Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 36
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    856
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    raleigh english 3 speed questions....

    Well....it is a Huffy Sportsman made by Raleigh. I assume that counts.

    Ive got a 1963 model. Cottered cranks, but it does not have the fancy RH chainring...just a generic chrome one........ I got a great deal on it ($10 barn find). It has been sitting for ever and im just now staring it in the face. WE are having a local 3 speed event here in the comming weeks that will likely turn into a regular weekly ride. Im thinking of getting it ready.

    THe SA AW hub works great. Put a new indicator chain on it last night and just finished fiddling around with getting it adjusted properly. It has the grip shifter and not the thumb trigger.

    Anyway....i regreased the headset but have yet to do the BB. I can get some grade B cotters locally and can find a cotter press locally. IM wondering if i should ride it first and then do that later after my first ride. Im not sure how things look in there.

    I ran some wax over a few spots on the frame to see if the oxidation would come off....and it does......and it actually might shine once im done It needs a cleaning bad....

    Ill post some before and after pics once i get around to it in the daylight.

    Now on my my questions:

    1. THe chain. How do you remove it. IT doesnt look like normal chain pins that you push out. the little links say "england" on them. There is one strange looking link that has a flat plate for a link. Im thinking this is like the sram flex link thing that the sram chains use for quick removal but thought i would ask first. Id like to pop the chain off ...give it a degreasing and relubing.


    Ill have more questions as i go along im sure. Ill keep adding them to the thread.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    856
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    2. I pulled my pedals off tonight to start overhauling them. THey were full of a thick grease. Much thicker than the park stuff you get at the bike shop. SHould i be redoing this wtih the park grease or put some heavier stuff in there like what was originally in there?

    I got the chain off btw...and it cleaned up really nice.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    My Bikes
    1974 Raleigh Sports
    Posts
    307
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hi scale,

    Don't touch the cottered BB if you can avoid it. I've been inside my Raleigh's cottered BB twice, once to rebuild the BB and again when it finally died. The Mark Stonich cotter press is a dream and made my cotter work a non-issue, but my old BB threads, with the attendant corrosion/seizing/stripping, were heinous. I ruined two BB tools and almost totaled my frame along with some brand-new Phil Wood retaining rings on the second go-around.

    I know how tempting it can be to be thorough, but in this case, try to make an exception and don't fix it if it ain't broke.

    If your BB truly needs work, or if you don't want to listen to me, get penetrating oil and a blowtorch on your side, not at the same time. Good luck.

  4. #4
    Senior Member oldroads's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    642
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sounds like you figured out how to remove the master link on that chain.
    I'd replace it with a new one. Keep the old one if you like, but don't ride with it. It's probably original and worn and can break.
    A new single speed chain would be $10 to $12.

    The pedals can be re-greased with Park grease.

    Enjoy your new ride!
    Vinny - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles - OldRoads.com
    BUY/SELL forum (no fees) - Price Guides - 19 years of archives

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    856
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks. I might stay out of my bb for that very reason. IT feels smooth and nohting is loose. No metal on metal sounds so there must be grease in there doing its job now. For a chain....would any SS chain fit the bill? i have used the SRAM pc1 chain and it has worked great on some of my past projects. I dont have a chain wear measuring tool but this old chain does look pretty decent.

    Ill probably be gutting and cleaning the other pedal today and refitting them both using te park grease.

  6. #6
    Senior Member jeepr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Detroit, MI
    Posts
    552
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    the chain size is 1/2" x 1/8". normally called a single speed chain.

    Park grease will work. So will bearing grease..

    Looking forward to the pics!

  7. #7
    Senior Member oldroads's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    642
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes, the SRAM pc1 chain would be fine.
    Vinny - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles - OldRoads.com
    BUY/SELL forum (no fees) - Price Guides - 19 years of archives

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    856
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Here are some pics before i started tearing it down:




















    Last edited by scale; 04-17-11 at 06:57 AM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member oldroads's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    642
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A worthy project.
    Vinny - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles - OldRoads.com
    BUY/SELL forum (no fees) - Price Guides - 19 years of archives

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    856
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    brought her outside last night now that i have it stripped down and gave the frame a good washing with a mix of hot water, dawn dishwashing liquid and a small bit of simple green. IM thinking im going to have to get after it with a more potent mix of simple green because there is some grease that is so aged i cant even brush it off with a stiff brush. My fingernail wont scratch it either.

    I cant figure out if this thing is suppose to be flat black or if it is just that faded out. im thinking of throwing a coat or 2 on it to see if it will shine up after i get it compeltely clean. All signs right now point to it being a flat black style paint...but im not sure.

  11. #11
    Senior Member badmother's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,941
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You mentioned the old siff grease twice, in the pedals and on the frame. The old grease was made of soap and oil (some still is). When the bike (and grease) is old the oil evaporates and the soap is what you are left with. Therefor you just use a good normal grease after cleaning up bearrings.

    I would be a bit worryed about the BB for the same reason. I`ve opened old BB`s that "felt fine" but looked awful innside. Try at least to get some oil innside your BB to loosen up the soap that I guess is innside. If you can manage to do this several times maybe the BB is going to be fine for some time AND maybe loosen up the rust that may be in the threads. You could make the BB your winter project?
    °Empty drums make a lot of noice... (Old Hungarian proverb).

  12. #12
    Senior Member Mauriceloridans's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Shreveport
    My Bikes
    1983 Trek 520, early 80's Univega Gran Tourismo, '98 Santana Arriva
    Posts
    269
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't think you can get oil in the BB (especially the drive side) without pressing out the cotter on the non drive side. If you have to go that far, clean it all out and regrease the whole thing.

  13. #13
    SE Wis dedhed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Milwaukee, WI
    My Bikes
    '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400
    Posts
    2,195
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    New Kool stop brake pads or plan on dragging your feet to stop. Well plan on dragging your feet even with new pads if it's wet out.
    '68 Raleigh Sprite, '02 Raleigh C500, '84 Raleigh Gran Prix, '91 Trek 400

  14. #14
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    YEG
    My Bikes
    See my sig...
    Posts
    25,924
    Mentioned
    14 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mauriceloridans View Post
    I don't think you can get oil in the BB (especially the drive side) without pressing out the cotter on the non drive side. If you have to go that far, clean it all out and regrease the whole thing.
    If the bottom bracket is smooth it should be fine and you should be able to adjust it without removing the cotters but if you want to get really old school and make that bottom bracket run as smooth as silk add some oil from the top of the seat post.

    Spin the pedals to get this circulating and this will refresh the grease and the oil that flows out will carry out any contaminants.

    Both my 50's Raleighs have oil fittings in the bottom bracket for this very purpose and they spin as smoothly now as they did 50 years ago and I have had no need to rebuild their bottom brackets as everything in there is clean and shiny.

    Both these bikes have seen a lot of use so are not garage queens either.

    I have done this with old bikes where the bottom brackets were properly adjusted but almost seized because the old grease had turned to paste... oiling them restores their function very quickly and then when you tear things down the fresh oil will have softened up the old grease and cleaning things up is much easier.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Mauriceloridans's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Shreveport
    My Bikes
    1983 Trek 520, early 80's Univega Gran Tourismo, '98 Santana Arriva
    Posts
    269
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    [QUOTE=Sixty Fiver;12527493] but if you want to get really old school and make that bottom bracket run as smooth as silk add some oil from the top of the seat post.

    Well, I didn't know that because I'm only a "fifty-fiver".

  16. #16
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    YEG
    My Bikes
    See my sig...
    Posts
    25,924
    Mentioned
    14 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)
    [QUOTE=Mauriceloridans;12527594]
    Quote Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver View Post
    but if you want to get really old school and make that bottom bracket run as smooth as silk add some oil from the top of the seat post.

    Well, I didn't know that because I'm only a "fifty-fiver".
    Being older than me you should know this...

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    2,064
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Take it easy with the Simple Green. That stuff can melt paint (probably only certain kinds) and destroy decals.

    If you want an unbelievably beautiful outcome: Meguir's Scratch-X (at auto store). I saw it recommended by someone on the C&V list (where you and your bike would be welcomed). I tried it on a Raleigh DL-1. I honestly couldn't believe how beautiful it made the paint. Limpid is the only word I can use to describe the outcome. It also will remove pinstriping and destroy decals if you're not careful, however.

    RE: bottom bracket. Everyone has their horror tales, like FlyCRASH's. I have ruined forged cranks and probably some other things I'd care not to remember before I learned what I was doing (to the extent that I know). But I've also rebuilt probably 100 bottom brackets without incident. It's true that old ones occasionally are destroyed in the process if they are seized up. But they aren't all seized up. (The only bb-related thing I ever destroyed due to ignorance and lack of the proper tools rather than seizing, was, unfortunately, a SunTour Superb lockring.) IMO, however, if you have access to a cotter pin press, half the battle is already won. Usually, if you use the correct tools, the other parts (ahem, fixed cup aside) come apart intact and without too much effort.

    If things don't come immediately apart, a patient method of dripping some penetrating oil on the offending connection every night will eventually do the trick.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    856
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i have the correct tool for the bb and it is already apart. Took 2 seconds....

    im curious about that scratch x stuff.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    England, currently dividing my time between university in Guildford and home just outside Reading
    My Bikes
    Too many to list here!
    Posts
    1,808
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    What did you use to get the cotter pins out? I've only ever removed and replaced two, and I just used a hammer. Is there an easier way that doesn't involve expensive specialist tools?

