Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Northern VA, USA
    My Bikes
    '98 Cannondale Super-v 700
    Posts
    68
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    What is better about a better derailleur?

    Whats the difference between a $40 derailleur and a $120 derailleur? Honest question, I'd really like to know

  2. #2
    Queen of France Indolent58's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    My Bikes
    Look 565, Trek 2120
    Posts
    3,806
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    $80 and weight

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    AZ
    My Bikes
    Landshark Road/Soul Cycles Single Speed
    Posts
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Better derailleurs generally have better bushings in their pulleys. The cheapest are just plastic spinning on steel. The better ones have either ceramic bushings or cartridge bearings, which are both smoother and last longer.

    As mentioned, weight is also generally a factor.

    On the road bike, where derailleurs last a long time, the nicer ones may be worth it, but I’ve ruined way too many riding mountain bikes to ever think about spending the $$ on an XTR.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    St Peters, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
    Posts
    23,582
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In a word, "crispness".

  5. #5
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,428
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Indolent58
    $80 and weight
    Bling and poseur' points too.

  6. #6
    Hardtail WorldWind's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Az. & Ca.
    My Bikes
    Richey Everest, Supercomp, Richey custom handbuilt Road, and others.
    Posts
    663
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The better components are easer to install, and adjust.

    They stay in adjustment longer and function better.

  7. #7
    Just ride. roadbuzz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    C-ville, Va
    Posts
    3,237
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If you want better shifting, get better levers. If you want to go faster, get better wheels. Either one will cost more than the derailleur. If you've got crappy levers, it's unlikely you'll notice any benefit from the new derailleur!

    If the overall bike is of a good enough quality to upgrade, upgrading the derailleur is pretty far down the list, IMO. If not, you get a lot more bang for the buck buying a better bike!

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Northern VA, USA
    My Bikes
    '98 Cannondale Super-v 700
    Posts
    68
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The bike is pretty good, its an old cannondale super v. I really like it. I'm giving it a total overhual over the next several months, in a few steps. First step is the drivetrain. Its rather worn, and the rear derailleur is tweaked slightly, but I want upgrade to 9 speed anyways So I'm trying to decide what derailleur (and shifter) to get.

    I don't mind spending some good cash to get quality, but not so much that I'm spending $50 more for something only slightly better. I'm trying to figure out where that point of deminishing returns is at.

  9. #9
    Just ride. roadbuzz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    C-ville, Va
    Posts
    3,237
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oops. That's a mtn bike, isn't it? I'm out of my area of expertise. In any case, if you're upgrading to a different number of rear cogs, you may have to upgrade shifters... not sure about mtn bike components.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Northern VA, USA
    My Bikes
    '98 Cannondale Super-v 700
    Posts
    68
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah its an mtb. I forgot this isn't an mtb specific forum so I didn't mention that. oops

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,295
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The four "more modern" mountain bikes we've owned came with the cheaper front deraileur (just below below LX). They did fine until they wore some. Then they would take much longer to shift and would not stay adjusted. We've used LX, XT and XTR with about 7 bikes (4 ATB and 3 road) over the years. I'd say XT is a little faster shifting than LX. XTR is about the same as XT, but it's a lot more ruggedly built. For my money, LX is the best value. XTR has gotten too expensive; they don't discount it like they used too anymore. Probably due to the decline in the value of the dollar.

    For the rear, our only experience is with LX and XT. I have never noticed a difference for the rear.

    Al

  12. #12
    The Rabbi seely's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    4,929
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can tell a pretty huge difference between say Alivio and XT, but go from XT to XTR and there isn't much of a perceptible difference. Same for like Tiagra vs. Ultegra vs. Dura Ace. I do like using XTR rears on my mountain bikes becuase they do last forever, and are rediculously smooth. On my road bike I have an old Ultegra 600 (probably 10-12 years old) and its smooth like butter. For the fronts anything goes... they all basically work the same and shift the same. If you have LX/105 or better shifters you will notice a difference in response and the smoothness as well.

