Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    8
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Putting a chain on...is it easy?

    I've got a new chain for my project bike and I'm waiting for my new chain link tool which should be with me on Thursday the 14th. Are chains easy to put on?
    2010 BOSS Stealth
    2007 Jeep Wrangler X - still collecting all the bits for this one
    2005 Author Matrix SX - modified
    1988 Jaguar XJ40 Sovereign 3.6

  2. #2
    Senior Member Monster Pete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Warwick, UK
    My Bikes
    2000-something 3 speed commuter, 1990-something Raleigh Scorpion
    Posts
    1,048
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Using a chain tool, there's not a huge amount that can go wrong really. Most important is to set the correct chain length- for a derailleur bicycle the rule-of-thumb is to find the length that will wrap the large front chainring and large rear sprocket without going through the rear derailleur, then add one inch (two teeth.) If you have just a single front chainring, adding two inches may work better as the derailleur won't be pulled forward as much. For a single speed or hub gear setup you obviously just use the shortest length that works.

  3. #3
    It's got electrolytes! chucky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    My Bikes
    Self-designed carbon fiber highracer, BikesDirect Kilo WT5, Pacific Cycles Carryme, Dahon Boardwalk with custom Sturmey Archer wheelset
    Posts
    1,394
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah, it's easy....just try not to get the chain twisted into a mobius strip.
    A sure sign of a successful experiment is when failure is prolonged until the experimenter forgets that he's even conducting an experiment.

  4. #4
    Constant tinkerer FastJake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin
    Posts
    6,120
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What kind of chain? Hyperglide chains should not be broken and put back together without the use of special pins or master links like the old style single speed chains, which can be broken and lengthened/shortened this way.
    Why "derailer" is the correct way to spell the gear-change mechanism: sheldonbrown.com/derailer.html

  5. #5
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    England
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc, 2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    Posts
    3,976
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by kamilb1998 View Post
    I've got a new chain for my project bike and I'm waiting for my new chain link tool which should be with me on Thursday the 14th. Are chains easy to put on?
    Assuming it's not a single-speed (I don't know anything about SS, they may or may not be the same as bikes with derailleurs), if you use something like a SRAM powerlink it's a very simple job. I routinely take my chain off to clean it, you can take the powerlink off with your fingers (no tools required), and it goes back together just as easily.

  6. #6
    Cottered Crank Amesja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Chicago
    My Bikes
    1954 Raleigh Sports 1974 Raleigh Competition 1969 Raleigh Twenty 1964 Raleigh LTD-3
    Posts
    3,350
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Breaking a chain is dead simple with the proper tool. Pushing the pin back in is a little bit tougher. Don't push the pin out too far -no further than you need to in order for the chain to come apart. If you push it all the way out it'll be harder getting it back in. It'll want to skew and bind. Also, there is a technique for loosening up a tight link which you might get when you push the pin back in. The chain tool you get may have instructions for this but basically you use the second set of teeth on the tool to help push the pin while pulling at the side of the chain so it isn't too tight. If you are handy this is pretty obvious and self-explanatory. If not, there is a bunch of info out there online. It's not rocket science. If bike mechanics can figure it out any trained monkey can do the same.

    Determining the correct number of links you need is the next thing. It'll be obvious with a single-speed but with a deraileur bike it'll be a bit more work to make sure it isn't too long or too short. Sheldon has a good page for hints on this.
    '74 Raleigh Carlton Competition w/ Ultegra | '97 Trek 720 Singletrack CX-er w/ 105 | '64 Raleigh LTD-3 modernized w/ all alloy components |'69 Raleigh Twenty | '54 Raleigh Sports

  7. #7
    Senior Member sonatageek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Cleveland,Ohio
    Posts
    2,674
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I like SRAM chains with their speed link. Simple and convenient since it is easy to take the chain off for cleaning. Of course you would still need a chain tool if the length is too long.

  8. #8
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    St. Louis
    My Bikes
    Specialized Tarmac Comp
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Be careful "reusing" pins or breaking your chain at the same link more than once. The thinner Shimano chains require you replace the pin with a brand new pin and unless you follow instructions carefully you risk a catastrophic chain break possibly leading to personal injury. I suggest careful follow up with your chain manufacture's web site.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    St Peters, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
    Posts
    23,589
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    3 issues:

    1. Get the chain length right. - See Monster Pete's post.
    2. Look for little tabs on your rear derailleur arm. Make sure you thread the chain properly through them. It's one of those things that's obvious but easy to screw up.
    3. Don't create a tight link. - See Amesja's post.

  10. #10
    Bikus Commuterus CFXMarauder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, Fl
    My Bikes
    Trek 820, Specialized Allez Sport
    Posts
    224
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

  11. #11
    Senior Member Northwestrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Gig Harbor, WA
    My Bikes
    Surly Long Haul Trucker, Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo, Dahon Mu P 24 , Bacchetta Strada, Rodriguez Tandem
    Posts
    2,073
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It's easy, read the directions that will accompany your chain tool, then take your time. There should be more than one video on youtube that will be of help.

  12. #12
    Chainstay Brake Mafia
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    California
    Posts
    5,847
    Mentioned
    14 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    just make sure the pin on the chain tool is lined up with the pin on the chain.. and make sure you buy a good quality tool. i bent the pin on the one i got when it wasn't lined up right

    also, when shortening a chain, i learned the hard way not to use the chain tool on links that are not connected on both sides.. it can cause the chain to bend.. i did this and now that chain is too short to be used :'(
    1986 Diamondback Apex ~ 1988 Diamondback Ascent EX ~ 1989 Jamis Dakar ~ 1989 Specialized Stumpjumper Comp
    1993 Trek 8300 Composite ~ 1993 Diamondback Axis Team Titanium ~ 1995 Diamondback Apex

    Join the Chainstay Brake Mafia!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •