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  1. #1
    Dirt Bomb sknhgy's Avatar
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    Can I get my bike to fit me?

    I bought this bike and really like the fact that I can fold it for easy transportation.
    007..jpg
    It's a Montague bi-frame. Problem is, it is a bit too big for me. There is too much distance between the seat and the handlebars, and I've got the seat moved as far forward as it will go.
    The distance between the centerline of the steering tube and the centerline of the handlebars is roughly 3-1/2".
    The fit feels better if I sit all the way on the nose of the seat, but that won't work for long, for obvious reasons.
    Do they make seats that are able to move forward, or do they make really short stems? Maybe some type of swept back handlebar?
    Is there a way to go about making this bike fit me better?
    Handlebar and steering tube diameters are both 1".
    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Senior Member bikeman715's Avatar
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    You can go with a shorter stem reach like maybe 60 MM that would bring in the handlebar closer to you.The 60 MM stem is the shortest they go. You could also move the handlebars closer to you by rotating them in the stem.
    bikeman715

  3. #3
    Я люблю суп abarth's Avatar
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    You can get a zero offset seat post and a shorter stem. Running a shorter stem usually will lower your handle bar. You can try turning your seat post 180 degree so you can slide your saddle forward more.

  4. #4
    Real Men Ride Ordinaries fuzz2050's Avatar
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    changing the handlebars to something with more sweep will also help reduce the reach. Something like the Wald 867 could work in this case.

  5. #5
    17yrold in 64yrold body
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    Before you make a lot of changes, you should research "bike fit". Using a different seat post with no offset, or forward offset might get the reach right, BUT move you too far forward for efficient and comfortable pedaling. Shorter stems or swept back bars might get reach right, but I personally would want to KNOW the fit was right first.

    Usually, size frame is determined by leg length/inseam length, THEN you work on getting your position right on the bike. Seat height/fore-aft position, THEN bar height/reach. You may be able to make a slightly too-large frame work for you, but you may also have to compromise on comfort/efficiency in the process.

    This is just my opinion, but it seems to be shared by a lot of people who know bike fit a lot better than I do. Only YOU can decide what works for you.

  6. #6
    AEO
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    Quote Originally Posted by badamsjr View Post
    Before you make a lot of changes, you should research "bike fit". Using a different seat post with no offset, or forward offset might get the reach right, BUT move you too far forward for efficient and comfortable pedaling. Shorter stems or swept back bars might get reach right, but I personally would want to KNOW the fit was right first.

    Usually, size frame is determined by leg length/inseam length, THEN you work on getting your position right on the bike. Seat height/fore-aft position, THEN bar height/reach. You may be able to make a slightly too-large frame work for you, but you may also have to compromise on comfort/efficiency in the process.

    This is just my opinion, but it seems to be shared by a lot of people who know bike fit a lot better than I do. Only YOU can decide what works for you.
    yep. Adjust the saddle position first, then work on the front end.

    it's interesting to note, that the frame appears to have a VERY slack seat tube.
    Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
    http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm

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    Senior Member rekmeyata's Avatar
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    ++ on the seat post first. Then if your still not comfortable then find a shorter stem reach.

    Here's a web site that can help you to get your fit dialed in easier: http://www.mountain-bike-world.com/m...e-fitting.html

  8. #8
    Dirt Bomb sknhgy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AEO View Post
    yep. Adjust the saddle position first, then work on the front end.

    it's interesting to note, that the frame appears to have a VERY slack seat tube.
    What is a "slack" seat tube?

  9. #9
    Quirky Grifter LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sknhgy View Post
    What is a "slack" seat tube?
    That means that the seat tube's angle is relatively low. Hard to say from photos, but I'd guess 70 degrees, probably less. That angle puts the seat farther behind the pedals than on a steeper bike. This geometry was fairly common in early to mid 80s MTBs. This bike's probably newer than that but the makers were probably loathe to completely redesign their folder to keep up with frame trends.

    Like others have said

    Zero offset seatpost, or even one of those crazy forward bent Tri seatposts might help. You've a long ways to go before the saddle gets too close to the bottom bracket.

    Tilting the bars back a bit could yield another inch reduction in saddle to bar distance without getting too wacky up front.

    Short stems are nice, too. Might be able to fit a super short BMX stem in there.
    Last edited by LesterOfPuppets; 12-05-10 at 04:50 PM.
    1980ish Free Spirit Sunbird fixed * 1996 Mongoose IBOC Zero-G * 1997 KHS Comp * 1990-ish Scapin * Lemond Buenos Aires Triple

  10. #10
    AEO
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    Quote Originally Posted by sknhgy View Post
    What is a "slack" seat tube?
    the seat tube angle. An STA that's closer to 90deg, or perpendicular, is "aggressive". An STA that's more slanted is "slack".
    every 0.5deg change to the STA makes an approximate change of 1cm in saddle position relative to the bottom bracket.

