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Old 03-24-11, 09:47 PM   #1
banditgrrr
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Moving components from Specialized to Kuota

I currently have a 2007 Specialized Allez Comp with all 105 components. I bought the bike only to find out that I shouldn't really be on a 56cm, I need more like a 58cm. I found a 58cm Kuota Kharma Frame/Fork set on Ebay that's an XL (58cm). My question is.....would everything be able to be moved from my Specialized to the Kuota without having to buy a bunch of new equipment?

If this is possible, what would I expect to pay a local shop to move everything over?

Any feedback is greatly appreciated.
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Old 03-24-11, 09:58 PM   #2
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Pics and then you'll get some answers. Googling bike specs can be a chore.
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Old 03-24-11, 10:10 PM   #3
banditgrrr
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Sorry. Here's a pic of each bike. I found the specs for my Specialized but can't find much on the Kuota Kharma. Hope this helps.

Kuota:
frame
Monocoque Carbon
Fork
Kuota Carbon 1 1/8"
Headset
INOX Bearing integrated headset 1 1/8"/div> Seatpost
Kuota carbon - 27.2mm<
Front Derailleur
35.0mm Clamp-On Required
BB Type
68mm / English
Frame Weight (appr.)
1150 grams



My Specialized Allez:
FRAME
Specialized E5, fully manipulated E5 SLX tubing, compact race design, FACT carbon seatstays w/ Zertz inserts

REAR SHOCK
N/A

FORK
Specialized FACT carbon steerer and fork legs w/ Zertz inserts

HEADSET
Specialized Mindset Plus, 1 1/8" integrated threadless, cartridge sealed bearings, alloy 20mm cone w/ one 10mm and two 5mm alloy spacers

STEM
Specialized Comp-Set, 3D forged alloy, 4-bolt 31.8mm bar clamp, 4- position adjustable

HANDLEBARS
Specialized Expert, 6061 alloy, short-reach drop, ergonomic top shaping, 31.8mm

TAPE / GRIPS
Body Geometry Bar Phat, cork ribbon w/ 2.5mm gel padding

FRONT BRAKE
Ultralight dual pivot brakes, Teflon pivots, forged 7050 alloy w/ cartridge pads

REAR BRAKE
Ultralight dual pivot brakes, Teflon pivots, forged 7050 alloy w/ cartridge pads

BRAKE LEVERS
Shimano 105, 10-speed STI, flight deck compatible

FRONT DERAILLEUR
Shimano 105, 10-speed, 31.8mm clamp, bottom pull

REAR DERAILLEUR
Shimano 105, 10-speed, short cage

SHIFT LEVERS
Shimano 105, 10-speed STI, flight deck compatible

CASSETTE / FREEWHEEL
Shimano 105, 10-speed 12-27t

CHAIN
Shimano 105, 10-speed

CRANKSET
Shimano 105, Hollowtech II 2-piece crankset

CHAINRINGS
52x39T

BOTTOM BRACKET
Shimano 105, Hollowtech II

PEDALS
Composite body test ride pedals

RIMS
Mavic Aksium




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Old 03-24-11, 10:21 PM   #4
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The problem I see is the front derailleur mount. The Allez uses a clamp while the Kuota has a tab. You'll need a new front derailleur. The Allez does use a 27.2mm seat post as well as English-threaded bottom bracket bearings, so you're safe there. You'll most likely need new cables and housings.

I'd venture that a shop would charge around $80-120, plus parts, to do the changeover.

Last edited by oldbobcat; 03-24-11 at 10:32 PM. Reason: Saw the photos
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Old 03-25-11, 01:47 AM   #5
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Add the headset, but the Kuota should come with one?

Were you not able to play around with the stem length on the Specalized? as 2 cm is not a huge size difference, and depending on manufacture can be the same size.
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Old 03-25-11, 10:32 AM   #6
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Be very cautious chosing a frame based on the 'number' of the size... different companies measure their frames differently.

