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  1. #1
    Senior Member amckimmey's Avatar
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    Aligning Kool Stop MTB Pads, HELP.



    Yesterday I bought some new brake pads. I had the shop put the pads on for me. Because I don't really know how to align the pads correctly my self. When I got home(I took it home in my van, not ride it home) that night I noticed that both the brakes on the non-drive side of the bike looked as if they had not been adjusted at all. Like they were just put on and nothing more. I was upset to see this, and spent most of this evening attempting to adjust them myself so I can ride to class and work tomorrow without worrying. I can't take it back to the shop that easy, its 50miles away. And I dont want to wear them wrong if I dont set them up right.

    I need help adjusting the pads.
    I have read as much in the BBB-2, and other places. These pads are weird because they have the lip at the end, and I don't know weather to count that as the toeing or not. I can't seem the find a great video on it. or anything actually talking about how to adjust the Kool stop pads.

    I could use any help, Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member shouldberiding's Avatar
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    What do you mean by, "looked as if they had not been adjusted at all,"?

  3. #3
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    OK it's super easy. You'll need a short length of string, or a patient friend. The little wedge at the end is there to provide toe in when you set them up and quickly wear off. Some people don't like it and file it off, and use a piece of 1/32" thick cardboard as a toe in guide.

    Set the shoes into the slot with the curve following the rim and the long end toward the back of the bike. Line up the shoes roughly and gently apply the brake and wind the string around the lever and handlebar to keep them on. You want them still loose enough that you can maneuver the shoes. Position the shoe exactly where you want on the rim, being sure that ti doesn't overhang where it might rub the tire. Jiggle it a bit to make sure the washers are settled home and hold it while you tighten.

    Repeat on the other shoe, then release the brake and check your work. Lastly adjust the cable adjuster so the lever throw is how you prefer it and spin the wheel to make sure both sides don't rub.

    You're all set, but don't be surprised by some brake squeal. It usually goes away after a little while, so instead of going crazy give it a chance to clear up on its own.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member amckimmey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shouldberiding View Post
    What do you mean by, "looked as if they had not been adjusted at all,"?
    one was siting so it would be almost 2mm off the rim, and the other one was angled as far as it could be not even siting. like they just put them there, tightened them, then forgot to adjust them or didnt double check

  5. #5
    Senior Member amckimmey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    OK it's super easy. You'll need a short length of string, or a patient friend. The little wedge at the end is there to provide toe in when you set them up and quickly wear off. Some people don't like it and file it off, and use a piece of 1/32" thick cardboard as a toe in guide.

    Set the shoes into the slot with the curve following the rim and the long end toward the back of the bike. Line up the shoes roughly and gently apply the brake and wind the string around the lever and handlebar to keep them on. You want them still loose enough that you can maneuver the shoes. Position the shoe exactly where you want on the rim, being sure that ti doesn't overhang where it might rub the tire. Jiggle it a bit to make sure the washers are settled home and hold it while you tighten.

    Repeat on the other shoe, then release the brake and check your work. Lastly adjust the cable adjuster so the lever throw is how you prefer it and spin the wheel to make sure both sides don't rub.

    You're all set, but don't be surprised by some brake squeal. It usually goes away after a little while, so instead of going crazy give it a chance to clear up on its own.
    Thank you very much, this has already helped me out. I will try it out how you say.

  6. #6
    Subjectively Insane MilitantPotato's Avatar
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    I'll repeat the most important part:
    Make absolutely sure the pads do NOT rub the tire when they're released or applied! They will quickly cut through the tire if they rub.

    Another tip, as you're tightening the bolt, use your other hand to keep the pad from rotating, if you've clamped the brake lever fairly well it won't rotate as easily.
    You've got a bike, so you gotta move.

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