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  1. #1
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    removing valve core

    I have a set of Fulcrum Zero 2 way fit wheels.
    I am trying to remove the core to inject some sealant. The core spins freely but
    will not come out easily. I am hesitant to try to pull hard on the core and damage the valve.

    Is this normal to have a core that doesn't come out easily in a no tube wheelset or should I just pull hard?

    Thanks for any information.

    As an addition, both front and rear wheel core does not come out. The core spins freely in the valve but is not removable.

  2. #2
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Some Presta valve stems are not removable.. get some new inner tubes from your bike shop.

    .. maybe just buy pre "slimed" .. (tm) ..

  3. #3
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    thanks for the quick reply. However, these are no tube rims with pre installed stems. The rims are new and the valve stems are set in the rims.
    So, no need for tubes or inner tubes.
    The question is, are the cores removable on the Fulcrum Racing zero no tube pre installed valves?

    Thank you

  4. #4
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
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    Even if the cores are not removable why not just squirt the sealant into the tire directly instead of through the stem?

    But more importantly if you put the sealant into the tire you're going to have a VERY messy situation when you ever want to remove the tire. I'd suggest you don't bother and just carry a patch kit to fix the tire in event of a flat. After all from looking at the info on these wheels the point is to produce a lighter setup than that found with a tube and tire. Adding sealant would defeat the point of keeping the wheels and tires as light as possible where you worry about such things to the point of not using even a light latex or vinyl tube.

    As for the stem and core options I'd suggest you email the makers of these wheels directly since this is such a specific wheelset and stem that "general" methods don't mean much if it turns out that the stems you have use a permanently sealed in valve core.
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

  5. #5
    biked well well biked's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    Even if the cores are not removable why not just squirt the sealant into the tire directly instead of through the stem?

    But more importantly if you put the sealant into the tire you're going to have a VERY messy situation when you ever want to remove the tire. I'd suggest you don't bother and just carry a patch kit to fix the tire in event of a flat. After all from looking at the info on these wheels the point is to produce a lighter setup than that found with a tube and tire. Adding sealant would defeat the point of keeping the wheels and tires as light as possible where you worry about such things to the point of not using even a light latex or vinyl tube.

    As for the stem and core options I'd suggest you email the makers of these wheels directly since this is such a specific wheelset and stem that "general" methods don't mean much if it turns out that the stems you have use a permanently sealed in valve core.
    First, I don't have any experience with Fulcrum road tubeless wheels. I've used Stan's Notubes tubeless system on mountain bikes for nearly ten years, and have loved it. When I first started using Stan's, it was new and seemed crazy to most folks. Now, in the mtb world, Stan's system and tubeless systems in general are pretty much accepted as the way to go for most off road situations.

    Now, for road tubeless. I had a hard time getting my head around why this would be a good thing, really. I still haven't used it.

    But my shop is a Stan's Notubes dealer (selling mostly mtb tubeless products, not road). And my business partner in the shop has decided to try road tubeless, and invested in a set of Stan's Notubes road wheels and the accompanying Hutchinson tires. These can be run at normal road tire pressures, but for a lot of folks it may be tempting to run them at a bit lower pressure than normal for better ride quality (with no worry of pinch flats, of course).

    I've always been aware of the pitfalls of using a tubeless system, particularly a "converted" conventional mtb rim/tire, at pressures above about 40psi. So this whole thing of using road tubeless at 100+psi had me a little wary. However, with the specially designed Stan's wheels along with the tubeless-ready tires, it works with no problems and the tires air up just as easily as tires with tubes!

    Okay, so I'm impressed with that. But what about flat protection? The need for sealant? Okay, and again, I haven't used a road tubeless sytem.....yet. As for my business partner, he's done probably a dozen rides so far on the new wheels/tires, with Stan's sealant installed, with no flats. Certainly not enough time on the system to declare them practically "flat free" like I declared Stan's mountain bike tubeless system years ago.

    But check out this video. For the road tire getting poked with sharp things and staying inflated, fast forward to about 2:30 in the video. Good ol' Stan showing off his products once again.

    So to sum up, you use the sealant in road tubeless for the same reason you do on mountain bikes: to prevent flats.

    http://www.notubes.com/Movies_Kit_Installation.aspx

    Edit: actually, once you click on the link, you'll have to click on the "puncture demo" video at the bottom and then fast forward to 2:30 for the road tire getting punctured.
    Last edited by well biked; 03-27-11 at 11:58 AM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MGS9500 View Post
    The question is, are the cores removable on the Fulcrum Racing zero no tube pre installed valves?
    I don't know about Fulcrum,I run Shimano tubeless wheels and the valves they provide don't have removable cores, which makes it a real pain to add sealant. The Hutchson tires fit very tightly on the rim and it's not possible to add sealant by separating,or pulling the tire away the rim.

    Stan sells presta valves with removable cores. Makes it a lot easier to add sealant.

  7. #7
    pmt
    pmt is offline
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    Just push the tire aside and inject it directly into the rim. A little bit might drip out but it won't be much. I've converted five different kinds of rim to Road Tubeless and never take the cores out. With thousands of kilometers on Road Tubeless, I certainly prefer using sealant, as it really has saved the ride a few times.

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