolled, and the threads have a larger diameter than the spoke wire. While you can cut the same threads into the wire, you would only have the troughs and the crests would be missing. There's no difference in strength of the spoke since the thread depth is the same, but the holding power of the nipple would be severely compromised. You could cut a smaller thread but then you'd never find nipples to fit.
    Last edited by FBinNY; 09-06-10 at 09:27 AM.
    FB
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  5. #5
    Bianchi Goddess Bianchigirll's Avatar
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    can you post a pic? this is the only spoke threader I am familiar with.
    and I believe it rolls the threads as stated above. you also IIRC simple tighten the nut on the outside to deepen the thread or adjust the guage of the spoke. http://biketoolsetc.com/index.cgi?id...tem_id=HZ-C700
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    There's no difference in strength of the spoke since the thread depth is the same, but the holding power of the nipple would be severely compromised. You could cut a smaller thread but then you'd never find nipples to fit.
    OK, I mistyped that the spoke itself would be weaker but, as you note, the spoke/nipple interface will be. Then again, rolled threads cold work the spoke metal and leave a more rounded and smoother profile at the root of the threads so I do think the spoke itself will also be stronger.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    OK, I mistyped that the spoke itself would be weaker but, as you note, the spoke/nipple interface will be. Then again, rolled threads cold work the spoke metal and leave a more rounded and smoother profile at the root of the threads so I do think the spoke itself will also be stronger.
    We're debating meaningless subtleties here. The issue is that the OP would need 2.2mm spokes in order to cut standard 2mm spoke threads that are rolled onto a 2mm spoke. It isn't a matter of choice, so any debate into strength issues are moot.
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  8. #8
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    I found a website about a company called Bradbury that made sewing machine, then bicycles. the pictures were all pen and ink, looked about 100 years old. they mentioned bike manufacture into the 1950s. Dont know if thats the company that made my machine. It does look like a sewing machine. very old too.

    I tried cutting a 14 guage spoke with it. got a couple of mm onto it. jammed. as it was cutting the metal quite a bit thinner.

    I did have a simmilar spoke threading machine. But gave all my possesions away before I got made homeless. Im ok now. got a place to stay
    It had Mikado embosed on it. with the roller wheels. 14 guage. I made up a few replacement spokes for wheels.

    Im building a folding bike now. Ive got an Atom drum brake hub. Im wanting it to be single speed in a 406 20" alloy rim. so would be difficult getting factory made spokes that size. Also going to put a Sturmey Archer AG hub into a 700c rim, for my Raleigh roadster bike.

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    You'll be able to get custom length spokes from Kinetics http://www.kinetics.org.uk/index.html or from any shop that specialises in recumbents. Have a look at http://www.velovision.co.uk/ for some other options.

  10. #10
    Senior Member limeylew's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bianchigirll View Post
    can you post a pic? this is the only spoke threader I am familiar with.
    and I believe it rolls the threads as stated above. you also IIRC simple tighten the nut on the outside to deepen the thread or adjust the guage of the spoke. http://biketoolsetc.com/index.cgi?id...tem_id=HZ-C700
    This is my favorite spoke threading machine.

    The 3 little rolling dies come in 2 forms. The cheaper set is for galvanized spokes and the more expensive set is for stainless. I always use Castrol 'Moly D' oil as my lube and have threaded at least 8 sets of spokes before the dies begin to dull.
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