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  1. #1
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    Overhauling and Adjusting Pedals Without a Tabbed Washer: How?!

    So I got some cheap cage Wellgos that were really tight out of the box, so naturally I cracked them open to overhaul and adjust them (like I would any new pedals).

    Problem is, there's nothing to keep the adjusting cone from turning with the outer locknut when it comes time to tighten everything down. (There's nothing in between the two). Thus, tightening the locknut tightens the entire assembly, to the point where the pedal can't turn.


    I did some searching, and found these threads:



    The best explanations seem to involve holding the adjusting cone with pliers and somehow tightening the locknut, but it seems tough to fit a socket wrench and pliers in such a narrow hole.

    Were these not intended to be adjusted? Am I SOL? Is there some trick I don't know?

  2. #2
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
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    What I've done in similar situations is jam a screwdriver blade in between the cone and the pedal body to help hold it in place while tightening the locknut. It helps to leave the adjustment a bit loose at first, as the cone will inevitably be dragged tighter when the locknut is snugged down.

  3. #3
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
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    You can try to kludge things as John suggested above and that's pretty much the only way to do this. I'm guessing that the folks at the factory have this fancy double socket setup where the one slides down inside the other so they can work the two and then pinch them tight. Without going to a lot of trouble to fabricate such a specialty tool it's not going to be an easy job.
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    Thanks for the replies.

    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    I'm guessing that the folks at the factory have this fancy double socket setup where the one slides down inside the other so they can work the two and then pinch them tight.
    I saw something similar for SPD pedals:



    http://i.imgur.com/QqctH.jpg

    ...but it seemed unique to them. Is there no generalized equivalent (that might work in my case)? Or might this tool work for me?

  5. #5
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
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    I didn't know that anyone made such tools. Did they say what size hex's are at each end of the outer and "tubes"? If the sizes are the same as what you have in your pedals then this tool would do the trick.

    Where did you find this combo tool? EDIT- Nevermind, I found it on the Park Tools site but it's a reference to it being a Shimano tool. I need to get me one of those. Seems like it would be super handy.
    Last edited by BCRider; 04-25-11 at 03:03 PM.
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

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    I use pick with a right hand bend at the point. It's narrow enough to slip past the socket, and the bend lets me jam the cone hard. I still have to try two or three times to get it right, though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    I found it on the Park Tools site but it's a reference to it being a Shimano tool. I need to get me one of those. Seems like it would be super handy.
    Specs:
    The inner socket of the PD-63 is double sided, one is a 7mm, the other is 8mm, and this is used to secure or loosen the locknut. The outer portion is also double sided, with a 10mm and 11mm
    So it sounds like it would work (my wellgos are 8mm/11mm), but I can't find anywhere to buy one though, save for here, and they want ~$80! (Edit: here for "only" ~$50) Maybe there's a generic equivalent?

    Quote Originally Posted by dscheidt View Post
    I use pick with a right hand bend at the point. It's narrow enough to slip past the socket, and the bend lets me jam the cone hard. I still have to try two or three times to get it right, though.
    Ok, so it sucks for everyone else too I was afraid of that.
    Last edited by Purp; 04-25-11 at 04:23 PM.

  8. #8
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    When you get them set put a drop or two of blue Loctite on the locknuts.

  9. #9
    over the hill juls's Avatar
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    Ok, why no tabbed washer? Not meant to be adjusted? I'm only aquainted with the old stuff. (Lyotard, mks, koyoto etc)

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
    What I've done in similar situations is jam a screwdriver blade in between the cone and the pedal body to help hold it in place while tightening the locknut. It helps to leave the adjustment a bit loose at first, as the cone will inevitably be dragged tighter when the locknut is snugged down.
    +1 That's exactly how I adjusted the SR pedals that came on my first "good" bike in '85.

    Shimano once made a hollow thin-wall deep-well hex socket with wrench flats on the outside that fit over the locknut and was used to hold the cone stationary while you used a socket with an extension inside of it to tighten the lock nut. I don't know if these are available anymore and if the sizes would even work on your Wellgos.

  11. #11
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    I tried the "jam a screwdriver in to hold the adjusting cone" method, gave up and took them to the LBS. They told me they couldn't adjust them, adding "whatever you do, don't open them up"

  12. #12
    Cottered Crank Amesja's Avatar
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    Finesse and trial & error. Adjust it loose and tighten the locking nut up -check for play or over-tightness. If not right then try again. Sooner or later you are bound to hit the jackpot. Sometimes a screwdriver or other implement shoved down there helps the process. Sometimes it is better to be lucky than good.
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    See if you can return them and get the MKS pedals. Better quality and serviceable.

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