I looked up the specs on the two bikes...

http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...007&spid=21894
http://www.kuota.it/bike.php?IDCateg...lore=1#Sector3

There is vertually no difference betwen what Specialized calls a 56 and what Kuota calls a 58 or XL.
Specialized TT: 565mm
Kuota TT: 570mm (5mm difference - about half the width of a ballpoint pen and can be easily accomodated with a change in stem)
Specialized Head tube length: 180mm
Kuota head tube length: 180mm
Specialized seat/head tube angles: 73.25/73
Kuota seat/head tube agles 73/73 (0.25 degrees of seat tube angle can be accomodated by adjusting the saddle fore/aft position on the post)

The only measurement that is substantially different is the seat tube length... 52 cm c-t on the specialized and 58 cm c-t on the kuota... which is adjustable by raising or lowering the seat post, or if your post is at the max height, buy a longer post. Unless you need the seat higher than it will go with commercially available seat posts, you are wasting a ton of money and effort for no apparent benifit.

The bottom line is: if the specialized is too small then the XL kuota is also too small.
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Old 03-25-11, 07:59 PM   #7
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I would highly recommend that the OP verify that the Kuota is the right size before going any further. Sizing is completely different from brand to brand and even models of the same brand.

Talk to a knowledgeable shop or fitter.
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Old 03-26-11, 03:14 AM   #8
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I would highly recommend that the OP verify that the Kuota is the right size before going any further. Sizing is completely different from brand to brand and even models of the same brand.

Talk to a knowledgeable shop or fitter.
That's what I think too - if it doesn't fit it isn't a good deal regardless of price.

I'm also thinking that $80 - $100 is pretty optimistic. I'm thinking twice that might be more like it.
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Old 03-26-11, 08:59 AM   #9
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I'll second the estimate of $80-120. A buddy of mine was looking for the same sort of quote last summer and the bike shops that he asked around here were all right around $100. So I told him to bring $50 in food/beer over and we'd do it together.
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Old 03-26-11, 01:44 PM   #10
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Could be cheaper if you start taking off parts by yourself. You should be able to do everything except the BB and headset (if the Kutoa doesn't come with one). Also, the shell on the Kuota may have to be faced.

but... I agree with the responses above to make sure it fits. TT length is more important than ST/standover.
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Old 03-28-11, 09:36 AM   #11
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Thank you all for your input. I decided not to buy the Kuota based on all the feedback I received. I took your advice and went to a LBS and told them what I was trying to do. There is no way I can afford to purchase a new bike so it seems like Ebay or Craigslist is my best option. When I told them this, they seemed to lose all interest in helping me. That seemed strange because I would still want to take my new bike to them for a fitting, buy products, etc. They would still get my business, it just wouldn't be $2000 on a new bike.

With that being said, and their lack of help, I have turned to an "online bike calculator" to try and get an idea of the correct size for me. I'm 6'1", 34" inseam, and 160 pounds. From what I could find, I would fall between a 59-61cm. Now if all the manufacturers are different in sizing, I'm assuming I would be good on a 60cm and then just have a professional fitting done to dial it in.

I've only been riding about 2 months and I can't afford to make another mistake by purchasing the incorrect size again. All of your feedback and advice is greatly appreciated.
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Old 03-28-11, 10:14 AM   #12
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I think you need to find a new LBS, but telling them about ebay / craigslist won't have helped much.

for sizing, have a look at the Salsa Cycles site, they have a fit chart, I wasn't covinced with this, but trused them, when I bought one of their frames, and it fits perfectly.

For buying a frame vs bike, unless you can get a good deal on a frame, normally it is much cheaper to buy a complete bike, as the only frames avaliable are high end in bike stores unless you go the direct / on-line way.

I'm not too familiar with the avalability of frames in the US (take it that's where your from), but one company who do frames I am familiar with is Planet X, who have a US operation and produce good products, http://www.planet-x-usa.com/c5/Frames.aspx think these are the type of frame / frames set you would be looking at if you can't find one 2nd hand
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Old 03-28-11, 10:26 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by banditgrrr View Post
Thank you all for your input. I decided not to buy the Kuota based on all the feedback I received. I took your advice and went to a LBS and told them what I was trying to do. There is no way I can afford to purchase a new bike so it seems like Ebay or Craigslist is my best option. When I told them this, they seemed to lose all interest in helping me. That seemed strange because I would still want to take my new bike to them for a fitting, buy products, etc. They would still get my business, it just wouldn't be $2000 on a new bike.

With that being said, and their lack of help, I have turned to an "online bike calculator" to try and get an idea of the correct size for me. I'm 6'1", 34" inseam, and 160 pounds. From what I could find, I would fall between a 59-61cm. Now if all the manufacturers are different in sizing, I'm assuming I would be good on a 60cm and then just have a professional fitting done to dial it in.

