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Old 01-10-11, 10:50 PM   #1
twobadfish
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Keep the bike or send it back?

I have this bike:





With a standover height of about 32.5". My inseam is 31" but with shoes on I fit over the top tube just fine.

I want to be able to take it off the road when I want but I also would like to do road cycling over long distances. I did a 44mi ride with a 2000' climb and my only complaint is that it seems slightly wobbly (not sure why).

Any ideas? Could the low seatpost position be causing balance problems?
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Old 01-10-11, 11:07 PM   #2
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Tires are dirty, time to get a new bike!

Seriously, that stand over sounds way too high, for you. You should look into a bike that fits you better.
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Old 01-10-11, 11:13 PM   #3
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If the seat is the right height (leg almost straight with heel on the pedal at the bottom) then the frame is too tall for you, especially for off road use where you went PLENTY of top tube clearance.

But I don't know what your options are at this point. I think that though it's less than ideally sized, you can make a decent road/commuter out of it by switching the tires. I'd be very leery of doing any off road riding on anything the least bit technical with that little top tube clearance.
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Old 01-10-11, 11:39 PM   #4
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Seat height should be more like this:
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Old 01-11-11, 12:03 AM   #5
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Yeah that's the feeling I've been getting (too large, seatpost too low)... I really like how the bike looks though and my size in the 2010 model will forever be unavailable. So I'm starting to consider a cyclocross bike so I can be better on hills and still go offroad.

Something like this

http://www.performancebike.com/bikes..._1081576_-1___

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Old 01-11-11, 12:11 AM   #6
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57cm
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Old 01-11-11, 01:52 AM   #7
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Yep, looks way to big for you
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Old 01-11-11, 03:32 AM   #8
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For that type of terrain you want more standover clearance than "just fine".
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Old 01-11-11, 07:38 AM   #9
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twobadfish, I don't think a CX bike is going to work too well in that type of terrain. I'd change tires on the GT to a road style and buy a correctly sized dedicated mountain bike. While I ride a 58 cm road frame, I ride an 18" mountain bike, if that's any help.

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Old 01-11-11, 07:52 AM   #10
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+1 on the bike being too big for you, particularly for any type of off road use. I also agree that a cyclocross bike will be a bit out of it's element in the terrain you show. Convert the GT into a dedicated road bike and get a suitable real MTB for your off road riding.
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Old 01-11-11, 08:21 AM   #11
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I'd look for a disc braked CX bike while I was at it, if I was you. If you like getting muddy on a regular basis it's a worthwhile investment, w/o any significant drawbacks outside a race setting.
You can get so-called 29er wheels as well as wheels intended for hybrid/commuter bikes fairly cheap these days, which opens up the possibility of keeping separate wheelsets for road and off-road, with quick and easy changes between them.
Regarding the wobble: assuming you're about normally proportioned WRT torso vs leg length, and that you have a decent saddle height - That'd put you in a more-than-average stretched out position, which certainly can contribute to such a feeling. IMO long stems in particular take some getting used to.

If you decide to keep this bike you might want to look for an extra short DH/BMX stem to bring the bar closer.
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Old 01-11-11, 09:11 AM   #12
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+10 Way too big.

+1 I ride a 56cm road bike (22 inch) and an 18 inch MTB.
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Old 01-11-11, 10:40 AM   #13
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There's no debate, the frame is way too big.

But I'm curious to the 2nd part of the OPs question. "keep this bike, or send it back?"

Back to where? The OP bought the wrong size and road it at least 44 miles. I don't know of any seller that would accept it back at this point. Am I missing something?
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Old 01-11-11, 01:00 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
There's no debate, the frame is way too big.

But I'm curious to the 2nd part of the OPs question. "keep this bike, or send it back?"

Back to where? The OP bought the wrong size and road it at least 44 miles. I don't know of any seller that would accept it back at this point. Am I missing something?
I got it from Performance Bike.

My biggest concern with the frame size is the balance issue. It just doesn't seem to coast very well and it's very difficult to stay in a straight line at slower speeds. I just don't know if it's due to the frame size or the bike itself.
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Old 01-11-11, 01:10 PM   #15
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The balance issue is definitely not connected to the size issue. There may be an alignment problem with the frame, or even somethingm as simple as a loose headset, or it might just be you.

If there's a mechanical problem, I'd expect the shop to correct it, but I'd be surprised if they took it back after you've ridden it a while simply because it's too big for you. It's possible and something you should take up with them, especially if they fitted you in the store and suggested this size, but if you picked the size on your own you may be out of luck as far as returning it.
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Old 01-11-11, 01:13 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
The balance issue is definitely not connected to the size issue. There may be an alignment problem with the frame, or even somethingm as simple as a loose headset, or it might just be you.

If there's a mechanical problem, I'd expect the shop to correct it, but I'd be surprised if they took it back after you've ridden it a while simply because it's too big for you. It's possible and something you should take up with them, especially if they fitted you in the store and suggested this size, but if you picked the size on your own you may be out of luck as far as returning it.
Performance has a no questions asked return policy.
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Old 01-12-11, 03:06 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by twobadfish View Post
... It just doesn't seem to coast very well ....
Meaning what? it slows down fast? unstable when off power?

Quote:
Originally Posted by twobadfish View Post
..it's very difficult to stay in a straight line at slower speeds.
There are wobbles and there are wobbles. Personally I usually don't like the feel of (too) long stems. Isn't exactly a wobble, but IMO it can make the bike feel nervous.
I don't have a problem riding those bikes, it just means that I have to concentrate more. If I don't, it feels like the bike is squirming under me.

Then there are those bikes that will actively try to get away from you. Often associated with riding with panniers, more rarely with alignment issues.
OTOH it looks like you've got a decent stroke in that sus fork, which probably means that the bike has a fairly slack head tube angle.
This means that depending on which type of bike you use as a reference, this one might feel quite a bit differently. Shouldn't be outright bad though.
If it's a bike bought new you really shouldn't be having that sort of troubles.
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Old 01-12-11, 09:26 AM   #18
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Take it back and get one that fits. Simple. (well, it SOUNDS simple ;-) )
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Old 01-12-11, 09:33 AM   #19
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Take it back and get one that fits. Simple. (well, it SOUNDS simple ;-) )
Agree but I wonder did a Performance retail shop knowingly sell him a bike that was much too big or did the OP order it from their web site and the Performance people neve know what size he really needed? I.e. who made the original mistake?
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Old 01-12-11, 08:43 PM   #20
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Agree but I wonder did a Performance retail shop knowingly sell him a bike that was much too big or did the OP order it from their web site and the Performance people neve know what size he really needed? I.e. who made the original mistake?
It was my mistake.
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Old 01-12-11, 09:24 PM   #21
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Poor coasting is likely caused by a tight brake pad, all it takes is a hair off. Turn the bike over and spin both wheels hard. Should spin for 3 minutes. Check the one that stops first. Those bars look hard to get used to. Maybe you are reaching too far.
I had a no hands wobble caused by not quite true and too loose bearings.

New bikes tend to be a bit tight also.

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