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  1. #1
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    Repair stand suggestions

    I am in the market for a repair stand and was looking at two different styles

    1) Park PCS-10, clamps bike by seatpost or frame tubes
    2) Park PRS-20, supports bike by bottom bracket and front or rear dropouts.

    It seems that the PRS-20 would provide better support when working on drive trains.

    Anyone have pros or cons on either of these styles of repair stands?
    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Northwestrider's Avatar
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    I like the Ultimate Pro Elite bicycle stand, I've noticed Feedback Sports has a similar stand, it may be the same under a different name. In any case, it's a solid stand, easily adjusted.

  3. #3
    Pleasurable Pain greyghost_6's Avatar
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    The bottom bracket one works better on bikes that do not have easy access to seat tubes, or bikes that dont have circular tubes like carbon fiber bikes, or small bikes that dont have enough tube for a park stand to grip. I only own park stands, they are easier to resell (my opinion) and its what I always have used and what im comfortable with. I just like the locking mechanism, and the easy adjust threaded style adjuster.
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    Senior Member CACycling's Avatar
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    I've got the PCS-10 and it is awesome. I can rotate the bike 360 degrees to work on it from all angles as well as adjust height to work on it comfortably. It also folds up fairly compact. Bike Island has them for $135 w/ free S+H.

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    +1 on the pro elite stand which is now made by Feedback Sports...Ultimate sold off this part of their company and focuses on speaker stands.

    -j

  6. #6
    pmt
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    PRS-20 style is almost always a better bet. You're not going to damage anything with nearly any bike, and you get a lot more leverage when working on stuff.

  7. #7
    DOS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenfieldja View Post
    +1 on the pro elite stand which is now made by Feedback Sports...Ultimate sold off this part of their company and focuses on speaker stands.

    -j
    +2 Great stand. and great support from Feedback. Even though I bought my ultimate before Feedback sports bought the product line, when I had trouble with my clamp, Feedback was very helpful in getting me the info I needed to fix it.
    Last edited by DOS; 03-31-11 at 10:41 AM.
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  8. #8
    Senior Member ncfisherman's Avatar
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    The PRS-20 is a race stand - it's big advantage is the portability. I would avoid that, if I was looking for a home stand. The PRS-10 or the Feedback stand would provide a more solid base to work on.

  9. #9
    Mud, Gore & Guts eddubal's Avatar
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    I have the PCS-10 and love it. It's nice to be able to get the bike in any position needed. Convenient to not have to partially disassemble the bike

  10. #10
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclist2000 View Post
    I am in the market for a repair stand and was looking at two different styles

    1) Park PCS-10, clamps bike by seatpost or frame tubes
    2) Park PRS-20, supports bike by bottom bracket and front or rear dropouts.

    It seems that the PRS-20 would provide better support when working on drive trains.

    Anyone have pros or cons on either of these styles of repair stands?
    The major flaw with the PRS-20 is the fork mount. It's a hassle if you want to work on the headset, fork, front brake or front wheel while in the fork. You might be able to turn the bike around and remove the rear wheel, clamp it in the rear dropouts but that's a lot of excess fiddling. If you have a delicate bike, the PRS-20 serves it's purpose but if you don't need the stand for that, why deal with the headaches. I've had something similar in the past (a Minoura) and it really is a pain to use.

    The PCS-10 is okay but the PCS-4 has a better clamp. The price is more but a stand will last you for decades and the clamp is easier to operate with one hand.

    If you want something that the cockroaches will appreciate while riding titanium bikes and eating carbon ones, go for the PCS-3. Very expensive but truly shop quality. I've had one for 20+ years and I expect to get another 3 or 4 hundred years out of it
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  11. #11
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    I don't get why repair stands are so rad. I own one of the cheaper park ones, and i've worked with the fancy ones at the bike shop, but at home, i always just use my bike storage stand.

  12. #12
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    The major flaw with the PRS-20 is the fork mount. It's a hassle if you want to work on the headset, fork, front brake or front wheel while in the fork. You might be able to turn the bike around and remove the rear wheel, clamp it in the rear dropouts but that's a lot of excess fiddling. If you have a delicate bike, the PRS-20 serves it's purpose but if you don't need the stand for that, why deal with the headaches. I've had something similar in the past (a Minoura) and it really is a pain to use.

    The PCS-10 is okay but the PCS-4 has a better clamp. The price is more but a stand will last you for decades and the clamp is easier to operate with one hand.

    If you want something that the cockroaches will appreciate while riding titanium bikes and eating carbon ones, go for the PCS-3. Very expensive but truly shop quality. I've had one for 20+ years and I expect to get another 3 or 4 hundred years out of it
    What's a delicate bike? Carbon?

    I was thinking that it would be more stable when adjusting the drivetrain and cranking through the gears. I just envision the rear moving around more on the PCS-10 and the PCS-20 would be more rigid.
    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
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  13. #13
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclist2000 View Post
    What's a delicate bike? Carbon?

    I was thinking that it would be more stable when adjusting the drivetrain and cranking through the gears. I just envision the rear moving around more on the PCS-10 and the PCS-20 would be more rigid.
    Yes. Carbon or other frames that can't be clamped with the clamp on a PCS-4. There are some. I always clamp to the seatpost anyway.