I've only been riding about 2 months and I can't afford to make another mistake by purchasing the incorrect size again. All of your feedback and advice is greatly appreciated.
Unless you've built good rapport with them, I can see why they would lose interest. Not trying to be rude, but it's just the way a lot of LBS so business.

I still think you should try not to think of bikes in terms of frame sizes. I would go test ride a bunch of bikes and note the geometry of all of them, then make a decision based off of that. Who knows, you may change your mind about buying from an LBS.
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Old 03-28-11, 02:19 PM   #14
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You should not start from square 1 and get a whole new bike... you should see if what you have can be adapted to work, ind if not, why not. For instance, if you think you need a bigger bike, why? Do you feel to 'cramped' (reach to handlebars too short)? Are you too hunched over (bars too low)? Or are you unable to get proper leg extension? All of these things can be handled with simple swaps of parts... instead of a new bike or frame, you could try a longer or higher stem or seatpost... you'd be amazed at what an extra centimeter can do to the fit of a bike.

Also consider getting a proffessional fitting done by a shop with a good reputation. They will give you suggested top-tube, stem, and seat tube lengths that you can then compare to your existing bike to see if modifications are possible, or if you should still be shopping for a new frame or bike.

Most manufacturers list the geometry of their bikes, and carefully reading this info can give you a much better idea of what bikes will fit and what wont. And a cheaper frame that fits properly is much better than a fancier or lighter frame that does not fit.

Good luck!
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Old 03-28-11, 04:11 PM   #15
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I took the bike to a different shop this morning and asked to have a fitting done. Keep in mind that I'm new to riding and my longest ride has only been 30 miles. I'm not sure how it would feel after 50, 60, 70. They put the bike in a trainer and started adjusting the bike. The problem seems to be that even with my seat in the highest position (almost 11" of seat post). My legs still do not fully extend. The fitter showed me on a protractor that at the bottom position, my leg should almost be fully extended. There was still more of a bend in my leg than he said there should be even with the seatpost that high. When he raised the seatpost, he said that's going to put much more strain on my arms and neck because it put me in a more hunched over position. He put on a new head piece that connects to the handlebars which was almost the twice the length of what I had. He said I could ride this bike but after a while it could cause knee problems and will also cause fatigue in my arms and neck. He said I'm better off looking at somewhere around a 60CM. Since my bike is a Specialized Allez Comp, maybe I should look at the geometry for a Specialized 60CM and then match up any other brands to get close to those specs.
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Old 03-29-11, 09:52 AM   #16
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Doesn't necessaily need to be close to the specs of the Specialized... just bigger than what you have.

THe most important items to look for on geometry charts are (when comparing similar bikes like road-bike to road-bike or touring-bike to touring-bike) are: Seat tube length, horizontal/virtual/effective top tube length, and head tube length.

Seat tube length - often there are more than one number given. Since a lot of bikes have seat tubes that extend well above the top tube, the centre-top (C-T) and centre-centre (C-C) numbers are vastly different. I usually like to go by the C-C measurement because sometimes the top extension is not strong enough to hold the whole weight of the rider, and hence should not be considered a structural part of the frame. You need the seat to be at the correct height with a good amount of seatpost still down inside the frame - at least to the bottom of the top tube for proper support. If your seat height now is 'close' to the correct height then estimate how much longer the seat tube has to be to get full leg extension and still have the seat post far enough into the frame.

Top tube length - the effective or horizontal or level top tube length determines how far forward you have to reach to the handlebars. Larger bikes generally have a longer reach, but this can be adjusted by swapping to longer or shorter stems, although swapping stems can only change the reach a limited amount and it is not a quick adjustment like moving your saddle or seat post.

Head tube length - THe length of the head tube is often a limiting factor in how high your handlebars can go. Most forks come from the factory with a steerer tube long enough to add spacers under the stem, but the steerer tube if often cut when bikes are assembled so the amount of spacers can be limited. Also, for very lightweight forks with carbon steerers, many people reccomend limiting the amount of spacers used to prevent damage to the steerer.
If the steerer is not long enough to fit more spacers and you still think the bars shoudl be higher, you can purchase stems that have more rise, but this can also only raise the bars a limited amount, unless you can find some oddball extra-high-rise stem.
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