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Old 11-12-10, 12:15 PM   #1
lgraba
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Replacing individual cogs on a casserre

I recently replaced my chain, but was hoping my cassette was still good for a while. Unfortunately, I get significant skipping on the 14, 15, and 16 tooth cogs, so they are worn out. I could just replace the whole cassette, but that seems like a waste money when 70% of the cogs are just fine. I've looked online to see if I can buy individual cogs, and found a couple of places that sell Miche Shimano Middle Position cogs in the right sizes.

Does anyone know if these can be used as drop-in replacements for cogs on an Ultegra 6600 cassette?
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Old 11-12-10, 12:56 PM   #2
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Most likely, the cog's timing would not be the same as Shimano's and the shifting would be poor. Miche cogs rarely get good reviews - you get what you pay for.
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Old 11-12-10, 01:14 PM   #3
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did you try loose screws? easily replacing indivual cogs was one the many marketing statements by shimano but 'spares' were never common. then they went from screwed to riveted cassettes. if you can find the correct ones there is no reason why can't replces just the worn ones
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Old 11-12-10, 01:47 PM   #4
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One place to get individual cogs is SJS Cycles. Their delivery times are often shorter than from US vendors. The general truth, however, is that the cheapest way of getting individual cogs is to buy a whole cassette...
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Old 11-12-10, 02:01 PM   #5
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did you try loose screws? easily replacing indivual cogs was one the many marketing statements by shimano but 'spares' were never common. then they went from screwed to riveted cassettes. if you can find the correct ones there is no reason why can't replces just the worn ones
Not quite sure what you are suggesting. Only the largest cogs are riveted, and they are not worn out. It is three of the smaller ones that are worn, and they just slip off. The only issue is to get replacement cogs that will work.
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Old 11-12-10, 02:06 PM   #6
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Not quite sure what you are suggesting.
Loose Screws is a vendor.
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Old 11-12-10, 02:15 PM   #7
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Loose Screws is a vendor.
Doh!! I sure misunderstood that.

I looked on Loose Screws. I saw nothing for newer 10-speed Shimano cassettes.
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Old 11-12-10, 04:44 PM   #8
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I'm pretty cheap, but I'd just replace the cassette. Even though not all of your cogs are skipping, it's likely that all of them are worn. Only replacing the really bad ones will just wear out your new chain (and therefore new sprockets) faster when you use the "old" gears. You'll be left with worn out parts sooner than if you just replaced the whole thing at once.
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Old 11-12-10, 07:57 PM   #9
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Even though not all of your cogs are skipping, it's likely that all of them are worn
Not true. Usually middle cogs wear out fastest, then the small cogs and finally large. The wear can be tested in a semi-quantitative manner with the Rohloff cog wear indicator. I put together cassettes out of individual cogs and when they wear out I change only those that I have to. The small cogs may survive 2 changes of the middle ones and the large cogs 3-4 changes of the latter.

Best though is to change the chain often, sparing in that way the cogs.
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Old 11-13-10, 08:15 AM   #10
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Which cogs wear out first depends on your exact gearing and the terrain that you ride. Riding in the Colorado mountains with a triple crank, my 19T always wore the most, followed by the 21T. Using a 28T or 30T chainring greatly increases the chain tension and increases cog wear, too. Ti cogs may last half as long as steel cogs, at best. I had severe wear on the 19 and 21 tooth Ti cogs of a Record cassette after only 4,000 miles. Never bought Ti cogs again.

Tossing chains too soon can cost far more than the extras use gained on the cogs. Rather than tossing chains frequently, try using 3-4 chains in a regular rotation. You can get more use from all of them and not have to worry about new-chain skip.
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Old 11-13-10, 09:19 AM   #11
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Which cogs wear out first depends on your exact gearing and the terrain that you ride.
Generally true. If you do not use a cog, it won't wear out.

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Using a 28T or 30T chainring greatly increases the chain tension and increases cog wear, too.

Generally wrong. For the same gear ratio, tension in the chain is lower for a larger chainring-cog combination than for a smaller. In addition, for the same gear ratio fewer teeth work in a smaller cog, accelerating the wear.

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Ti cogs may last half as long as steel cogs, at best. I had severe wear on the 19 and 21 tooth Ti cogs of a Record cassette after only 4,000 miles. Never bought Ti cogs again.
Sounds sensible. Ti is weaker material.

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Rather than tossing chains frequently, try using 3-4 chains in a regular rotation. You can get more use from all of them and not have to worry about new-chain skip.
Dubious. You want to toss a chain away once its overly stretched. For a stretched chain, few teeth on a cog begin to work and cog destruction progresses in an avalanche manner. With a sufficiently stretched chain, chainrings will get ruined too.
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Old 11-13-10, 09:32 AM   #12
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One place to get individual cogs is SJS Cycles. Their delivery times are often shorter than from US vendors. The general truth, however, is that the cheapest way of getting individual cogs is to buy a whole cassette...
Are the cogs a standard thickness between manufacturers?

For that matter, how about using cogs off a much cheaper 9 (or even 8) speed cassette with 10 speed spacers? Or are the cogs thicker or otherwise different? I understand the ramping isn't likely to match.
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Old 11-13-10, 10:27 AM   #13
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Some info on the cog and spacer thickness can be found on the Sheldon Brown's page. When the cogs and spacers are stacked together they do not align perfectly and the drivetrain can take moderate deviations and operate fine. Correspondingly you can usually toss in 2-3 cogs from another speed and shifting will work fine. This is true even though teeth may be shaped in subsequent cogs to work together. However, if you mix too much different speeds, you may need to work with spacers to get good shifting. Ultimately, there is a guy on Ebay who cuts custom spacer widths - just do the search for cassette spacers there.
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Old 11-13-10, 11:32 AM   #14
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Loose Screws is a vendor.
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Doh!! I sure misunderstood that.

I looked on Loose Screws. I saw nothing for newer 10-speed Shimano cassettes.
I was being a bit ambiguous but meant to attach a link to the site. I was not sure just where your cogs fell on the cassette so had no idea how they were or not attached
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Old 11-15-10, 08:12 AM   #15
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Thanks for the help, everyone. I'm coming to the conclusion that I will need to replace the cassette because it will be difficult to find individual cogs that will work well.

I do need to figure out how to make cassettes last longer, as I just replaced this one a year ago, along with the chain. Each had about 4200 miles on them. I probably left the chain on too long, so that after it became worn, it wore down the cassette as well. I was under the impression that you should only need to replace the cassette every other time you replace the chain. I probably should also use the big chain-ring more, since then I would use the larger cogs in back and have less wear there. I'm currently doing that on the worn cassette now.
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Old 11-15-10, 09:06 AM   #16
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Cross-chaining contributes to cog wear, doesn't it?
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Old 11-16-10, 10:21 AM   #17
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I do need to figure out how to make cassettes last longer, as I just replaced this one a year ago, along with the chain. Each had about 4200 miles on them. I probably left the chain on too long, so that after it became worn, it wore down the cassette as well. I was under the impression that you should only need to replace the cassette every other time you replace the chain. I probably should also use the big chain-ring more, since then I would use the larger cogs in back and have less wear there. I'm currently doing that on the worn cassette now.[/QUOTE]

Well, I seem to have to replace mine every 2 or 3 years. On the other hand, I never have to replace the one on my wife's bike (well, not in 10 years). As far as I can see, the significant difference is that she has a chainguard, which keeps all the rubbish off. I am going to fit one on my bike next time I do a refit.
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