    Cranking through gears isn't all that difficult with the traditional clamp stands. The bike moves some but it's not that much of an issue. Being able to work on the front of the bike while having freedom of movement is much more important. Think of having to change or adjust a headset without being able to move the fork. How would you remove and install traditional cups on the PCS-20? The fork needs to be clamped but you need the fork free to remove the cups.
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  14. #14
    Senior Member somedood's Avatar
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    I also have a Feedback Sports workstand, it's the "Mechanic" one and I love it. It's super stable, aluminum so it's a bit lighter than the steel ones and raises higher than most of the others in the same class. The clamp is really easy to spin closed as well. Plus I have the truing stand they make and it clamps on top of the stand so I can stand while I true, but that's probably not one of the biggest features of the stand.

  15. #15
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Arms that stick out from basement /garage framing in the walls work, too,
    as will hooks from the overhead.

    I think you need the PRS 20 if you have a Carbon and non round tubed frame

    that sort is what the Grand tour team mechs use
    because they get all the super light stuff from the sponsors
    to show off to the consumers , that may crush if gripped in a stand.
    Last edited by fietsbob; 03-31-11 at 12:43 PM.

  16. #16
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    I think you need the PRS 20 if you have a Carbon and non round tubed frame
    Do you mean like this?

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    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
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  17. #17
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclist2000 View Post
    Do you mean like this?

    Giant Carbon
    I would use the seat post for clamping that frame. But I use the seat post almost exclusively. I've never crushed a frame but I've seen crushed frames. Seat posts are cheap.
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    My uncle had a Campy metal workstand from the early 70's. It had a metal clamp that clamped the down tube, right on the decals. That's why the bikes he gave me have crushed and missing decals.

    My point? I love my Park PCS-10 with seat post clamp!
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  19. #19
    DOS
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    I would use the seat post for clamping that frame. But I use the seat post almost exclusively. I've never crushed a frame but I've seen crushed frames. Seat posts are cheap.
    Generally good advice even with steel and alu frames. Higher end steel and alu tubes are pretty thin and even if worry is not that straight forward clamp pressure will damage the frame tube, damage could result from increased pressure if you change position of the bike while attached to the stand (i.e. from raising the height of the stand or rotating the clamp to change angle of the bike (say from horizontal to angled to facilitate easire access to a deraillleur, underside of the bb shell, or whatever) . Also, if you have carbon seatpost, its a good idea to have an alloy post lying around to swap in when working on the bike.
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  20. #20
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    I would use the seat post for clamping that frame. But I use the seat post almost exclusively. I've never crushed a frame but I've seen crushed frames. Seat posts are cheap.
    That bike also has a carbon seat post and I may need to use an old alloy one to use a stand with it.

    Thank you and everyone else that provided comments.

    I think I may have been trying to find some justification for going with the PCS-20 style.
    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
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  21. #21
    pmt
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclist2000 View Post
    That bike also has a carbon seat post and I may need to use an old alloy one to use a stand with it.

    Thank you and everyone else that provided comments.

    I think I may have been trying to find some justification for going with the PCS-20 style.
    Well, yeah, pulling the seatpost just to work on the bike is silly. With a PRS-20 style, you drop off the front wheel, pop it on the stand and it's strong and stable. Try torquing a bottom bracket on a seatpost-clamp stand. Have fun with that!

  22. #22
    DOS
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmt View Post
    pulling the seatpost just to work on the bike is silly. With a PRS-20 style, you drop off the front wheel, pop it on the stand and it's strong and stable.Try torquing a bottom bracket on a seatpost-clamp stand. Have fun with that!
    Its not that hard, really. Swapping seat posts not appreciably more complicated than removing front wheel and I can get plenty of torque on BBs. That said, PRS-20 looks like a nice option
    Last edited by DOS; 04-01-11 at 06:59 AM.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    Yes. Carbon or other frames that can't be clamped with the clamp on a PCS-4. There are some. I always clamp to the seatpost anyway.

    Cranking through gears isn't all that difficult with the traditional clamp stands. The bike moves some but it's not that much of an issue. Being able to work on the front of the bike while having freedom of movement is much more important. Think of having to change or adjust a headset without being able to move the fork. How would you remove and install traditional cups on the PCS-20? The fork needs to be clamped but you need the fork free to remove the cups.
    It is not a problem doing headset work on a Euro-style work stand, you just clamp the frame to the stand at the bottom bracket and the rear dropouts instead of the fork. One could even argue that the Euro style stand is better when it comes to headset work, since the frame will remain stable even if you apply pressure to the crown tube; clamp style works stands tends to become wobbly when the frame is clamped at the seat post, but pressure is applied to the crown tube.

    There is in fact a lot of good to be said about such stands compared to tall clamp-style work stands; they keep the bike very stable and well aligned. They keeps the handlebar stable. Allows easy access to both sides of the bikes, by eg, rotating the stand/bike. You can't crush the frame or seat post by accident and don't need to swap out the seat post. They are usually lighter and more compact than clamp style stands, which is useful for traveling or stowing away.

    I am not claiming overall superiority, just that the principle behind the Euro style stand is very sound, and that they work well for all kinds of bike related work.

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  24. #24
    Senior Member kamtsa's Avatar
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    I also use the Ultimate Pro Elite and am very happy with it. Solid, folds and it came with a nice bag.

  25. #25
    We haven't located us yet nealjoslyn's Avatar
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    I am in favor of the seatpost clamping style because of the versatility of being able to work on anything on the bike easily, including the headset, without reclamping and fiddling with removing wheels. There is a reason they use this style of repair stand in bike shops, you know. BTW, I am currently in the market for a new repair stand as well, and I appreciate all the suggestions in this thread. Based on people's enthusiasm with the Feedback Sports stands, I will probably end up getting one from them.

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