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  1. #1
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    Cassette Lockring???

    My cassette has a really weird lock-ring on it how do i take it off and i just moved in to my new aparment so i dont have many tools?

    this is the cassette:

  2. #2
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    You do not have a cassette, you have a freewheel. To remove you will need to obtain a tool such as a Park FR-2 and a wrench big enough to fit over it.

    http://www.parktool.com/product/freewheel-remover-1

    -j

  3. #3
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    +1 yup you have a freewheel
    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/bustercrb/sets/72157623483647522/

  4. #4
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    Make sure you know how to use a freewheel remover. There's very torque involved in removing freewheels, and it's easy to break the two driving dogs off the tool.

    To prevent mishap, use an axle nut to hold the remover securely to the freewheel so it can't jump out, then as soon as the freewheel breaks free, be sure to loosen or remove the axle nut so the threaded freewheel has room to move out. Otherwise, you'll destroy the axle or bearings, or both.

    Many freewheels are on so tight that you won't get them off with a wrench. The best way is to assemble the remover with the axle nut on as I described, put the remover in a vise, then grab the rim in both hands and twist to the left with all your strength. Again, stop once it breaks loose, and back off the axle nut.

    BTW- a freewheel remover should cost you less than $10.00, or you could bring the wheel to a bike shop and have it removed for $5.00 or so.
    FB
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  5. #5
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    what type of remover is it?

  6. #6
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    Removers are identified by the brand of freewheel they fit. Your's looks like a SunTour but check the freewheel itself.
    FB
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  7. #7
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    thanks guys its a suntour 2 prong remover

  8. #8
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    If you don't have a vise you can use the QR to hold the tool in place and hit the wrench with a hammer. Crude, but it works.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidad View Post
    If you don't have a vise you can use the QR to hold the tool in place and hit the wrench with a hammer. Crude, but it works.
    Bad advice. I hate to post corrections but frewheel removers are heattreated to a high hardness for maximum strength. Unfortunately this makes them somewhat brittle. There's a good chance that the prongs will fracture rather than drive the FW if you hammer on the wrench. A steady hard pull with a wrench that comes out as far as the rim for max. leverage, or the vice and turning the rim are the two ways to go.
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  10. #10
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    Yes, the prongs on the freewheel removers are very hard and delicate. Smashing the wrench with anything could snap the remover and gouge out parts of the freewheel, making removal impossible.

    Better to use steady and increasing pressure on the remover. Most of the time, clamping it in a vice would be fine, but I've had freewheels that were so tightly stuck that I've broken vices and bench-tops trying that. Easiest to use a longer lever than the rim (big wrench). And use your weight to apply the force. Aim the wheel so it spins into something stationary and step on the wrench:


  11. #11
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    I've had a freewheel tool just shatter into 30 little pieces. I was dumbfounded.

  12. #12
    Elitist Troglodyte DMF's Avatar
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    FIRST tool to use on that freewheel is a brush - with soap. There's so much crud on it you'd never be able to get a pin extractor to seat fully.
    Stupidity got us into this mess - why can't it get us out?

    - Will Rogers

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    Will i be able to replace this with a fixed sprocket and lockring ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by callumc_103 View Post
    Will i be able to replace this with a fixed sprocket and lockring ?
    No.

    Fixed gear hub / sprocket systems use the same thread for the sprocket, but have a stepped smaller reverse threaded lockring so reverse torque on the sprocket tends to tighten not loosen the lockring, so it's reliably kept in place.
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  15. #15
    Senior Member Homebrew01's Avatar
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    +1 to FB and Danno
    Why do you want to remove it ?

    Quote Originally Posted by DMF View Post
    FIRST tool to use on that freewheel is a brush - with soap. There's so much crud on it you'd never be able to get a pin extractor to seat fully.
    Pin extractor ? Are you suggesting disassembling the freewheel ?
    Last edited by Homebrew01; 10-28-10 at 07:59 PM.
    Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike

  16. #16
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    Will i be able to replace this with a fixed sprocket and lockring ?
    You can look at this, though I would recommend a new hub to go fixed

  17. #17
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    No.

