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Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

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Old 03-10-11, 12:18 PM   #1
effortDee
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My Bicycle Toolkit or lack thereof PICS



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v1...DSCF0011-1.jpg

Hammer
pliers
adjustable wrench
chain tool
crank puller
cassette whip
I think thats a bottom bracket tool[in the plastic]
scissors
stanley knife
allan keys
grease
pumps


Here is my toolkit, not the full one as I have access to many other tools, sanders, multi tools like dremmel etc but anyway.

I have managed to take a part a few bikes and get to just the frame but never the wheels and a few other things. I know im missing a spoke key, but what else would i be missing?

I have a Raleigh Racer from the 80s and want to start taking it a part when i finish refurbishing an 80's Saracen Alu framed mountain bike and get it on the road so im not left without a bike.

Also, lets see yours

Last edited by effortDee; 03-10-11 at 12:27 PM.
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Old 03-10-11, 02:02 PM   #2
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One thing that jumps out is a socket for removing the cassette. A pedal wrench would also be helpful. A few cone wrenches, the sizes you need for you wheel cones.

http://www.parktool.com/product/dera...gnment-gauge-1 this tool is a must if your a mountain biker.
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Old 03-10-11, 07:32 PM   #3
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I have a cassette removal tool but forgot to add it to my box. That Park Tool looks like a good buy. Never seen them before!

Maybe could do with allan keys which are connected, the spoke tool and also spanners.

Cheers for reminding me about the cassette tool.
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Old 03-10-11, 07:41 PM   #4
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IMO the smartest way to approach tools isn't to try to amass any kind of complete kit, but to acquire tools as the need for them arises. That ensures that you'll never waste money on tools you don't use. Also the needs of professional and non-professional mechanics can be very different.

Consider freewheel removers. The pro needs a decent assortment because he never knows what may walk in the door, but the non-pro only needs the remover to fit his own bike, or maybe none at all if he doesn't own any freewheel bikes.

BTW- my only practical suggestion based on the photo, is to keep an oil finish on your tools, or a packet of silica gel in the toolbox to prevent dampness and rust.
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Old 03-10-11, 09:18 PM   #5
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I don't see any lubes such as Triflow or Boeshield. Also, what are the 2 hammers for?
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Old 03-10-11, 09:46 PM   #6
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Are those allen keys rusted???? Get new ones!!! And get a few types of lubes(grease,chain lube, etc.)
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Old 03-10-11, 11:40 PM   #7
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I see two hammers. You're more then well equipped to deal with any problems....

I'd oil and steel wool those allen wrenches clean of rust and perhaps add a container of oil to go with the grease. And then any more bicycle specialty tools to deal with your rides that may come up in the future.
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Old 03-11-11, 03:18 AM   #8
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http://bicycletutor.com/basic-tools/

http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help

Last edited by mtnclimber; 03-11-11 at 03:19 AM. Reason: more info
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Old 03-11-11, 05:03 AM   #9
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For what you have -

Get rid of the hammers, have never needed to use a metal headed one on a bike in 15 years, get a rubber mallet, and a Nylon headed hammer, these have the same effect, but will do much less damage; go to Cromwell Tools, and get a Thor Branded dual head one.

New allen keys + an 8mm key, which aren't corroded; for ones which are connected, if you mean on a ring at the end, don't bother, if as a multi-tool, good, but for home use, no more useful than individual, except that they are all together.

A cheap track pump will be a lot better that the pump you currently have for home use, saving a lot of time

A work stand is useful too, next time Edinburgh Bike have a sale, check their's out.

If you are re-furbing 80's and 90's bikes, the Bottom Bracket tool you have will be of no use, as this is for Hollowtech 2 BB's, you will need a tool specific to the type of BB you are removing, check out the Park Tools web site for which one, then CRC, Merlin or Woolly Hat shop are among the many UK suppliers for bike parts & tools.

For spare parts, you are probably limited to E-bay, as not many shops (if any) will keep any NOS parts from 20 years ago, check out Retrobike when you know what you need, but if these are low end bikes, it will probably works out very quickly, cheaper to buy a new bike (see Pauls Cycles for good value last years stock), or complete (2nd hand) replacements from ebay
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Old 03-14-11, 06:45 AM   #10
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This is good news! A few of the things you have mentioned I have surplus of.

Hammers I can replace with atleast one rubber mallet as I go camping alot and have two in total. I have copper grease for the aluminium to steel contact but no others, will get on that.

I have a very expensive pump with pressure gauge which stands up, unlike the ones i pictured.

Will look at sizing of the Saracen and Dawes BB sizing to see which way to go.

Thankyou for your insight!

Ill make sure future tools don't rust!
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Old 03-14-11, 07:53 PM   #11
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I've found that you can never have a kit and assume it has everything you need. For those who said to get rid of the hammers I would disagree. I bought an 80's Peugeot and the bottom bracket was trash. The threads were plastic and frozen so there was no way to get them out by turning them. I ended up having to buy a torch and heat the BB to melt the plastic and beat it out the other side. Sometimes you have beat on things and a good ole fashioned hammer is the best way to get the job done.
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Old 03-15-11, 04:52 AM   #12
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I see two hammers. You're more then well equipped to deal with any problems....



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Old 03-15-11, 06:47 AM   #13
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Get a set of metric wrenches. At least a 15mm for pedals.
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Old 03-16-11, 01:17 AM   #14
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To a man with a hammer, every problems appears as a nail.
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Old 03-16-11, 04:39 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
IMO the smartest way to approach tools isn't to try to amass any kind of complete kit, but to acquire tools as the need for them arises. That ensures that you'll never waste money on tools you don't use. Also the needs of professional and non-professional mechanics can be very different.

Consider freewheel removers. The pro needs a decent assortment because he never knows what may walk in the door, but the non-pro only needs the remover to fit his own bike, or maybe none at all if he doesn't own any freewheel bikes.

BTW- my only practical suggestion based on the photo, is to keep an oil finish on your tools, or a packet of silica gel in the toolbox to prevent dampness and rust.
All of this. Great post.

I've acquired all kinds of odd tools over the last few years as I've needed them. For example, a Park Tool chainring nut wrench for my slightly odd dropout arrangement. Five years ago, there's no way I'd have considered buying one because the need had never arisen. Now that I have one, it's there for if I need it again, either for the dropout swap job or for chainring replacement.

For me, it's about riding and enjoying the bike and then buying bits to help me do that when I need to.
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