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Thread: Do I bother?

  1. #1
    τΏτ jshelly's Avatar
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    Do I bother?

    Need some opinions from people with some more experience then I have which is probably everyone here.

    10 year old LBS run-of-the-mill hybrid GT Arette that I have ridden on and off for the past 10 years although lately more on - details of recent rides in the link of my signature.

    I am currently riding this bike primarily for fitness and years of use have rendered it's ultra-cheap components practically useless - chain rings and jockey wheels are missing teeth etc.. etc...

    My question is with all of these relatively affordable road bikes do I bother to fix this bike up or simply scrap it?

    I have zero experience with a wrench although I consider myself pretty handy.

    If you need any additional details don't hesitate to ask

    Thanks in advance.



    Last edited by jshelly; 10-02-10 at 12:32 PM.

  2. #2
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    Clean it up, sell it, and get yourself a nice, used road bike. You can find a really nice USED road bike for less than the cost of an upgrade, particularly if you pay retail for parts, or pay someone to install them. The only way I have economically upgraded a bike is by finding a donor bike cheap, then swapping parts. Even then, if I paid someone to do the work, it would be cheaper for me to just buy a nicer used bike. Even though you are handy, you will need some specialized tools to upgrade that bike (depending how deep you get into it). You can pay a shop to do some of the specialty work, then your regular hand tools can do most of what is left. But it is way cheaper to just buy something equipped the way you want it.

  3. #3
    I'm Carbon Curious 531phile's Avatar
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    If it just needs one new chainring and a jockey wheel. That should not be an expensive fix, even if you have the bike shop do it and even order it. But I bet it needs a new chain and cog as well which will add to the cost. It might even be cost effective to replace the whole crankset as well since the other two chainrings will most likely worn or close to being worn. So you are looking at around $60-80 worth of parts not including the labor. If you will get the shop to do this it would cost overall around $100.

    I'd say get a new road bike. sounds like you are ready to graduate from hybrid bikes. My first real bike was a hybrid. Rode the hell out of it for two years and then decided road bikes were more my thing. I like going faster. Maybe you are the same way?

    Quote Originally Posted by avner View Post
    I loled. Twice. Then I cried. Then I rubbed one out and cried again, but thanks for sharing.

  4. #4
    LET'S ROLL 1nterceptor's Avatar
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    You like the bike, some parts are worn out.
    My take is to just replace the broken parts.
    Repairing something instead of replacing it,
    is better for your wallet and the planet

  5. #5
    Senior Member surreal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1nterceptor View Post
    You like the bike, some parts are worn out.
    My take is to just replace the broken parts.
    Repairing something instead of replacing it,
    is better for your wallet and the planet
    +1. "Worth it" is a subjective thing; but i think that using stuff we already got is more conservation-minded, even if we are going thru chains and whatnot fairly regularly. Which brings me to my next point: from a purely financial standpoint, you're going to need to buy new chains, jockeys, tires, tubes, rings, cassettes, brake pads/etc for any bike that you use a lot. Even if you get a new or lightly used bike to replace this one, you will find yourself in that exact position a few seasons from now anyway...

    But, really, it comes down to a matter of sentimentality and practicality, and finding where the 2 intersect. If you truly loved this hybrid, you wouldn't even ask this sort of question. If you hated it, same thing. You need to figure out whether sinking a few hundred bucks into this one'd be better than spending even more money on a bike that may be more suitable.

    -rob
    (for the record, i'd fix this bike and keep it, unless you have your heart set on a roadie.)

  6. #6
    Cyclist storckm's Avatar
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    If you like the bike, then go ahead and fix it. You'll learn something. If you don't like the bike, then find one you like. But I wouldn't buy a bike just to have a new bike, unless it was also a bike that was a pleasure to ride and did what I needed (which for me would probably mean a used bike, since I like fenders, tires wider than 25mm, etc.)

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    The middle and top chainrings may have shorter teeth in some spots in order to facilitate shifting. Some new cranksets have that. There's a test which shows if the crankset is worn out. You pull on one of the chain's pins on the front of the chainring and see how far it rises. I forget how much is acceptable.

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    Senior Member 009jim's Avatar
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    Looks like a good bike to me. I would seriously try to keep it. We are all tempted on a daily basis to throw stuff out and buy new. That's what's destroying our environment.

  9. #9
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    +1 It really depends how much you want to change. Replacing a few worn parts is no big deal, and won't cost much. Its when riders want to make major changes, such as converting to STI shifting, etc., that the upgrade gets costly and moving on to another bike makes more sense.

  10. #10
    Senior Member curbtender's Avatar
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    Got a place like this close by? http://www.car-free.org/bbc/bbc.html tools, classes, parts

  11. #11
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    It depends on how happy you are with the feel of this bike. Different bikes are going to be more, or less, comfortable because of gearing, geometry, and construction. I've gone through three bikes that I use for commuting to work. Each had a different feel. I am happiest with my '96 Trek 830. For me, it is the most comfortable and enjoyable ride. It wouldn't be my first choice for fire-trails, but definitely for a twenty-mile ride.

