Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-20-10, 11:30 PM   #1
The Heckler
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Gluing tubulars

It's my first time doing this. I've seen a few videos, and they don't all do the same thing.

First was the Zipp video on youtube, where the guy uses 2-3 layers of glue on the rim (letting each dry for 24h), then 1 layer on the tire (letting that dry), then finally gluing the tire on with a final 5th layer of glue that has dried for about 5 min. And he waits like 2 days before riding.

Then there is some other guy that uses only 1 layer on the rim, 1 on the tire...letting those two dry completely, and then gluing it the 3rd time. 1 day to dry.

And finally, the instructions on my tubular glue that basically say: Clean rim. Apply thin coat and let dry for 5-20min. Mount tire and pump it up. Wait 12H before use.
The glue is Tubasti, it's French. This is the most extreme one

I think option #3 is not a good idea, but what about #2? I know #1 is definitely going to work...after a month.

My rim and tire have been glued previously, so there is some left on there. Do I still need to apply those extra coats on the rim and tire before doing the final gluing, or can I just put the glue on and mount the tire?

Last edited by The Heckler; 10-20-10 at 11:34 PM.
The Heckler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-10, 01:07 AM   #2
Greenfieldja
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Belgium
Bikes:
Posts: 993
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Tubasti glue...also known as elephant snot, is a thick and tenacious white glue. It works well but can be messy if you are not careful in its application.

If you are regluing previously glued rims you need to evaluate whether your rims need to be cleaned or can be reglued. It is ok to reglue if you are using the same type of glue and the glue residue on the rims is clean and fairly even coated.

If the glue is dirty, you are using a different type of glue, or not applied evenly you should consider cleaning the old glue off and starting fresh.

To clean the old glue off of aluminum rims I recommend acetone as it is available and highly effective. I do not know if acetone is safe for carbon fiber rims but others may chime in with a recommendation for carbon.

For gluing the tubulars...the tubasti directions are kind of scant but if you tried to apply the method from the first option you list you may find that to be too much glue. In any case, I would recommend 2-3 thin layers evenly spread on the rim allowing the glue to setup for a number of hours between coats. Then 2 thin, evenly spread layers on the tire as well. I apply the tire soon after applying the last layer on the rim so that the wet glue allows the tire to slide into place easily. This also will give you a short window to adjust the position of the tire so that it is centered all the way around. After it is centered pump it up hard and then wait 24hrs for the glue to set and cure for maximum bond.

If you are regluing previously glued rims then use a layer of fresh glue to reconstitute the old glue and then apply the glued tire as recommended above.

I like to use continental and vitoria glues as I find them easier to work with and get an thinner and more even spread.

I put a plastic bag over my hand and put a dab of glue between the spoke holes on the rim and then use a bag covered finger to spread the glue evenly on the rim between the spoke holes. Do one section at a time. It helps to mount the rim in a truing stand or in the frame suspended off the floor so you can rotate the wheel without it touching the floor or other potential vectors that may contaminate the glue.

Be sure to put a layer of glue on any spares you intend to carry as you dont glue spares on the road.

Also, stretch your tire by putting mounting it on the rim and pumping it up hard and then leave it for a few days. This will make the tire easier to mount once you have applied the glue.

Good luck.

-j
Greenfieldja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-10, 01:32 AM   #3
prathmann
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Bay Area, Calif.
Bikes:
Posts: 6,232
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 153 Post(s)
I don't really recommend it, but my practice during the year that I used tubulars was to just depend on the tackiness of the old glue. Bought the bike used and just wanted to use the tubulars until they wore out (then I replaced the rims). I did get a number of flats that I patched before I finally wore out the tire tread. Never added any glue and never had any problems even on fast winding descents. Lived in Tucson at the time where there tend to be lots of flats due to all the thorns and also plenty of mountain descents. I don't pretend to set any speed records, but I also wasn't holding up the group on our rides.

I'd expect any of the three options you give above to work ok.
prathmann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-10, 02:14 AM   #4
DannoXYZ 
Senior Member
 
DannoXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Saratoga, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 11,606
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
The procedure varies depending upon the type of glue. DO NOT use the wrong procedure for the type of glue you're using.
DannoXYZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-10, 05:20 AM   #5
Greenfieldja
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Belgium
Bikes:
Posts: 993
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
I agree with DannoXYZ on his statement above with the caveat that tubasti, continental, and vittoria glues will all work with the first two methods the OP had listed.

