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  1. #1
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    Kryptonite lock jamming up

    I bought one of the higher-end Kryptonite locks, and not doing my homework right this time, I looked at the reviews for it after getting it. There were reports of people have issue opening it after using it for a month of two. I'm now starting to experience this, where I need to slam it to open once the key is turned 180 degrees. I've noticed that the parts that slide in have started to rust. Would you recommend lubing these parts with something like WD40 or is there some other way to remedy this type of situation with a lock jamming? Thanks in advance.

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    better than wd-40 is something like 3 in 1 oil. wd-40 is a waterdipersant and for a more permant fix oil is better
    Jforman

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    Yes, WD40 is not really much of a lubricant, it gets rid of water. Since you're already having some difficulty with it, I'd try a bit of penetrating lube (e.g. PBBlaster). Once you've got it working reasonably smoothly, you might try something like Boeshield T9 to protect it (that leaves a thin waxy-type coating after its solvent evaporates and should help prevent new rusting).

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    Never use WD-40 on a lock. Don't use oil on a lock. Either might help for a short time, but will only gum up/collect dirt over time and make things even worse. Flush it out with alcohol to get any dirt out, then use a dry lubricant made for locks, such as Lock-Ease (an alcohol/graphite mix - the alcohol carries the graphite, then evaporates, leaving only dry graphite).

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    Senior Member bboy314's Avatar
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    I've found too that with kryptonite locks, putting some grease on the metal nubs that lock into the barrel helps a lot for some reason. . . not really sure why.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mike_s View Post
    Never use WD-40 on a lock. Don't use oil on a lock. Either might help for a short time, but will only gum up/collect dirt over time and make things even worse. Flush it out with alcohol to get any dirt out, then use a dry lubricant made for locks, such as Lock-Ease (an alcohol/graphite mix - the alcohol carries the graphite, then evaporates, leaving only dry graphite).
    This is bad advice more suited to the brass cylinder of a door lock than a U-lock out in the weather.

    First of all the internal mechanism is steel and vulnerable to rust, and secondly water will weep into a dry lock. If you use it in freezing conditions water will freeze and jam the lock.

    The goal is to provide a light lubrication of the mechanism and keep water out.

    You can achieve these objectives using a very light oil/paraffin/solvent product like LPS-1, Boeshield, Frame saver, WD-40, or a homebrew mix of about 1:6 light oil:mineral spirits.
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    That's interesting, 'cause I used a bit of WD-40 in my door lock at home, and it's been amazingly smooth to use ever since :-o

    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    This is bad advice more suited to the brass cylinder of a door lock than a U-lock out in the weather.

    First of all the internal mechanism is steel and vulnerable to rust, and secondly water will weep into a dry lock. If you use it in freezing conditions water will freeze and jam the lock.

    The goal is to provide a light lubrication of the mechanism and keep water out.

    You can achieve these objectives using a very light oil/paraffin/solvent product like LPS-1, Boeshield, Frame saver, WD-40, or a homebrew mix of about 1:6 light oil:mineral spirits.
    Hmm, I was told at the do-it-yourself bike shop to never use WD-40 on a bike lock, but what you've mentioned here makes some really good sense :-/

    BTW what about wet chain oil, would that work well? Those are the 2 things I already have (that and the WD-40), trying to see if I can avoid going out to get something to lube it with :-)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sashko View Post

    BTW what about wet chain oil, would that work well?
    Too much of a good thing. You only need a light film, mainly to prevent water from wicking into the crevices. Since you have chain oil and WD-40, open the the lock and put a drop or two of the chain oil on the steel sliding latch, and then spray on WD-40 to carry it in and spread it around. Then spray WD-40 into the key area. Dry off any excess and overspray and let the lock dry overnight.

    You'll need to do this every once in a while in the winter, but probably only once in the summer if that. Use the locks feel as your indicator that it needs a repeat treatment.
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  9. #9
    commuter TimeTravel_0's Avatar
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    +1 to lock ease
    normal lube can collect dust/debris and gum up the locking mechanism more than graphite.



    available at most hardware stores.

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    I have had good luck with the dry graphite lube for the same problem. Mine is a powder and came in a little tube.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    (...) Since you have chain oil and WD-40, open the the lock and put a drop or two of the chain oil on the steel sliding latch, and then spray on WD-40 to carry it in and spread it around. (...)
    Just to confirm: the sliding latch is the part that turns with the key and locks the two ends of U part of the lock, right?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sashko View Post
    Just to confirm: the sliding latch is the part that turns with the key and locks the two ends of U part of the lock, right?
    Yes, by the sliding latch I mean the part that you see slide back and forth when you turn the key without the U-bar. That's steel, and needs oil or grease as does the mechanism it slides in. The part where you put the key needs only the lightest of lubes like WD-40 or what they sell for car door cylinders.
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    Yes, regular chain lube is fine. That's what I use in my locks all through the wet Chicago winter, and it works fine. Don't overthink it. A drop in each shackle, a drop in the keyhole, repeat every few months or so when it feels a little sticky again.

  14. #14
    2_i
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    Quote Originally Posted by relyt View Post
    I have had good luck with the dry graphite lube for the same problem. Mine is a powder and came in a little tube.
    I strongly warn against using graphite in a bike lock. I managed to immobilize my locking mechanism completely with graphite and had to pour large amounts of light oil to get rid of it and get the lock operating again. Boeshield, on the other hand, works wells providing both lubrication and a level of protection against water.

  15. #15
    we be rollin' hybridbkrdr's Avatar
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    Would anyone try mineral oil?

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    K-Y Jelly?
    Astroglide?
    "I did not know that!" -- J. Carson

  17. #17
    Senior Member Tunnelrat81's Avatar
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    We're talking about two different things here. People hear 'lock' and immediately suggest graphite lube, but the OP isn't having a problem with the key cylinder at all. He clearly stated that he's having a hard time with the physical latching portion of the lock "once the key is (already) turned 180 degrees."

    If we were talking about the lock cylinder, I'd agree that WD40 and T-9 are a terrible idea (sorry for those who have hosed your home locks with the stuff already, your clock is ticking) Silicone lubricants can work well, and are even sold by high profile lock manufacturers in their own blends (see Assa Abloy lasspray [lockspray]). In very special cases where the mechanism requires it, manufacturers provide their own (possibly oil based?) lubes. Example of this would be the Medeco lock spray. This is a special case, and I wouldn't recommend using it for any standard pin tumbler lock.

    To clarify for those confused, it sounds like we're dealing with a "latch" problem. In this case, some grease would be absolutely appropriate, and necessary. If the parts are hard to reach, you could try some white lithium grease in a spray. If you have good access, then some heavier duty grease might be better, and last longer before needing service again. But do be careful to keep it away from the actual key cylinder. Right now your key is turning reliably, and you don't want to mess with that.

    -Jeremy

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    It would almost seem like the metal parts of the U part of the lock that the latch typically logs against are the parts getting stuck. They have gotten rusty rather quickly. Would it not work best to simply lube those parts with something like chain oil or would that be a bad idea?

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    Senior Member Tunnelrat81's Avatar
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    I would say grease over chain oil simply for it's persistence. Oil won't last nearly as long as grease. It'll probably work fine, you'll just have to re-apply far more often.

    -Jeremy

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    K, I appreciate the advice :-)

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