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Old 12-03-10, 11:14 AM   #1
adlai
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Non-standard hexes

For protection of components, I'm considering using non-standard bolts. My park tool bike tool has a weird little screwdriver which can best be described as a six-sided Phillips.

Or something like that. basically the idea is to have it so that a common hex tool can't access the screw. Where to get?
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Old 12-03-10, 11:22 AM   #2
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adali, Might be a Torx head. These can be found at most tool outlets and come in different sizes.

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Old 12-03-10, 11:24 AM   #3
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yeah, it's a t25.

most tool stores?
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Old 12-03-10, 11:27 AM   #4
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buy a good set of them and be done.....you'll find many torx in automotive applications.
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Old 12-03-10, 11:29 AM   #5
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That's the Torx pattern. Your multi-tool likely has a T25 size, which fits the common bolts on disc brake rotors.

These rotor bolts have M5 threading ("M" sizes designate both thread pitch and diameter), which is a common bolt threading that can be used on many places on the bike, such as water bottle mounts.

The bike shop should have disc rotor bolts, but they're not very long. The hardware store might have longer M5s, and various diameters and pitches of bolts with a T25 head.
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Old 12-03-10, 11:49 AM   #6
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You can take it a step up and use security torx screws. That is a torx screw with a pin in it so a standard torx bit wont fit it.
I am not sure wher to get those retail, you need to find a REAL industrial hardware store. I know you can order the screws and tools on the internet but have to order full boxes and might be expensive
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Old 12-03-10, 01:14 PM   #7
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Check the yellow pages for a "fastener" store.
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Old 12-03-10, 04:11 PM   #8
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Search on "security screws and bolts" or "tamper-resistant screws and bolts" : finding them in metric sizes might be a challenge. Also, many of the vendors will not sell the specialized tools to the general public. Security Torx will probably be the easiest to get, for you (and for determined thieves.)
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Old 12-03-10, 04:19 PM   #9
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You can take it a step up and use security torx screws. That is a torx screw with a pin in it so a standard torx bit wont fit it.
I am not sure wher to get those retail, you need to find a REAL industrial hardware store. I know you can order the screws and tools on the internet but have to order full boxes and might be expensive

These screws are not too hard to find in SAE sizes but difficult at best in metric sizes.
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Old 12-03-10, 05:47 PM   #10
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security torx tools are available at sears
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Old 12-04-10, 08:24 AM   #11
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Security bits of various types are also available at Harbor Freight.
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Old 12-04-10, 02:15 PM   #12
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The bits are no trouble to find at all. The fasteners are widely available in SEA sizes only. Metric fasteners with these heads, on the other hand are rare or not available. That is the challenge.
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Old 12-04-10, 02:24 PM   #13
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And as you're finding the "security" torx and allen bits are not all that uncommon these days. So their "protection" value is greatly diminished. A recent all in one driver handle and bits kit I recently got has both the allen and torx bits already drilled out to fit over the security pins. This was a counter top cheapie promotional at the local autoparts store.

There are other more protective security screw heads available but most will not allow for decent torque loads or are one way only which makes it extremely hard to service your bike later on. And as mentioned getting them in metric can be a pain.
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Old 12-04-10, 03:43 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adlai View Post
Or something like that. basically the idea is to have it so that a common hex tool can't access the screw. Where to get?
Here's a selection of metric Torx-head bolts: http://www.mcmaster.com/#socket-cap-screws/=a073i8
Drill down to -> Socket Cap Screws -> Button Head -> Star/Torx

Kinda pricey and may end up costing you more than the components you're trying to protect. And as previously mentioned, a lot of over-the-countre tool-kits will have the proper Torx bits anyway.

Last edited by DannoXYZ; 12-04-10 at 03:49 PM.
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Old 12-04-10, 10:06 PM   #15
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One common method for securing hex bolts is buy epoxying a ball bearing into the recess. All you need to remove it is acetone. This will probably be cheaper and easier than other methods, and, really, how many thieves carry around acetone?

Cheers
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Old 12-04-10, 10:19 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DannoXYZ View Post
Here's a selection of metric Torx-head bolts: http://www.mcmaster.com/#socket-cap-screws/=a073i8
Drill down to -> Socket Cap Screws -> Button Head -> Star/Torx

Kinda pricey and may end up costing you more than the components you're trying to protect. And as previously mentioned, a lot of over-the-countre tool-kits will have the proper Torx bits anyway.
Right you are. Mcmaster has them but not in both Mitric threading as well as security torx. I think its a good idea - just hard to make work.
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Old 12-04-10, 11:42 PM   #17
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I've seen 5-sided Allen socket-cap screws. Anyone know where to get those?
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Old 12-04-10, 11:50 PM   #18
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I've seen 5-sided Allen socket-cap screws. Anyone know where to get those?
I've seen 5-sided spuds on the tops of fire hydrants...
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Old 12-05-10, 08:21 AM   #19
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One common method for securing hex bolts is buy epoxying a ball bearing into the recess. All you need to remove it is acetone. This will probably be cheaper and easier than other methods, and, really, how many thieves carry around acetone?

Cheers
I've done this and it is a total pain the ass to remove when the bearing sits flush inside the bolt. sometimes impossible without destroying the bolt. I dont recommend it. If you're going the route, I recommend aluminum foil + a drop of superglue on top instead of the ball bearing. much easier to dig out since the foil is easy to destroy, but still difficult / way too time consuming for thieves of opportunity.

I would go one step further and get small rare earth magnets and a larger magnet to remove the small ones.
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Old 12-05-10, 01:04 PM   #20
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There is a British company which is combining a use of the kind of socket
long used to reduce custom wheel theft on cars, [string theory loops?]
into miniature Titanium and other alloy fittings ..

It's in the CAD startup phase at this point, withe some prototypes.

http://atomic22.co.uk/infiniti3d.html
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