-j
Greenfieldja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-10, 07:33 AM   #6
Ex Pres
#39
 
Ex Pres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: the 35223 (AL)
Bikes:
Posts: 6,339
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
I use the plastic baggie on the finger method as well.
Stretch the tire first fully inflated on a rim at minimum overnight, preferably longer.
One coat on the rim.
One coat on the tire.
(If your first coat hasn't acheived the full coverage you want then do another)
I really don't see a need for a long dry - the solvent is 95% gone pretty quickly. 20 minutes is probably enough.
Fresh coat on the rim. Install the tire immediately.
Pump tire enough to check "true" of the tire on the rim. Adjust as necessary.
Fully inflate and leave to sit overnight.
Deflate, check for voids. Inflate. Ride.
Ex Pres is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-10, 09:16 AM   #7
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.
Posts: 16,790
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 223 Post(s)
Your 3 options all work, in decreasing level of security.

I've found the Tufo tape to work as well as glue, but much cleaner and much faster. You can ride the wheel immediately after mounting the tire.

Use the "regular" tape with Tufo's own tires. Use the "extreme" tape with other companies' tires.
JohnDThompson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-10, 10:28 AM   #8
Grand Bois
Senior Member
 
Grand Bois's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pinole, CA, USA
Bikes:
Posts: 16,838
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 139 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
Your 3 options all work, in decreasing level of security.

I've found the Tufo tape to work as well as glue, but much cleaner and much faster. You can ride the wheel immediately after mounting the tire.

Use the "regular" tape with Tufo's own tires. Use the "extreme" tape with other companies' tires.
+1

I don't think I'd use tubulars if I had to mess with glue.
Grand Bois is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-10, 02:11 PM   #9
EcoRacer
Member
 
EcoRacer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oslo, Norway
Bikes:
Posts: 47
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I Have glued 100+ tubulars in the last year using method 1 or 2 depending on the urgency, haven't had a single complaint yet. Method 3 i wouldn't recommend.
EcoRacer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-10, 03:11 PM   #10
Paul01
Senior Member
 
Paul01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Tampa Bay, Fl
Bikes: Vitus 979, KHS Montana Comp
Posts: 531
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Then there is some other guy that uses only 1 layer on the rim, 1 on the tire...letting those two dry completely, and then gluing it the 3rd time. 1 day to dry.

This works great for a new, or super clean aluminum rim. Next time you mount the tire, probably on the side of the road far from home,you can use the existing glue if its tacky to the touch.Remember: The more glue you use, the more often you will need to clean the rim back to bare metal.
Paul01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-10, 03:20 PM   #11
The Heckler
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 28
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greenfieldja View Post
Tubasti glue...also known as elephant snot, is a thick and tenacious white glue. It works well but can be messy if you are not careful in its application.

-j
I found out the hard way last night. I was reading about Tubasti and someone said to mix the glue inside the tube before doing it....and I broke it. It was needle-sized hole, but the stuff just kept coming out and I couldn't get it off my fingers. So now that I can't return it, i'm going to be another martyr in the fight with Tubasti
The Heckler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-10, 05:54 PM   #12
Chombi 
Senior Member
 
Chombi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Bikes: 1986 Alan Record Carbonio, 1985 Vitus Plus Carbone 7, 1984 Peugeot PSV, 1972 Line Seeker, 1986(est.) Medici Aerodynamic (Project), 1985(est.) Peugeot PY10FC
Posts: 10,949
Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
I use Continental glue in the small yellow tubes on my tubular wheels and just follow the instruction on the tube. The instructions only ask for something like 15 minutes between layers of glue on the rim and tires and I wait about 24 hours before riding the finished (fully inflated) wheels. No problem with this method so far, even with less than perfect rim bedding from my cheap, slightly lumpy base taped Vittoria Rally tires.
I think you should be OK as long as you follow the glue manufacturer's instructions.
BTW, pre-stretching the tires by mounting them inflated on the rims without glue really helps make final installation much easier.

Chombi
Chombi is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:51 AM.