    This video is for a road bike, so it won't directly translate to a MTB, but the terms are the same.
    Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
    http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm

  11. #11
    bike whisperer Kimmo's Avatar
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    $0 nasty fix - try rotating the seatpost half a turn and see if there's enough angle adjustment to get the seat level (probably not without modification).

    Proper fix - buy a bike in your size.

  12. #12
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    stem does look like a shorter substitute would help, and pull back bend handlebars.

    Have you considered a Proper Folding Bike?

    Or do you need a mountain bike that will sort of reduce in length.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post

    Proper fix - buy a bike in your size.
    +1

  14. #14
    Dirt Bomb sknhgy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post
    $0 nasty fix - try rotating the seatpost half a turn and see if there's enough angle adjustment to get the seat level (probably not without modification).

    Proper fix - buy a bike in your size.
    Rotating the seatpost didn't work.

    I would/will sell this bike if I can find another folder that I like for a reasonable price. New Montagues are kind of cashy. Got about $100 invested in this one.

    I ain't riding one of those little-wheeled folders that look like kiddy bikes, thank-you very much.

  15. #15
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Buy a plain type headless seatpost, put a saddle clip on it,
    you can put the saddle clip ahead of or behind the seat post.

    I like my Brompton, a fine, hand made, well engineered machine.

    you can sort out your insecurities over un-manly wheel sizes if you want.

    Dahon makes both types, they Licensed Richey breakaway design Patents
    to make a big wheel take apart, frame.

  16. #16
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    THey make stems much mu8ch shorter than yours. They are cheap and easy to change and I would get that first.

    Most bike fitting experts reccomend against adjusting the saddle position to compensate for handlebar reach problems - that is for adjusting leg-angle. This is why seatposts are usually not designed to put the saddle in front of the post... although with some creativity you can do whatever you want.

    Plenty of companies make bars with lots of 'sweep,' too, but your already have lots of sweep. Although getting bars with a little less rise might make them feel a little closer, and make the bike feel less 'big' in general.

    Also, small wheel folding bikes kick arse, but I have the opposite problem with them that you have with yours - they are too small

  17. #17
    Senior Member rekmeyata's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sknhgy View Post
    Rotating the seatpost didn't work.

    I would/will sell this bike if I can find another folder that I like for a reasonable price. New Montagues are kind of cashy. Got about $100 invested in this one.:
    How far off are you from a fit after the seat post rotation? As others have said you can get a 60mm stem and that may dial it in for you. Stems are not expensive, you have a $100 into it, another $30 is not that much. You could simulate a 60mm post by lying a piece of small diameter wood across the stem where 60mm would be, and then simulate holding it like a bar and see if brings the fit in better.

  18. #18
    Dirt Bomb sknhgy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    Buy a plain type headless seatpost, put a saddle clip on it,
    you can put the saddle clip ahead of or behind the seat post.

    I like my Brompton, a fine, hand made, well engineered machine.

    you can sort out your insecurities over un-manly wheel sizes if you want.

    Dahon makes both types, they Licensed Richey breakaway design Patents
    to make a big wheel take apart, frame.
    Your suggestion on the seat-post clip sounds promising.

    I have a question: If "unmanly sized" wheeled bikes are such good machines, why are normal bikes fitted with 26, 27, 29, 700, etc wheels?

    The seat post rotation didn't work because of the angle of the seat. I couldn't get the seat anywhere near level.
    Last edited by sknhgy; 12-07-10 at 08:42 PM.

  19. #19
    AEO
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    Quote Originally Posted by sknhgy View Post
    Your suggestion on the seat-post clip sounds promising.

    I have a question: If "unmanly sized" wheeled bikes are such good machines, why are normal bikes fitted with 26, 27, 29, 700, etc wheels?

    The seat post rotation didn't work because of the angle of the seat. I couldn't get the seat anywhere near level.
    700c, road standard size. UCI says so. Not a good wheel size for frames under 52cm as the shortest the top tube can be is 53.5 without making the geometry funny.

    650c, not a popular size, compared to 700c, but allows for slightly smaller frame size.

    29'er. good for taller riders, as the bikes get pretty large. offers better ability to roll over things, but all things considered, not a big difference compared to 26"

    26". actually quite a good size for just about everything, as the wheels can be built stronger and both fat and narrow tires can be had. There is a limitation to how small the bike can get, however, just like the 700c road bikes, because of clearance issues with fatter tires.

    24". youth size, but terry bikes uses this size for some of their bikes, to allow for proper geometry while not having front wheel overlap problems.

    20" only problem with this size is they're not as offroad capable as 26" and 29". It's not due to tire selection, as there are a lot to choose from, but 20" simply doesn't roll as well over rough terrain. Which is demonstrated by the 26" to 29" comparison.

    But, bigger wheels are only better if you're able to ride the larger bike.
    Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
    http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm

  20. #20
    Senior Member rekmeyata's Avatar
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    I think your so close to fit you don't realize it. And earlier poster recommended a zero offset seat post and a 60mm reach stem.

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