    Fixed gear hub / sprocket systems use the same thread for the sprocket, but have a stepped smaller reverse threaded lockring so reverse torque on the sprocket tends to tighten not loosen the lockring, so it's reliably kept in place.
    Sheldon Brown disagrees

    Conventional Freewheel-type Hubs

    The cheapest way to convert a multi-speed bicycle into a fixed gear is to use the original rear hub, assuming that it is made for a conventional threaded freewheel. A fixed sprocket will thread right on, but there is no provision for a left threaded lock ring.

    If you go this route, it is a good idea to use LocTite or a similar thread adhesive. You can use an old lock ring from a British-threaded bottom bracket as an additional safety measure, it is the same thread.

    Although you can just screw on the sprocket and put everything together, the chain line will probably be incorrect. If you go this route, you will usually need to re-arrange spacers on the axle to correct the chain line, then re-dish the wheel so that everything will track correctly.

    I should mention that there are those who say you shouldn't use a lockring. This theory is based on the fact that if the chain should come off the chainwheel and get caught, a sprocket without a lockring will just unscrew, rather than locking up the rear wheel.

    My feeling is that it is better to use a lockring so that you can rely on being able to slow the bike down with your feet, especially if you ride with only one brake.
    If you don't use a proper track hub with a lockring, you really should have two hand brakes. If not, a front brake failure followed by a sudden extra effort at "resisting" could break the sprocket loose at the worst possible time, and you'd be toast!
    I've done this. It's not the optimal...a track hub is better... but it does work.
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  18. #18
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    Why would you suggest someone use an unreliable, non-optimal system? The purpose of a using a fixed gear is to be able to apply reverse torque to the rear wheel via the pedals. If that isn't the intention, then one is better off with a single speed freewheel and brakes.

    It is possible to use loctite to help retain a fixed rear sprocket, if no serious reverse torque is applied, but that somewhat defeats the purpose. The key word in the post was reliably, along with an explanation of the principle involved. So if one wants an unreliable, cheap alternative one is free to do so, but I will never advise it.

    BTW- it isn't a case of Murphy's Law but if one relies on loctite to hold a fixed sprocket, it is most likely to fail at the worst possible moment, when you're counting on the reverse torque to stop or control the bicycle. Even if you have a brake, the time and distance lost can become critical.

    IMO- only someone who's ignorant or foolish would set up a fixed wheel bike without a track style hub designed for it. Feel free to dis-agree it's only an opinion.
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  19. #19
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    Why would you suggest someone use an unreliable, non-optimal system? The purpose of a using a fixed gear is to be able to apply reverse torque to the rear wheel via the pedals. If that isn't the intention, then one is better off with a single speed freewheel and brakes.

    It is possible to use loctite to help retain a fixed rear sprocket, if no serious reverse torque is applied, but that somewhat defeats the purpose. The key word in the post was reliably, along with an explanation of the principle involved. So if one wants an unreliable, cheap alternative one is free to do so, but I will never advise it.

    BTW- it isn't a case of Murphy's Law but if one relies on loctite to hold a fixed sprocket, it is most likely to fail at the worst possible moment, when you're counting on the reverse torque to stop or control the bicycle. Even if you have a brake, the time and distance lost can become critical.

    IMO- only someone who's ignorant or foolish would set up a fixed wheel bike without a track style hub designed for it. Feel free to dis-agree it's only an opinion.
    Before flying off the handle, maybe you ought to read what was quoted. Particularly this part

    If you don't use a proper track hub with a lockring, you really should have two hand brakes. If not, a front brake failure followed by a sudden extra effort at "resisting" could break the sprocket loose at the worst possible time, and you'd be toast!
    Personally, I'd not ride any fixed gear without 2 hand brakes...even one with a track hub and lockring.

    You also said, flat out, that it couldn't be done. Sheldon Brown disagrees with you. I was pointing that out to you.
    Stuart Black
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