  13. #13
    Senior Member SanDiegoSteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    San Diego
    My Bikes
    Felt Fc, beach cruiser
    Posts
    244
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Spring quality and tension are the biggest. Those translate into the "crisper" shifting as well as chain slap/suck control (different springs for both).

    The pulleys make a little bit of difference.

    For your own perception (maybe your buddies too), there might be some cool factor.

    I really question weight. The weight of dirt in your tires will be more than what you save, but to some, every gram counts.

    On the road, I ended up with the top end Dura Ace through a good deal. Love it.
    On the trails, I go middle of the road since I tend to fall/hit things that lower the life span. XTR is nicer than XT for sure, but at the replacement price point, I've been very happy with XT.

  14. #14
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,428
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by WorldWind
    The better components are easer to install, and adjust.
    Really??...........

  15. #15
    The Rabbi seely's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    4,929
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As far as I know, with XTR you still have to screw it onto the hanger, set the limits and fuss with cable tension. Same as Alivio

  16. #16
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,428
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by seely
    As far as I know, with XTR you still have to screw it onto the hanger, set the limits and fuss with cable tension. Same as Alivio
    ....and attach the cable.

  17. #17
    Über member! sorebutt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Sunnyvale, CA.
    My Bikes
    2004 Albert Eisentraut
    Posts
    993
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "better" dérailleurs are made better with more expensive an lighter materials. However, there is a point of diminishing return, when you go to more expensive dérailleurs. As you go higher in teh groupo hierarchy you pay more and more for a smaller and smaller return for your money..

    Typically the mid point in the groupo hierarchy is the best value. Ex: Ultegra or Centaur...
    "With a bent derailleur, shift happens"...

    ~~~~- My Mellow-Yellow-Velo -~~~~

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Hamilton
    My Bikes
    97 thin blue line rigid mtb, mid 80s norco monterey sl, gave away the rest recently
    Posts
    103
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've used older altus, alivio, acera x, lx, and xt rear derailleurs. As well as lots of really crappy ones. I've never done a test of trying out each one with the same shifters, but I certainly noticed a differenc on the way up the hierarchy. On the road it's neglible, but obviously on the trail the difference is more profound. I don't know if they still make it, but the acera x was just fine, the lx works no problems (8 years old and been crashed), as long as I keep it tuned right, and the xt was a bit better. But for me the lx is just right because it's what's sitting on my bike right now. No need to upgrade. For my front derailleur I had an stx-rc and it was pretty good, a little finicky with tuning, but that seized up steel/aluminium stylee. So now I've got an old alivio on there and I really don't notice a difference. I'm running 8 speed xt shifters. The biggest upgrade to your shifting is knowing how to tune them right, and making sure all your parts are compatible. Right now I'm running too big of a third chainring, so I'm having to fudge the setup, forcing me to shift the front more often to avoid rubbing. I'm either going to change my front shifter to an old exage friction thumbshifter, or take of the big ring and put a bashguard on and be done with it. More offroading or more touring with the trailer... tough choice

  19. #19
    Senior Member smurfy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Posts
    1,159
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can really tell the difference in a racing situation. I was once in a mtn bike race with an STX-RC group and an LX rear derailler (and Gripshift) and the shifting was very sloppy! It shifted fine just riding around.
    "You handle it like you handle a bicycle" - Jacques Rosay, Airbus A380 test pilot

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Hamilton
    My Bikes
    97 thin blue line rigid mtb, mid 80s norco monterey sl, gave away the rest recently
    Posts
    103
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I find the biggest difference in performance is between my bike (lx rear, stx-rc front, xt shifters) being freshly tuned or not quite right. When it's tuned right I have no problems. Of course someone else could hop on my bike and have troubles because they wouldn't know the what little tricks to use in each shifting situation. You know what I mean. When your setup isn't running quite right and you hold that shifter in a bit to force the chain over, then ease it up. Or when it's really bad and shift up twice and down once. hehehe When my setup is freshly tuned there's is a slight bit of that, but since the bike has seen 8 years of heavy use, I guess I'm not too worried about it. It's all part of the experience. More organic

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •