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Old 10-04-10, 05:08 PM   #1
bykemike 
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Putting on a new set of pedals

I received my new set of Ultegra PD-6700 pedals today so I figured I would just remove my 6
month old set of rusted PD-MB20 pedals, install the new ones and go biking....NOT!

I have had bikes for a long time and have changed lots of pedals but to get these recently installed MB's out I ended up using an Oxyacetylene torch and a 1/2" impact driver chucked up to 100psi of air pressure. I realize I ride along A1A and am subject to salt air but this was way over the top as far as I'm concerned.
The pedals were installed by my LBS. They wouldn't have tightened them that much, I don't think they even have the tools to do that. I was wondering if they installed them dry.

I installed my new set using a product we use in the marine industry called Tef-Gel, sort of an anti-seize on steroids for aluminium in salt air.

You haven't lived until you realize you are about to heat up a 6 month old FSA crankset on a new carbon bike. But there was no other way.
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Old 10-04-10, 05:11 PM   #2
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Make sure to grease the new ones for the next guy.
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Old 10-04-10, 05:29 PM   #3
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I like pedal washers , TA makes them , they go between the steel pedal axle,
and the aluminum crank arm.
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Old 10-04-10, 06:52 PM   #4
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Yikes dude! I would be very careful riding on those cranks now. I've seen some of the nastiest pics out there of riders cranks breaking. Usually they were the old style forged cranks, but since you took a torch to your cranks, who knows how much you might have weakened it?
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Old 10-05-10, 03:27 AM   #5
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I'd have tried drilling most of the pedal axel out from behind, which would have hopefully taken enough tension out of the binding of the threads that you wouldn't have needed all that much force.
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Old 10-05-10, 03:52 AM   #6
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The real problem is steel threads matching aluminum threads. Steel and aluminum reacts and sort of weld together in time.
I just had to cut a valve stem with some pliers off a car wheel because the fancy aluminum cap was stuck (and had 10mm hex cap that of course I tried to remove with a hex key with no luck, I just mashed the hex head)
Similar I had to torch out a centering ring on the car hub (used for fitting an aftermarket rim with larger inner hole)

To prevent such things use antiseize grease, but most important try to match materials, steel with steel and aluminum with aluminum, if not possible at least try to find chrome plated steel (on the threads too) - that shiny steel. It locks a bit less than regular steel.

Anyway it's prone to stuck aluminum with steel - like a BB in an aluminum frame, a steel headset in aluminum frame, fixed gear cogs on aluminum hubs, freewheels on aluminum hubs, steel seatpost in aluminum frame, etc.- thousands of this stuck cases.
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Old 10-05-10, 09:50 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
I like pedal washers , TA makes them , they go between the steel pedal axle,
and the aluminum crank arm.
Bike Tools, Etc. has less expensive ones. $2/pair or $14 for 30 pieces:

http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cg...d=US-PEDWASH/2

http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cg..._id=US-PEDWASH
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Old 10-05-10, 09:51 AM   #8
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I'd have tried drilling most of the pedal axel out from behind, which would have hopefully taken enough tension out of the binding of the threads that you wouldn't have needed all that much force.
Pedal axles are case-hardened which makes them difficult to drill.
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Old 10-05-10, 11:20 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
Bike Tools, Etc. has less expensive ones. $2/pair or $14 for 30 pieces:

http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cg...d=US-PEDWASH/2

http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cg..._id=US-PEDWASH
I sometimes use them, but would/do they really keep threads from seizing? I thought that's what grease was for.
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Old 10-05-10, 11:56 AM   #10
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I sometimes use them, but would/do they really keep threads from seizing? I thought that's what grease was for.
They help reduce fretting damage at the pedal eye. Use anti-seize on the threads and a washer on the axle and all is good.
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Old 10-05-10, 12:49 PM   #11
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You could have also tried to freeze the pedal spindle to break their threads away from the crank through thermal shrinking. Less likely to damage the crank that way. Worked nicely for me when I took off a super stuck stem and BB from my frame and fork last year.

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