Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Cottered Crank Amesja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Chicago
    My Bikes
    1954 Raleigh Sports 1974 Raleigh Competition 1969 Raleigh Twenty 1964 Raleigh LTD-3
    Posts
    3,401
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Cotters -to lube or not to lube

    I've always installed cotters with lube on everything but leaving the load bearing cut and the notch dry. I also always lubed the spindle and the crank arm too.

    Now I'm reading Barnett's and he says to do it dry.

    Have I been doing it wrong all along? Or is this like the grease/no-grease wars on square-taper cranks? (I grease those too)
    '74 Raleigh Carlton Competition w/ Ultegra | '97 Trek 720 Singletrack CX-er w/ 105 | '64 Raleigh LTD-3 modernized w/ all alloy components |'69 Raleigh Twenty | '54 Raleigh Sports

  2. #2
    Senior Member SJX426's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Alexandria, Va
    My Bikes
    1972 Motobecane Le Champion (totaled), 1973 Bottecchia Giro d'Italia, 1983 Colnago Superissimo, 1984 Trek 610, 1994 Burley Duet, 1988(?) Pinarello Tre Cime, 88 Masi Gran Corsa (Frame), 1991 Pinarello Montello, 1997 Specialized RockHopper
    Posts
    2,953
    Mentioned
    16 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Torque specifications are typically for dry parts (not lubed). There should be significantly less torque used when lubrication is inlcluded, as much as 40% of dry torque spec. Specifications take into acount the assembly and the fact the part are dry. Why would you lube the parts? Are you preventing rust or other corrosion concerns? There is a possibilty of over torquing if you use lube unless you know the proper torque spec to use for the lubricant used.

  3. #3
    Cottered Crank Amesja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Chicago
    My Bikes
    1954 Raleigh Sports 1974 Raleigh Competition 1969 Raleigh Twenty 1964 Raleigh LTD-3
    Posts
    3,401
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by SJX426 View Post
    Torque specifications are typically for dry parts (not lubed). There should be significantly less torque used when lubrication is inlcluded, as much as 40% of dry torque spec. Specifications take into acount the assembly and the fact the part are dry. Why would you lube the parts? Are you preventing rust or other corrosion concerns? There is a possibilty of over torquing if you use lube unless you know the proper torque spec to use for the lubricant used.
    Cotters aren't torqued, they are press-fit. You can't get them too tight. I understand how torque values are modified from dry threading to "wet." This is different. There is no torque involved. The press specification is "at least 50lbs of pressure" according to Barnett's.

    The idea behind lubrication is that they don't creek and squeek.
    '74 Raleigh Carlton Competition w/ Ultegra | '97 Trek 720 Singletrack CX-er w/ 105 | '64 Raleigh LTD-3 modernized w/ all alloy components |'69 Raleigh Twenty | '54 Raleigh Sports

  4. #4
    Senior Member bikeman715's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Salinas , Ca.
    My Bikes
    Bike Nashbar AL-1 ,Raligh M50 , Schwinn Traveler , and others
    Posts
    2,079
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It ok to lube for reasons such as preventing rust or other corrosion concerns. I have done it for years and never have a problem.
    bikeman715

  5. #5
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,398
    Mentioned
    50 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Cotters themselves are intentionally a soft steel, the nut is just there to keep it in place .

    so very little torque on the nut.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •