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  1. #1
    Senior Member puckett129's Avatar
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    Replacing a group on a cross bike

    I have just purchased a new group to go on a "franken-bike" that I have. It's a Redline Conquest Pro frame with a campy crank, SRAM cassette, and Shimano drivetrain and it's a 9 speed - so I am going with a brand new 105 group. I have already had to replace the used shift levers with another set of used shift levers, and because it's a 9 speed set-up would have to do it again if something went wrong. I don't have a lot of experience with what I would consider major bike stuff (bottom bracket, changing the cassette, etc) so I am a little concerned. I am also a little worried about getting the rear derailleur adjusted properly.

    So.. what tools will I need?

    Bottom bracket tool, chain whip, assorted allen wrenches, and other wrenches. Anything else?

    Anything to watch out for when removing the old BB, cassette, or putting the new ones on?

    I would like to do this one myself for a few reasons. I want to get better at bike maintenance to save money and as a sense of accomplishment. I want a new bike, which I will essentially have once I'm done. I have recently begun riding again after almost 20 years since I was a kid. Back then I had a steel frame Bridgestone with low end Shimano parts and I could only dream of riding a nice set-up. I used to look through catalogs at the LBS and drool.

    Once this little project is complete I will essentially have a nice, new bike the way it would have come originally, with a few upgrades. With the amount of money I have already put in, I would have been better off buying a new set-up, but live and learn.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you,

    Puckett

  2. #2
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Have a bike Co Op to work on your bike? so you dont need 2x the tools , to remove stuff you are not going to use,
    + the new stuff you will use again... if Cross races are in the plan, you will be fixing and cleaning often ..

    Get a repair stand, to hold the bike up while you work on it. clean tune up etc.

    there's folding ones , and get a stool to sit on rather than the floor , for low stuff..

  3. #3
    Senior Member puckett129's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    Have a bike Co Op to work on your bike? so you dont need 2x the tools , to remove stuff you are not going to use,
    + the new stuff you will use again... if Cross races are in the plan, you will be fixing and cleaning often ..

    Get a repair stand, to hold the bike up while you work on it. clean tune up etc.

    there's folding ones , and get a stool to sit on rather than the floor , for low stuff..
    Thank you.

    No bike co-op in the area... halfway between NYC and Albany (both with co-ops). I'll keep looking. If anyone knows of this kind of resource in the hudson valley I'd love to hear about it. I have some people that I can ask about tools.

    The bike won't be so much for actual cross racing, but more for 25 - 75 mile rides on light to moderate trails in the area in state parks and on old rail road tracks. Some are smooth, some, not so smooth.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    A bottom bracket tool and a shimano/sram cassette lockring tool (in addition to the chainwhip) are both worthwhile investments (they pay for themselves in one or two uses). Cable housing cutters, as well (just because they weren't mentioned), and a solid workstand of some sort is important.

    Getting derailers adjusted will be a learning experience- I suggest buying an extra cable or two, just in case, so you have spares on-hand.

    As for things to watch out for- just make sure you thread the BB straight and in the right direction (and grease it), and when assembling the cassette, make sure everything is seated right before you go cranking the lockring on.

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