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Old 12-28-10, 05:55 PM   #1
cchristanis
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Boots rubbing on crank arms and getting ruined!?

Hi. i wasnt sure where to post this. I just bought a pair of lake mxz 302 boots and a set of Vp m324 pedals from ebay (generic comparable to shimano m324) for my bike. I have adjusted the cleats so the boots are as far out ward from the crank arms as possible. The boots were rubbing on the crankarms scuffing up the leather. I was thinking that its because the boots are a wide size. But my regular work boots did it also. I never used this cleat system before. I have always used look. What is the problem here? I'll follow up with any info that is needed. Thanks for any replies!
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Old 12-28-10, 07:39 PM   #2
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You're probably a bit pigeon toed, at least when you pedal. The additional bulk of the boot accentuates the problem. Have (or had) the same issue with my Lake and Answer boots in combination with Crank Bros pedals. I gradually corrected my foot position but still have the occasional rub.
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Old 12-28-10, 07:53 PM   #3
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could spread the Q with 'KneeSavers' they screw into the crank arm , then the pedal screws into them/
adds about 20mm side.

Wet Irish early Spring Bike tour, in insulated shoe covers , they helped make clearance..
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Old 12-31-10, 01:41 PM   #4
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I was just confused cause my look system never did it and I was wondering why . I might just get those kneesavers. Thanks
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Old 01-01-11, 07:07 PM   #5
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Are you rubbing at the heel or near the ball of the foot. If at the heel, you can try rotating the cleat slightly, but that can create knee problems. Some people benefit from wedges which roll the foot around a toe to heel axis, and this changes the cleat alignment. A knowledgeable firrler might be able to help you.

If it's rubbing nearer the toe, you need either a wider pedal (crank face to cleat center line) or, if possible, move the cleat inboard on your shoes.

I have wide feet also, and am careful about my pedal choices, plus used some creative grinding of the rectangular washers to allow my Look cleats to be mounted about another 2mm inboard. Even then my shoes keep the crank arm clean.
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Old 01-03-11, 07:55 PM   #6
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Im rubbing at the ball. I moved the cleats in all the way last week. That helped a lot but I still get an occasional rub. I would imagine wide feet can be an advantage also (for balance). Thanks a lot for responding. It's pretty cool that you're in NY and near the ocean. I hate living here. Im in Rochester. Wish i was down south (as far as possible).
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Old 01-04-11, 05:27 AM   #7
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screw the cranks.

the cleats should be set in a position that doesn't give you knee pains.
making your stance wider just to keep the cranks from getting scratched up is the wrong way to do it.
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Old 01-04-11, 10:36 AM   #8
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screw the cranks.

the cleats should be set in a position that doesn't give you knee pains.
making your stance wider just to keep the cranks from getting scratched up is the wrong way to do it.
I agree that it's critical that the OP doesn't set cleats in a way that injures his knees. But he has few options about widening his Q-factor. He has wide feet, whether he widens his pedals, uses a pedal adapter, or moves his cleats inboard (his foot outboard) so his shoe clears the crank the effect is the same.

If you have a better suggestion other than surgery to remove the offending area behind his big toe, I'm sure he'd like to hear it.
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Old 01-04-11, 10:42 AM   #9
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i called shimano and a couple Lbs's and neither were any help. Since they dont usually show the measurements (on specs)from the crank to the center of the cleat on pedals or any other measurements, how do you know without measuring yourself before you buy? The knees arent an issue if i cant try the position first. i only need a few mm's . the kneesavers that fietsbob mentioned were 20 mm minimum.
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Old 01-04-11, 10:50 AM   #10
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Since they dont usually show the measurements (on specs)from the crank to the center of the cleat on pedals or any other measurements, how do you know without measuring yourself before you buy?
You said it, you don't know without measuring. Bring a ruler to the shop and measure the cleat to crank distance of various pedals, and look for the one that has the most room.
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Old 01-04-11, 10:59 AM   #11
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I agree that it's critical that the OP doesn't set cleats in a way that injures his knees. But he has few options about widening his Q-factor. He has wide feet, whether he widens his pedals, uses a pedal adapter, or moves his cleats inboard (his foot outboard) so his shoe clears the crank the effect is the same.

If you have a better suggestion other than surgery to remove the offending area behind his big toe, I'm sure he'd like to hear it.
The best solution I can think of is using a narrower BB, as much as the frame allows, with the knee savers pedal spindle spacers.
Either that or use a different pedal system that sets out the feet wider to begin with.
Time ATAC and crank brothers are both wide. ATAC has adjustable width, CB does not, but CB comes with the wide spindles as stock.

Alternatively, if it's just a few mm needed, then use a washer on the pedal.
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Old 01-04-11, 11:07 AM   #12
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Moving the cleat inboard on the shoe (thereby moving the shoe outboard) is functionally identical to moving the pedal out. Note that I'm not speaking of rotating the cleat to bring the heel out, just a lateral shift maintaining correct alignment.

But your suggestion of adding a washer between the pedal and crank is a good one, and will get him another millimeter or two. Possibly between that and cleat shifting he can buy the added distance he needs, without major surgery to his foot, the bike, or his wallet.

To the OP. If you opt for the pedal washer, don't get carried away trying to get more than this method will safely afford you. Sacrificing good thread engagement for just that last bit of extra clearance may cost you a crank arm. (or worse)
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