    When I started, I didn't know anything about wrenching, either. A few basic tools will let you do the simple stuff: changing derailleurs, chainrings and cassettes, and adjusting brakes. As your skills increase, you add tools. Changing the worn parts on your bike won't be difficult. If you shop carefully, it may not even be overly expensive. Sometimes though, cost becomes the price for learning. On my second commuter, I changed the entire drivetrain. Converted it from a 10 speed to an 18 speed, upgraded derailleurs front and back, changed to gripshifts from thumbshifts. Was it more than the bike was worth? Maybe, but I rode it for two years and learned a lot about mechanics from the money that I spent. I still use that one for my winter bike. Now, I do all of my own maintainance and upgrades. So, in a way, the money I spent on that project saved me a bundle down the road.

    If you aren't happy with the ride and fit though, you may want to try looking at other bikes.

    Walt

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    frame looks to be in great shape, definately worth fixing up even if you are ready to graduate to a true road bike. I now have 2 bikes and I absolutely love it. A nice light racy setup bike and a solid comfy upright commuter that I"ve been putting together. Its nice to have options. Also, it won't cost you much to fix it up, check ebay and you can find whole brand new cranks for cheap, chains are cheap, and you can even find new deraileurs or lightly used ones cheap. Also, the learning that you will do on this bike willl assist you in maintaining a nicer new bike down the road when you need to do something to it and taking it to the lbs isn't always feasible.


    also, it's nice toahve a second bike available to let a friend try out as well.

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    I would fix this bike. New chain (20) + new cogs (25) + new chainrings (new crank is probably cheaper than replacing rings one-by-one) (75) + new jockey wheels (15) + new cables (15) + new tires (50) + new grips (10) = basically a new bike for $200 or less. You may need a couple of tools to put the whole thing together.
    Since you rode this bike to the point of wearing everything out, this is obviously a good bike for you. Any new bike may or may not be as comfortable or as useful to you.

    Make sure the things you are replacing really need to be replaced, too. Sometimes things like 'missing chainring teeth' are actually teeth shaped differently during manufacture to help the chain move between rings. Your bike looks so immaculately clean that I can't imagine how worn or damaged any individual components are.

    If you want a road bike, though, buy a road bike. Then you will have two bikes - a bad weather/rough road hybrid, and a road bike.

  14. #14
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
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    Every serious rider needs a second bike (or third, fourth or N+1 ) as a spare, loaner or just a jump up grab n'go errand bike. This oldie sounds like the perfect candidate for fixing what needs fixing, doing a go over and tune up on the rest and set it up with flat pedals for occasional short ride errands or for those days when you go on some park trail casual ride with some casual beach cruiser buddies.
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

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    Pwnerer Wordbiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    Every serious rider needs a second bike (or third, fourth or N+1 ) as a spare, loaner or just a jump up grab n'go errand bike. This oldie sounds like the perfect candidate for fixing what needs fixing, doing a go over and tune up on the rest and set it up with flat pedals for occasional short ride errands or for those days when you go on some park trail casual ride with some casual beach cruiser buddies.
    Agreed. Some racks, fenders and the replacement parts would make for a very reliable utility bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
    Ski, bike and wish I was gay.

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    Senior Member cracker7213's Avatar
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    jshelly,

    That bike doesn't look so bad. the only big problem I see is that is has rivet chain rings. If you were going to replace one of the chain rings, you would have to replace them all. This wood require you to buy a new crank set most likely. Thats probably the biggest problem. To fix the rest ie, True the wheels, new cassette, and chain would cost between $100 and $150. Depending on your LBS and the quality of the parts. I would sell it right now, or put the $200 to $250 into it and just keep riding it!

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    cranks can be had very cheap. here is one for $25 http://cgi.ebay.com/Square-taper-Shi...item230a948503

    I will also add that i'm not sure what you mean by "all these relatively affordable road bikes" if you are talking used, then you could still find yourself needing to replace parts on it. If your talking new, your really not geting a new road bike for very cheap. This bike can be fixed up for a couple hundred bucks. $300 at the most and even if you end up selling it, you should be able to recoup most of that.

  18. #18
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
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    If you ever planned on becoming a bit more self sufficient in your bike wrenching then this would be an excellent time to do so. By all means by a new or newer used bike as a main regular use bike. That way you get the big upgrade that you're wanting. Then you can spare the time to shop for the parts you need for cheap and to pick up the tools and do the jobs that are needed on this bike to restore it to full on functionality. All in all the need to buy some of the specialty tools such as a crank arm puller and the like will bump up the price of this tune up but figure that you're also getting tools that will be useful for many years to come and that will allow you to do a lot more of any future work for yourself.

    As for a guide on how to do the work there's tons of good information at www.sheldonbrown.com and www.parktool.com/repair .
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

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    That's probably the cleanest worn out bike I've ever seen. I'd keep it.

  20. #20
    τΏτ jshelly's Avatar
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    I can't thank you all enough for such great feedback.

    Overall, I would like to learn how to wrench and I do like the bike so the route I think I am going to take is buy a new road bike - I have my eye on a Giant Defy 2 and then keep this bike and fix it up.

    Although it's a relatively cheap hybrid, it has been reliable, and rides well.

    Thanks again,

    Jeff

  21. #21
    Senior Member surreal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jshelly View Post
    I can't thank you all enough for such great feedback.

    Overall, I would like to learn how to wrench and I do like the bike so the route I think I am going to take is buy a new road bike - I have my eye on a Giant Defy 2 and then keep this bike and fix it up.

    Although it's a relatively cheap hybrid, it has been reliable, and rides well.

    Thanks again,

    Jeff

    I love happy endings.

    -rob

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