  20. #20
    Senior Member Mauriceloridans's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Shreveport
    My Bikes
    1983 Trek 520, early 80's Univega Gran Tourismo, '98 Santana Arriva
    Posts
    269
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Airburst View Post
    What did you use to get the cotter pins out? I've only ever removed and replaced two, and I just used a hammer. Is there an easier way that doesn't involve expensive specialist tools?
    I use a very large "C" clamp with a socket over the head of the cotter pin so it can move in that direction as I torque on the clamp.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    My Bikes
    1974 Raleigh Sports
    Posts
    307
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't know if you consider this an expensive specialist tool, but I have a Mark Stonich cotter press that makes cotter removal and replacement nearly routine. It would be US$72 shipped to England. If you buy it early in your time as a bicycle mechanic, you'll get to spread that cost over more bikes. Hitting a rotating part with a hammer perpendicular to its axis kind of freaks me out; YMMV.

    http://bikesmithdesign.com/CotterPress/index.html

    On the other hand, I feel that even Mark's fixed cup tool is not up to the task of a stubborn fixed cup. But you can typically leave the fixed cup mounted when doing a BB overhaul.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    2,064
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I have tried many methods short of buying an actual cotter pin tool.

    The hammer usually destroys the cotter and I usually hit the bike in the process/

    Tried cheapie C-clamps. It's very difficult to keep everything straight so the force is directed straight through the center of the cotter. Clamps I used in this case deformed and were trash. A good quality one would probably be fine.

    Bar clamps are clumsy and there was too much slop in the ones I used.

    A small bench vise (not attached to a bench) works well (with all these methods using socket or axle spacer to provide a place for the pin to go and one or more nuts on the cotter to keep it from deforming too much), as long as the vise is big enough. I keep rediscovering that the one at the coop where I volunteer is just a hair too small.

    At the coop, what we usually do (when in our right minds) is put the whole bike up on the bench vice (with axle spacer over the blunt end of the cotter etc). Clumsy as hell but it usually works without destroying the pin or other parts of the bike.

    I've put the cotter pin press on the pretty please tool list at the coop.
    Last edited by Roll-Monroe-Co; 04-20-11 at 11:52 AM.

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    2,064
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by FLYcrash View Post
    I don't know if you consider this an expensive specialist tool, but I have a Mark Stonich cotter press that makes cotter removal and replacement nearly routine. It would be US$72 shipped to England. If you buy it early in your time as a bicycle mechanic, you'll get to spread that cost over more bikes. Hitting a rotating part with a hammer perpendicular to its axis kind of freaks me out; YMMV.

    http://bikesmithdesign.com/CotterPress/index.html

    On the other hand, I feel that even Mark's fixed cup tool is not up to the task of a stubborn fixed cup. But you can typically leave the fixed cup mounted when doing a BB overhaul.
    The problem (aside from applying adequate force) is getting a non-slip purchase on the shallow flats of the fixed cup--provided you really need to get it out.

    Sheldon Brown's method for the fixed cup is here (scroll down): http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tooltips/bbcups.html

    I made this work once, but it did some superficial damage to the cup.

    Last time, I used a large bolt, giant washer, and nut to attach a wrench (a large adjustable was all we had). to the cup and that way get leverage on it. Without having to worry about the wrench slipping off, you can put all your might on it. The cup came right out.

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    134
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hey Scale; that's a nice 'English' bike which is what we called them 50 years ago. Some time in the early '90s I did a 'metric century' (65 mi) on a stripped Raleigh with the coaster-brake 3-spd hub. I put a regular caliper brake on the front wheel and went with it since the ride was in the Jamestown, VA area with only very minor hills. We rode from Jamestown to Yorktown on the Colonial Pkwy, had lunch and went back. I actually managed to pass some guys on the way back! I know you'll enjoy the 3-speed event. I used to be into hubs - I built one bike with 26" x 2" semi-knobbies, fenders, an Atom hub brake in front and a Bendix 'Automatic' 2-spd coaster brake rear. It was supposed to be a 'rain bike' for my short commute to work at the time, and I did use it for that for some time.
    Inquiring minds want to know.

  25. #25
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Appleton WI
    My Bikes
    Several, mostly not name brands.
    Posts
    12,450
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by 1saxman View Post
    Hey Scale; that's a nice 'English' bike which is what we called them 50 years ago. Some time in the early '90s I did a 'metric century' (65 mi) on a stripped Raleigh with the coaster-brake 3-spd hub. I put a regular caliper brake on the front wheel and went with it since the ride was in the Jamestown, VA area with only very minor hills. We rode from Jamestown to Yorktown on the Colonial Pkwy, had lunch and went back. I actually managed to pass some guys on the way back! I know you'll enjoy the 3-speed event. I used to be into hubs - I built one bike with 26" x 2" semi-knobbies, fenders, an Atom hub brake in front and a Bendix 'Automatic' 2-spd coaster brake rear. It was supposed to be a 'rain bike' for my short commute to work at the time, and I did use it for that for some time.
    Some of us nutters still do that kind of thing: http://www.3speedtour.com/

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •